Nästa, Modern Jazz In Sweden

The author and wife at dinner in Stockholm (May 27) at a tapas restaurant on Ringvagen (near Skanstull t-bana stop) where the menu was in Swedish and the young waitress was Russian and didn't know Swedish very well, either, (which is very interesting because Russia and Sweden were arch-enemies for centuries) and so, between our three languages we ordered a big platter of everything and it was good -- photo by my brother-in-law Herb Brass (from Cincinnati)

The author and wife at dinner in Stockholm (May 27) at a tapas restaurant on Ringvagen (near Skanstull t-bana stop) where the menu was in Swedish and the young waitress was Russian and didn’t know Swedish very well, either, (which is very interesting because Russia and Sweden were arch-enemies for centuries) and so, between our three languages we ordered a big platter of everything and it was good — photo by my brother-in-law Herb Brass (from Cincinnati)

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

June 30, 2o16 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

NÄSTA, MODERN JAZZ IN SWEDEN

I’ve heard about these guys who collect Swedish jazz and now I know why: There’s an entire world of jazz in Sweden.

Sweden wasn’t so much exotic as familiar. (Maybe it’s genetic memory?) One realizes how much of European culture was brought over to America. I don’t want to make any grand sweeping categorical statements about the Swedish as I was only there nine days, and all of that inside Stockholm. I continued to get that deja vu and race memory thing, like this is my gene pool.

I saw a lot of bikes in Stockholm. In fact, I’m going to get one of those slick baskets for my bike, mounts on the front handlebars, carry groceries. I didn’t necessarily see much more people exercising in Stockholm, I think America has them beat on that count. And I heard there were yoga studios but I never saw one, whereas in America these days you can’t throw an old shoe with hitting a yoga studio.

Personifying Scandinavian countries as “Viking” is like seeing California as defined by Hells Angels. It’s an over-used and misused trope, altogether too freighted a term to be useful anymore.

The daylight was beginning to stretch into the night while we were there — Stockholm is at the 59th parallel in the northern hemisphere — Andy Fite told me that November is the darkest month, and Boel says that the snow helps reflect what light there is at that time of year and lighten things up. I’m curious to see it then, and travel out into the country side that I saw out the airplane window: Mountains and green valleys, elvish streams, primordial forests, little villages and farms, conifers, all dark mythology down there, the Eddas, and the Kalevala (which is Finnish), and Loki.

Jazz came early to Europe. Sweden picked up immediately on Louis Armstrong’s Hot Fives where upon the concept of swing was demonstrated and immediately obvious. Louis made sure the message was very clear. In what was the highpoint of Ken Burns’ JAZZ, the scholar (and violinist) Matt Glaser points out that in the 1920s you had Einstein’s theory of space time and all of a sudden here’s an American demonstrating how melody can move backwards & forwards against time and create this explosion of energy. Jazz was E = mc2 dude, energy equals mass and speed of light times two. The histories say that Sweden got bebop early on because of their neutrality during WW2, whereas, Denmark and Norway, were occupied by the Nazis, bebop came a little later. But, actual bebop records didn’t come along until 1945, after the war, and when shellac became available again from India (the lac bug gave its all for shellac disks). At any rate, modern jazz was thoroughly entrenched in dear old Stockholm for the entire 1950s and what a glory of music came out of that. American jazz artists never missed a visit to Sweden and in many cases stayed over for years.

After Bird, it’s interesting how much of an influence Lennie Tristano was on the Swedish musicians. They not only professed an interest in Lennie’s work, but you can hear it in theirs.

My traveling companion Janet Simon on the very efficient Stockholm t-bana (tunnelbana) -- June 3, 2o16 -- photo by Mark Weber -- "Nasta, Skanstull" the disembodied voice on the intercom intones our next stop, or "Nasta, Gamla Stan" or "Nasta, Hammarbyhojden"

My traveling companion Janet Simon on the very efficient Stockholm t-bana (tunnelbana) — June 3, 2o16 — photo by Mark Weber — “Nästa, Skanstull” the disembodied voice on the intercom intones our next stop, or “Nästa, Gamla Stan” or “Nästa, Hammarbyhojden”

The ancient primeval boreal forest on the outskirts of Stockholm, protected nature preserve -- photo by Mark Weber mid-afternoon June 2, 2o16 -- When the glaciers of the Ice Age retreated circa 10,000 years ago these alpine forests popped up of tall straight pines (with bark like a ponderosa), alm (wych elm), lind (small-leaved lime), lonn (maple), bok (beech), ask (ash), bjork (birch), birds, doves, crows, deer, dragon flies, grassy meadows, creeks (vik), didn't see any squirrels -- Consequently, Homo sapiens didn't move into Scandinavia until about 7,500 years ago (Homo sapiens first migrated into Europe 46,000 years ago) and before that the Neanderthals were around and about for 400,000 years but they didn't do the boat thing so they never crossed the Baltic to Sweden, as well the ice was not a little bit forbidding). Homo sapiens had boating technology in a high degree -- the forests of Europe were so thick and full of bears and suchlike it was smarter to use the rivers to get around.

The ancient primeval boreal forest on the outskirts of Stockholm, protected nature preserve — photo by Mark Weber mid-afternoon June 2, 2o16 — When the glaciers of the Ice Age retreated circa 10,000 years ago these alpine forests popped up of tall straight pines (with bark like a ponderosa), alm (wych elm), lind (small-leaved lime), lonn (maple), bok (beech), ask (ash), bjork (birch), birds, doves, crows, deer, dragon flies, grassy meadows, creeks (vik), didn’t see any squirrels — Consequently, Homo sapiens didn’t move into Scandinavia until about 7,500 years ago (Homo sapiens first migrated into Europe 46,000 years ago) and before that the Neanderthals were around and about for 400,000 years but they didn’t do the boat thing so they never crossed the Baltic to Sweden, as well the ice was not a little bit forbidding). Homo sapiens had boating technology in a high degree — the forests of Europe were so thick and full of bears and suchlike it was smarter to use the rivers to get around.

Eva Lindal's name translates to Valley of Lind Trees. I came across this Lind tree (aka small-leaved lime) in Nackareservaten. Her father is a Swede and just turned 90. Her mother was a refugee from Nazi Germany -- Sweden was very actively accepting refugee Jews during the war. Photo by Mark Weber -- June 2, 2o16.

Eva Lindal’s name translates to Valley of Lind Trees. I came across this Lind tree (aka small-leaved lime) in Nackareservaten. Her father is a Swede and just turned 90. Her mother was a refugee from Nazi Germany — Sweden was very actively accepting refugee Jews during the war. Photo by Mark Weber — June 2, 2o16.

Alvik train station stop -- 11:25 a.m. May 29, 2o16 Stockholm -- photo by Mark Weber en route to Grondal Krykan

Alvik train station stop — 11:25 a.m. May 29, 2o16 Stockholm — photo by Mark Weber en route to Grondal Krykan

Daughter and mother: Alice Fite and Boel Dirke at home -- May 31, 2o16 -- photo by Mark Weber -- You know Boel from the 2 records she made on New Artists records playing piano (Bob Casanova's FROM THE INSIDE OUT, and the trio record SWEET FULFILLMENT w/ Charley Krachy and her husband Andy Fite) ---- says she only picked up the organ at age 40 and now feels comfortable with it -- She's the organ player and choir director of Grondal Kyrkan ---- They have a nice house, painted yellow, just a little south of the church -- She met Andy in NYC when she came over on a grant to study with Blossom Dearie, but when that didn't pan out she found Liz Gorrill for a teacher, which is nothing but good -- After a couple years in NYC they moved back to her Sweden and Andy says he's been in Stockholm "going on 22 years." (Liz changed her name to Kazzrie Jaxen in 2001.) Alice looks a little like Greta Garbo, who was also born & raised in Stockholm.

Daughter and mother: Alice Fite and Boel Dirke at home — May 31, 2o16 — photo by Mark Weber — You know Boel from the 2 records she made on New Artists records playing piano (Bob Casanova’s FROM THE INSIDE OUT, and the trio record SWEET FULFILLMENT w/ Charley Krachy and her husband Andy Fite) —- says she only picked up the organ at age 40 and now feels comfortable with it — She’s the organ player and choir director of Grondal Kyrkan —- They have a nice house, painted yellow, just a little south of the church — She met Andy in NYC when she came over on a grant to study with Blossom Dearie, but when that didn’t pan out she found Liz Gorrill for a teacher, which is nothing but good — After a couple years in NYC they moved back to her Sweden and Andy says he’s been in Stockholm “going on 22 years.” (Liz changed her name to Kazzrie Jaxen in 2001.) Alice looks a little like Greta Garbo, who was also born & raised in Stockholm.

Niklas Fite on his 1949 Epiphone Broadway that his father Andy had changed to a 7-string and then changed it back before giving it to Nik, so it doesn't have the original neck -- May 29, 2o16 at Grondal Krykan --rehearsal for our gig at Khimaira the next night (Niklas has the LP copy of the renowned Misha Mengelberg 1972 recording playing with his bebop parrot -- ICP 15 -- which, Nik spun for me when were over to their crib for dinner, quite astounding that bird)

Niklas Fite on his 1949 Epiphone Broadway that his father Andy had changed to a 7-string and then changed it back before giving it to Nik, so it doesn’t have the original neck — May 29, 2o16 at Grondal Krykan –rehearsal for our gig at Khimaira the next night (Niklas has the LP copy of the renowned Misha Mengelberg 1972 recording playing with his bebop parrot — ICP 15 — which, Nik spun for me when were over to their crib for dinner, quite astounding that bird)

Eva Lindal, Andy Fite, Boel Dirke, Stockholm -- May 29, 2016 -- photo by Mark Weber

Eva Lindal, Andy Fite, Boel Dirke, Stockholm — May 29, 2016 — photo by Mark Weber

Eva Lindal mugging for the camera with her violin (1855 vintage) -- Eva never holds back, even in rehearsals she goes for it, both times I heard her play Biber's passacaglia on this trip it was so deep and intense it made the air swirl around her like a cyclone -- photo by Mark Weber -- May 30, 2o16 -- (Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber -- Bohemia/Austria 1644-1704)

Eva Lindal mugging for the camera with her violin (1855 vintage) — Eva never holds back, even in rehearsals she goes for it, both times I heard her play Biber’s passacaglia on this trip it was so deep and intense it made the air swirl around her like a cyclone — photo by Mark Weber — May 30, 2o16 — (Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber — Bohemia/Austria 1644-1704)

Every time I hear Andy Fite in a live setting I walk away thinking I just heard the greatest jazz guitarist alive on the planet -- photo by Mark Weber May 29, 2o16 Stockholm -- Andy on his 1950 Epiphone Broadway "and is far and away the greatest guitar I've ever played" -- I was surprised to learn that Andy was born in LaJolla, California and spent the first six years of his life six blocks from the Pacific Ocean (his father was a physicist who played oboe, and his jobs were itinerant) -- I've always thought of him as a product of Pittsburgh, "We landed at Pittsburgh airport on November 14, 1963" -- He studied with the legendary Pittsburgh guitarist Joe Negri -- Attended his first jam session at age 18 at the Zebra Room, run by drummer Spider Ronderelli -- at our gig at Khimaira on the 30th, he and Niklas took off on a version of "Out of Nowhere" that was so deep that Eva and I decided to sit out -- I sure hope to hear the recordings of this concert some day . . . .

Every time I hear Andy Fite in a live setting I walk away thinking I just heard the greatest jazz guitarist alive on the planet — photo by Mark Weber May 29, 2o16 Stockholm — Andy on his 1950 Epiphone Broadway “and is far and away the greatest guitar I’ve ever played” — I was surprised to learn that Andy was born in LaJolla, California and spent the first six years of his life six blocks from the Pacific Ocean (his father was a physicist who played oboe, and his jobs were itinerant) — I’ve always thought of him as a product of Pittsburgh, “We landed at Pittsburgh airport on November 14, 1963” — He studied with the legendary Pittsburgh guitarist Joe Negri — Attended his first jam session at age 18 at the Zebra Room, run by drummer Spider Ronderelli — at our gig at Khimaira on the 30th, he and Niklas took off on a version of “Out of Nowhere” that was so deep that Eva and I decided to sit out — I sure hope to hear the recordings of this concert some day . . . .

Harald Hult, proprietor of ANDRA jazz record shop, one of the greatest jazz records stores I've ever been in, wow, I spent a bundle, but couldn't buy everything I wanted as traveling with vinyl is a hassle -- photo by Mark Weber -- June 1, 2o16 -- Andra, Rodabergsgatan 9, Stockholm -- Big thanks to Andy Fite for pointing me to this gem --This is one of those places you like to just hang out and with other collectors and shoot the breeze, compare notes (they taught me  how to properly pronounce several musicians names, like Arne Domnerus which you pronounce with an accent uncharacteristically for Swedish on the second syllable, thus: Arnay DomNEARus -- I've been playing his records on the radio but saying DOMnerus, which they all got a big laugh out of . . . .)

Harald Hult, proprietor of ANDRA jazz record shop, one of the greatest jazz records stores I’ve ever been in, wow, I spent a bundle, but couldn’t buy everything I wanted as traveling with vinyl is a hassle — photo by Mark Weber — June 1, 2o16 — Andra, Rodabergsgatan 9, Stockholm — Big thanks to Andy Fite for pointing me to this gem — This is one of those places you like to just hang out and with other collectors and shoot the breeze, compare notes (they taught me how to properly pronounce several musicians names, like Arne Domnerus which you pronounce with an accent uncharacteristically for Swedish on the second syllable, thus: Arnay DomNEARus — I’ve been playing his records on the radio but saying DOMnerus, which they all got a big laugh out of . . . .)

I read my poems with both bands this night during two sets -- The Filip Augustson Trio with the remarkable Christopher Cantillo on drums; Eva Lindal, violin; and Filip on bass -- Photos during rehearsal May 30, 2o16 by Mark Weber -- Filip's compositions remind me of the tradition began by pianist Jan Johansson (1931-1968) who worked extensively with all the modernist jazzers in Sweden but by 1960 started using Swedish folk songs as source material for his jazz improvisations. More on Filip in subsequent postings regarding Sweden and jazz.

I read my poems with both bands this night during two sets — The Filip Augustson Trio with the remarkable Christopher Cantillo on drums; Eva Lindal, violin; and Filip on bass — Photos during rehearsal May 30, 2o16 by Mark Weber — Filip’s compositions remind me of the tradition began by pianist Jan Johansson (1931-1968) who worked extensively with all the modernist jazzers in Sweden but by 1960 started using Swedish folk songs as source material for his jazz improvisations. More on Filip in subsequent postings regarding Sweden and jazz.

Kazzrie Jaxen & Virg Dzurinko two Steinways at Outpost Performance Space -- May 6, 2o16 -- photo by Mark Weber -- This is preview of upcoming postings from the Interlace Concerts that happened just before we took flight to Iceland and Sweden, which was my first time ever visit to Europe and my gene pool.

Kazzrie Jaxen & Virg Dzurinko two Steinways at Outpost Performance Space — May 6, 2o16 — photo by Mark Weber — This is preview of upcoming postings from the Interlace Concerts that happened just before we took flight to Iceland and Sweden, which was my first time ever visit to Europe and my gene pool.

15 Comments

  1. Absolutely beautiful writing, it made me feel like I was there! Did any of this get recorded?

  2. Good to hear from you and see what you are up to. We were in Sweden once. Phyllis Gerber

  3. Every time I read one of your posts I shudder at how beautiful and moving they are….combining word and visual art…..truly outstanding. Thanks you very much Mark….Mark Sowlakis aka Markos

  4. wow, whatta travelogue, Mark, good come-hither words to promote travel to Sweden, makes me really wanna BE there–when it doesn’t snow, that is. You’ve written an excellent, easy-going historical essay abt the jazz scene there and the fascinating Swedes you met. Wish i’d’ve read this this evening so’s to sip a martini while I read–but this Earl Grey tea this ever-sunny SoCalifornia morning was refreshing, too…

  5. great picture (verbal and visual) of your trip. thanks mark

  6. Dan Morgenstern

    June 28, 2016 at 3:35 pm

    Great stories, great photos! Spent 18 months in Sweden during WWII as one of the many brought safely there
    from Denmark, mostly in Goteborg (Gothenburg in English) but also in beautiful Stockholm and surroundings.
    Glad you got straight on Domnerus, a great player!

  7. michael vlatkovich

    June 28, 2016 at 6:49 pm

    Very very nice….. some day maybe I will go there……

  8. Hey Mark, Cameron here. Don’t know if you know that I spent two years in Stockholm and speak fluent Swedish. The first year (summer ’63 – summer ’64), I was an exchange student and bought my first instrument in January ’64 — a pretty crappy German plywood for $200-. Then I got a chance to go back for another year in the summer of ’65 and played with George Russell, Don Cherry, Donald Byrd and a bunch of Swedish cats. Changed my life, as you can imagine. Especially Cherry. But maybe you know all this, maybe we talked about it. I don’t remember. Thanks for your beautiful writing — made me very homesick for Sweden! Lots of love, Cam

  9. Yes, Cameron, I got part of this story in May 2o15 when we caught you with Lena Bloch’s Quartet at Kitano and we sat at the bar and talked, I’m glad you refreshed my memory of the details. It must have been a different world back then in Stockholm. All the cats like Ake Persson, Arne Domnerus, Lars Gullin, Alice Babs, Jan Johnason, Bengt Hallberg, Rune Gustafsson, Monica Zetterlund, Nils Lindberg, Rolf Bilberg, Ove Lind, Gosta Theselius, etc et cetera, were all still around and active. I wish I knew then what I know now. At the Kitano (on Park Avenue at 38th Street) I was with Carol Liebowitz and Eva Lindal, who was visiting from Stockholm, and you and Eva talked at length in Swedish, and at one point you asked me, “Mark, do you understand what we’re saying?” And I said No. But, I had been studying Anglo-Saxon so was listening to your word formations, glottals, fricatives, phenomes, dentals, and all that . . . . .VERY INTERESTING. I wish I had taken a photo of you and Eva talking.

  10. ————————————–playlist—————————-
    Swedish Pastry take 2 Jazz Radio Show
    June 30, 2o16
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host: Sven Webersson
    1. Arne Domnerus “The Favour of a Fool”(Benny Carter) — 14june82 Lp CONVERSATION (Polar Music International) w/ Rune Gustafsson(g), George Riedel(b), Gunnar Svensson(p), Petur Ostlund(d)
    2.Lars Gullin Octet “Fedja” –23apr56 –cd Vol. 8 SVENSK JAZZ HISTORIA (Caprice)
    3. Kenneth Fagerlund Quartet “There’s Never Be Another You” –13apr56 — w/Jan Johansson(p) –Vol. 8 SVENSK JAZZ HISTORIA (Caprice)
    4. Bengt Hallberg Ensemble w/ Ake Persson (trombone), Ove Lind (clarinet), Bengt_arne Wallin, trpt) “Blue and Misty” –20apr56
    5. Nils Lindberg “Curbits” — 23may79 — cd SAXES GALORE (Bluebell) w/ Herb Geller, Red Mitchell
    6. Phil Woods & Gene Quill “Dear Old Stockholm” –11sept57 w/ Sonny Dallas(b), Nick Stabulas(d), Bog Corwin(p) cd PHILS TALKS WITH QUILL
    7. Pete Jolly & Jan LUndgren “The Lamp is Low” –Sept.2001 cd COLLABORATION (Fresh Sound)
    8. Hacke Bjorksten’s All Star Sextet “Go Home Swanson” w/ solos by Ake Persson, Rune Gustafsson
    9. Monica Zetterlund “Easy Street” –1958– SWEDISH SENSATION — her first album
    10. Andy Fite plays Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier Book 2 — circa 2o15
    11. Andy & Niklas Fite “Stentatorian Line” — 2o16 preview of upcoming CD
    12. Jan Johansson trio “The definitive new jazz suite” –1957– Vol.8 SVENSK JAZZ HISTORIA
    13. Filip Augustson Trio w/Christopher Cantillo (drums), Eva Lindal (violin) “Turtle Dance” — 2015 cd MINSTA GEMENSAMMA NAMNAREN
    14. Osten Hedenbratts Trio “A Dream of Alice” –1957– Vol. 8 ibid.
    15. Rune Gustafsson w/ Red Mitchell (b), Ed Thigpen (d) “Suicide is Painless” –1976 Lp ON A CLEAR DAY (Sonet)

  11. ———————————–playlist————————-
    The Jet Lag Jazz Radio Show
    June 9, 2o16
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Arne Domnerus “The Midnight Sun Will Never Set” (Quincy Jones) — May 1974 Lp SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN (Grommofon AB Electra)
    2. Paul Chambers “Dear Old Stockholm” –14july57 cd BASS ON TOP (Blue Note)
    3. Rune Gustafsson “Killer Joe” –10aug57 Lp MOVE (Crescendo)
    4. Arne Domnerus Kvintet “Do you want to jump children” –28nov51 cd LARS GULLING volume 6 (Dragon)
    5. Arthur Osterwalls Sextet “The Man I Love” –30march49 w/Lars Gullin, clarinet LARS vol. 6 (Dragon)
    6. Charlie Parker Quintet “Swedish Schnapps” (Charlie Shavers) –8aug51 (Verve)
    7. Stan Getz Swedish All Stars “Flamingo” –24march51 cd LARS GULLIN vol. 6 (Dragon)
    8. as previous “Don’t Get Scared”
    9. Monica Zetterlund w/Lars Gullin Orchestra –9june60 cd DANNY’S DREAM (Bakhall)
    10. Andy Fite & Red Mitchell “What is this thing” –8june91 Live at Jazzklubb Fasching — cd EVERYBODY GOT HAPPY (New Artists)
    11. Lars Gullin Quartet “Darn that Dream” –26jan60 — cd DANNY’S DREAM
    12. Miles Davis “Dear Old Stockholm” –9may52 (Blue Note)
    13. Budd Johnson Quartet “Lester Leaps In” Live at Fasching — 23march78 Lp IN MEMORY OF A VERY DEAR FRIEND (Dragon)
    14. Filip Augustson Trio w/ Eva Lindal(violin) and Christopher Cantillo(drums & percussion) “Ogat”–2015 cd MINSTA GEMENSAMMA NAMNAREN (Found You Recordings)
    15. Arne Domnerus & Rune Gustafsson “Mood Indigo” –August 1990 cd SKETCHES OF STANDARDS (Proprius)

  12. ———————————playlist——————————
    The Swedish Pastry Jazz Radio Show
    June 16, 2o16
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER
    1. Bengt Hallberg solo piano “Stardust/Dinah” –13oct2o12 cd SOLO (Gazell Records)
    2. Stan Getz & His Swedish All Stars “Dear Old Stockholm” –22march51 w/Bengt cd COMPLETE QUARTET SESSIONS 1946-1951 (Blue Moon)
    3. Henry Mancini “Stockholm Sweetnin'” Lp MANCINI ’67 (recorded in 1966)
    4. Rolf Billberg “I can’t believe that you’re in love with me” –7sept57
    5. Lee Konitz “Sound Lee” (Too marvelous for words) –19nov51 Lp SAX OF A KIND Lee Konitz in Sweden (Dragon)
    6. Arne Domnerus Quintet w/Lars Gullin “Moon Over Miami” –28nov51 cd Volume 6 LARS GULLIN (Dragon)
    7. James Moody-Lars Gullin Quintet “Two Feathers” –24jan51cd JAMES MOODY(Fr. Classics)
    8. Lee Konitz “Hi Beck” (Pennies) –5nov83 Lp LIVE IN SWEDEN (Dragon)
    9. Andy Fite & Maurice Kuehn (guitar & bass) “Lady Be Good” — 11nov12 cd BLUE RED (www.jazzbazz.de)
    10. Jan Johansson & Arne Domnerus “Love For Sale” –21nov59 cd YOUNGER THAN SPRINGTIME (Dragon)
    11. Nils Lindberg Septet “‘S’Wonderful” –22june61 cd SYMPHONY No. 1 (Dragon)
    12. Bengt Hallberg & Ove Lind (piano & clarinet duets) “I Guess I’ll Have to Change My Plan” –20dec75
    Lp DIALOGUE IN SWING (Phontastic)
    13. Stan Getz at Nalen — 1959 — “Out of Nowhere” w/ Bengt Hallberg (Riverside Records)

    *all dates refer to the date of recording, not the release of the record

  13. The teeshirt that Janet is wearing on the subway ride was designed by Greg Tucker, an Albuquerque artist, it was a design that was considered for the exterior sign on the Outpost Performance Space back in 2000

  14. Carol Tristano

    July 6, 2016 at 7:34 am

    Love all these beautiful photos!! Digging your stories and am looking forward to the shows via the archives!

  15. Carol Tristano

    July 9, 2016 at 2:14 pm

    Really have enjoyed this show (June 30th). Digging all these wonderful Swedish players – most of whom I didn’t know. Thanks for the preview of Niklas and Andy’s CD – very beautiful and original playing.

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