GOODBYE TO PART OF MYSELF

For about ten or 15 years this was my guide to fill that 75 seconds at the top of 12Noon before bringing in satellite radio ---------- Finding this brings back memories!

For about ten or 15 years this was my guide to fill that 75 seconds at the top of 12Noon before bringing in satellite radio ———- Finding this brings back memories!


One day you just wake up and realize it’s over. Simple as that. It was a long glorious run, my first shows were in August 1996, making it 24 years. Wide listenership, too! The KUNM terrestrial signal nearly blankets the state of New Mexico. But, 24 was enough, really. And streaming on the web nowadays made it worldwide. I interviewed countless numbers of jazz artists: Paul Horn, Fred Katz, Putter Smith, Gary Foster, Bobby Bradford was eloquent and a regular, Curtis Fuller, Vinny Golia, Chris Garcia, Benny Golson, Sheila Jordan many times, Kazzrie Jaxen, Buell Neidlinger, Jesse Sharps, Charley Krachy, Bobby Shew often, the jazz scholar Kirk Silsbee, Carol Liebowitz, Marty Krystal, Arlen Asher, Connie Crothers at least once a year! Andrea Wolper, Terry Gibbs, Bill Payne, Ted Brown, Kali Z Fasteau, Cameron Brown, Sam Newsome & Meg Okura, Hal McKusick, Ernie Andrews every December at Christmas his birthday, Leroy Jenkins, SUE RANEY, Johnny Smith (yes, the renowned guitarist), Mundell Lowe (the other renowned guitarist), Toshiko Akiyoshi, Buddy Collette, Ray Anderson, the magnificent Joshua Breakstone 3 or 4 times, KENNY DAVERN was my co-host during 2005-2006, Gene Cipriano Yo Cip! Lanny Morgan, Nick Lyons, Med Flory of Supersax twice, Janet Feder, Brother JAMES NEWTON (we came up together), Michael Anthony, accordionist Frank Marocco, Johnny Pisano (I got 4 of the original Chico Hamilton Quintet! but Chico got away before I got around), David Parlato, Richard Tabnik, Matt Wilson, Cal Haines, David Sherr, Mark Dresser, Dave Wayne, Robin Eubanks, Eddie Marshall, J.A.Deane, DARYL SHERMAN, Giacomo Gates, Dick Hyman, Butch Morris, Ali Ryerson, William Roper, Henry Franklin, Laurie Pepper curator of Art Pepper’s legacy, Adam Caine, Gildo Mahones, jazz philosopher Dan Morgenstern, Roswell Rudd, Steve Lacy, Charles McPherson, Bill Smith the clarinetist, Anthony Ortega, Warren Smith of M’Boom, poet Todd Moore, Matt Brewer (hilarious as I forgot and left my notes at home!), multiply that by ten and that’s how many guests I had either via telephone or live in-studio. AND all the local vibrant jazz scene, and the Outpost Performance Space w/ Tom Guralnick a regular. And I hope these talks will be useful to future historians, they are all archived at Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, Newark NJ, and at my deposit at UCLA special collections. Live in-studio guests for the most part played their instruments right there in the control room with me.

I suppose it was the Covid Lockdown —- the station went to automation at the end of March (2020) —- and is still running that way for safety, this bug can kill you in a minute. RIP. As of today July 1, 2020) the death toll in the U.S. is 130,390, and worldwide 516,335 and climbing, RIP I’d say “only” 497 deaths in New Mexico but 497 is a lot, and more than half are up on the Navajo Reservation, so much grief. But, having a break from the treadmill made me realize 24 was enough and time for someone else to have some fun.

Others I still wanted to bring to the airwaves in live interviews: Carol Tristano, Jay Clayton, Jerry Bergonzi, Carla Bley, Lenny Popkin, Anthony Braxton, Abdullah Ibrahim, Anita Brown, Ratzo B Harris, John Pizzarelli, local tenor saxophonist Sarah Griego, and anon. Next time!

In production at the time of my decision (many shows mature over time and development): I wanted to do an over-view of boogie woogie; trumpeter/physician Eddie Henderson; the genesis of Coltrane’s “Impressions” which is actually ready to go, very interesting how it came into being; Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra; MORE Zoot! to continue where the late John Breckow left off with our Zoot Sims obsession; and an ethnography on the subculture of local jam sessions which I had been recording . . . . . I’ll sneak onto the airwaves and get those out there, someday.

My only regrets are the artists that won’t see airplay anymore, like my ten favorite pianists: Carol Liebowitz, Kazzrie Jaxen, Virg Dzurinko, Harvey Diamond, Wayne Peet, Connie Crothers, Don Preston, Alan Broadbent, Lennie Tristano, Horace Tapscott, and throw in Cecil Taylor for good measure! I loved turning the listeners on to artists they probably hadn’t heard before, Johnny Guarnieri, Don Byas, Jimmy Wyble, George Van Eps, Bud Freeman, Gigi Gryce, Lorraine Geller, Rob Blakeslee, Billy Lester, Melba Liston, Larry Koonse, George Barnes, Spike Robinson, Gene Bertoncini, Cheryl Richards, Andy Fite, Richie Kamuca, Ernie Krivda, Miff Mole, Joanne Grauer, MICHAEL VLATKOVICH, Marty Grosz, Bucky Pizzarelli, Mary Osborne, ad infinitum. Jazz is a living music as Kenny Davern kept driving into my head. Not that I didn’t know that already, but he was not fond of the idea of “repertoire music.” To him Irving Berlin and Pee Wee Russell were not dated or not right here with us, now.

It was Mark Weaver the tuba maestro who brought me on-board. Mark had the Thursday jazz show for 18 years before me. Seriously, before that I had zero aspirations to be a disk jockey. Sure, I’m a record collector and the notion has percentage in it. Growing up in L.A. I grew up in the golden age of radio and the exuberance and passion that went into music in the Sixties. Then, when FM came around and with that I discovered what radio could be, I lived in the vast suburbs and it was a lifeline. But, it never crossed my mind to be a host, not one whit, I’m a writer, a whole other bag. Which is what I have gained by stepping back, much more brain space to continue working on my jazz book. Selfish, yes, but I’m protective of my brain space and a weekly radio show takes at least 20 hours to prepare, or 40, a lot. I could never do jazz wallpaper radio, I had to respect the art, the listener, and myself, and deliver the best I could, no compromise. It’s no fun otherwise. KUNM afforded me that. I was left alone to deliver my idea of what jazz is. And thank you to General Manager Richard Towne, who was my ally all those years. You need allies. Long live public radio !

 


Playlist from the first months on KUNM when Mark Weaver was shadowing me ---- He knew all the buttons, levers, tubes, dials, switches, lights, faders, etc

Playlist from the first months on KUNM when Mark Weaver was shadowing me —- He knew all the buttons, levers, tubes, dials, switches, lights, faders, etc

Look this guy up, he was everywhere, in all the important NY bands of the 1950s in the woodwinds section, I was the beneficiary of his friendship and knowledge, like Bobby Bradford, he taught me a lot about jazz ---- This is in front of his 300-year-old barn where he did woodworking at his home in Sag Harbor NY ---- August 3, 2011

Look this guy up, he was everywhere, in all the important NY bands of the 1950s in the woodwinds section, I was the beneficiary of his friendship and knowledge, like Bobby Bradford, he taught me a lot about jazz —- This is in front of his 300-year-old barn where he did woodworking at his home in Sag Harbor NY —- August 3, 2011

Kazzrie Jaxen in the Delaware River near her home in Callicoon NY --- View looking upstream ---- It was hot that day and we were in and out of the studio but needed to jump in the water ---- August 7, 2011 ---- photo by Mark Weber

Kazzrie Jaxen in the Delaware River near her home in Callicoon NY — View looking upstream —- It was hot that day and we were in and out of the studio but needed to jump in the water —- August 7, 2011 —- photo by Mark Weber

Ernie Andrews and Plas Johnson at the Dolo Coker Love-In benefit Local 47 Los Angeles March 20, 1983 (Dolo dies April 13 of cancer) ---- Sherman Ferguson(drums), Frank De La Rosa(bass) ---- photo by Mark Weber

Ernie Andrews and Plas Johnson at the Dolo Coker Love-In benefit Local 47 Los Angeles March 20, 1983 (Dolo dies April 13 of cancer) —- Sherman Ferguson (drums), Frank De La Rosa (bass) —- photo by Mark Weber

 John C. Williams (we called him Johnny) the long-time baritone sax for Count Basie AND the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra —- February 10, 1980 —- photo by Mark Weber

John C. Williams (we called him Johnny) the long-time baritone sax for Count Basie AND the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra —- February 10, 1980 —- photo by Mark Weber

Danny Turner of Count Basie Orchestra and my running buddy Harold Howard ---- backstage February 10, 1980 Citrus College, California ---- photo by Mark Weber

Danny Turner of Count Basie Orchestra and my running buddy Harold Howard —- backstage February 10, 1980 Citrus College, California —- photo by Mark Weber

Horace Tapscott ---- January 30, 1977 ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- Horace is L.A., if ever there was a list of ten people who define L.A., Horace would be one of them

Horace Tapscott —- January 30, 1977 —- photo by Mark Weber —- Horace is L.A., if ever there was a list of ten people who define L.A., Horace would be one of them

Two bass players: Ken Filiano & Ratzo Harris ---- September 25, 2009 ---- photo by Mark Weber --- I see this shot daily as it hangs on the wall of our staircase here at Studio 725

Two bass players: Ken Filiano & Ratzo Harris —- September 25, 2009 —- photo by Mark Weber — I see this shot daily as it hangs on the wall of our staircase here at Studio 725

Andy Fite at The Stone, Lower East Side, Manhattan ---- September 17, 2009 ---- photo by Mark Weber

Andy Fite at The Stone, Lower East Side, Manhattan —- September 17, 2009 —- photo by Mark Weber

Playlist from my early days on KUNM

Playlist from my early days on KUNM

The Long Shot Trio backyard concert under the Covid Lockdown high up on Nob Hill, Albuquerque ---- June 20, 2020 ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- Alex Murzyn on 1954 Selmer Super Balance Action tenor; Cal Haines on DW custom drums; Terry Burns, bass ---------- Be sure and go to YouTube under “Cal Haines” listing to see this entire concert on film (by Victoria).

The Long Shot Trio backyard concert under the Covid Lockdown high up on Nob Hill, Albuquerque —- June 20, 2020 —- photo by Mark Weber —- Alex Murzyn on 1954 Selmer Super Balance Action tenor; Cal Haines on DW custom drums; Terry Burns, bass ———- Be sure and go to YouTube under “Cal Haines” listing to see this entire concert on film (by Victoria).

June 20, 2020 the Solstice with the Long Shot Trio and there’s my recording rig, most prominent the Behringer mixer the late Quincy Adams bought me on my 50th birthday, he knowing how much I was going to need this portable mixer in my future, barely does a month pass in these 16 years that I haven’t used it ---- photo by Mark Weber at the controls

June 20, 2020 the Solstice with the Long Shot Trio and there’s my recording rig, most prominent the Behringer mixer the late Quincy Adams bought me on my 50th birthday, he knowing how much I was going to need this portable mixer in my future, barely does a month pass in these 16 years that I haven’t used it —- photo by Mark Weber at the controls

Two saxophonists. This is so real. You send us your Atlantic border easterners out here to the Deep West and they walk around with a squint. That’s Steve Lacy and Tom Guralnick standing in front of the old Outpost Performance Space on Morningside July 18, 1993 ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- Lacy gave an impromptu afternoon solo performance over a remote signal to KUNM --------- When we first moved here (summer 1991) I noticed all the ranchers never wore sunglasses, it just wasn’t part of the culture they came up in, look at the movies from the 60s, Hud doesn’t wear sunglasses, neither does John Wayne. This sun is so bright I think it contraindicated not to wear them. You need eye protection from the Ultraviolet Rays. And wear long-sleeve shirts and hats.

Two saxophonists. This is so real. You send us your Atlantic border easterners out here to the Deep West and they walk around with a squint. That’s Steve Lacy and Tom Guralnick standing in front of the old Outpost Performance Space on Morningside July 18, 1993 —- photo by Mark Weber —- Lacy gave an impromptu afternoon solo performance over a remote signal to KUNM ——— When we first moved here (summer 1991) I noticed all the ranchers never wore sunglasses, it just wasn’t part of the culture they came up in, look at the movies from the 60s, Hud doesn’t wear sunglasses, neither does John Wayne. This sun is so bright I think it contraindicated not to wear them. You need eye protection from the Ultraviolet Rays. And wear long-sleeve shirts and hats.

Summertime in the backyard always feels like childhood. Déjà vu. Stasis. . . . . . Me and the tortoise having watermelon on the second-to-last day of June (2020) while I try to read Marshall McLuhan, interesting stuff, but sort’ve dated, with a preponderance of high-flown surmise and certainties, some of which I chalk up to 1968, others I am merely circumspect not to take them on-board, and still others I’m in complete agreement, his long-standing warnings of a coming “electronic age” in which the medium of delivery will take over from content, and content will be old school, who needs it? Well, he’s the guy we were all reading back then. He’s in his grave now saying I told you so. Photo by Mark Weber

Summertime in the backyard always feels like childhood. Déjà vu. Stasis. . . . . . Me and the tortoise having watermelon on the second-to-last day of June (2020) while I try to read Marshall McLuhan, interesting stuff, but sort’ve dated, with a preponderance of high-flown surmise and certainties, some of which I chalk up to 1968, others I am merely circumspect not to take them on-board, and still others I’m in complete agreement, his long-standing warnings of a coming “electronic age” in which the medium of delivery will take over from content, and content will be old school, who needs it? Well, he’s the guy we were all reading back then. He’s in his grave now saying I told you so. Photo by Mark Weber

30 Comments

  1. Bill Payne

    I am really sorry to hear about this both personally and professionally. You did more for the more lesser known and unknown artist than anybody anywhere. THANK YOU! Your interviews were always inspiring, intelligent and informative to me and receiving that monthly package of cd’s was something I always looked forward to. Thanks again and here’s hoping that we can get together again some time soon…Bill Payne

  2. joan and Fred Voss

    sad sad sad… you were such a fine know-all jazz man artiste… and always will be one way or another… your fans will miss you!

  3. Marty Krystall

    Sorry to see you leave the airwaves. Johnny Williams was a fixture at Glen Johnston’s shop. He was our mouthpiece man. John Carter was there a lot too, and Glen was famous for Dexter Gordon allowing him to reface his mouthpieces. We hung out there for many hours. He had a great attitude, very warm and inquisitive.

  4. Sheila Jordan

    I will miss getting your wonderful messages and photos … Your a great guy indeed. I am so very very sorry to see this incredible information on jazz leave. You did a great job and we need more fantastic friends of jazz like you Mark. Love and best always. xoxoxoxoxo Sheila

  5. Bob Gusch

    Say It Ain’t So

    Say it ain’t so, Joe, please, say it ain’t so
    That’s not what I wanna hear, Joe and I got the right to know
    Say it ain’t so, Joe, please, say it ain’t so
    I’m sure they’re telling us lies, Joe,
    Please, tell us it ain’t so
    excerpt,
    Murray Head 1975

    Thank you, thank you, thank you, for everything.
    I will look forward to reading your jazz book when it comes out and I’m sure we will still be in touch through our music connections.
    Best of luck going forward and we will miss hearing you witty and educational voice on the jazz show.
    Love

  6. Paul Gonzales

    I know how it felt to leave the airwaves but I did a mere 13 years. I always enjoyed your personal way of doing your show. Good back stories on the sessions, unique artist choices, interviews, and poetry. And your documentation (in photos & in writing) and record keeping of things was amazing. It was always nice to get an email from you commenting on one of my shows. Great tips and suggestions. I’ll miss your radio shows. I hope to see you haunting the Outpost and other places when live performances in front of live humans resumes.

  7. Henry Franklin

    I will miss your information, your pure love for the music as I know others will too. I’m thankful that you took time to listen to my music and share it..I know I’ll see you again, so thanks for now. Your friend Henry Franklin

  8. Andrea Wolper

    Mark! It’s the end of an era. Man, you did something great for so many years! You will continue doing great stuff, that’s for sure. And I’m honored as hell to be on that list of guests.

  9. Mike Johnston

    I appreciate and enjoy all of your musical contributions through the years. In terms of writing, photography, radio programs, interviews, poetry performances. Basically making things happen in general. I look forward to your continued contributions and will continue to listen to various recordings that you’ve been a part of.

    Many thanks, Best, Mike Johnston

  10. Steve Schmidt

    Your vast knowledge and diverse taste – deep respect. Thursdays won’t be the same. Your organization, documentation and meticulous notes I envy. See you and Janet on the other side of this.

  11. Harry Norton

    I will truly miss your show more than I could ever put in words with all the information that came with the great music as I will miss our impromptu chats on thursday mornings ahead of your show. I hope to see you at the Outpost when things become more normal…. and maybe I’ll still be able to get you fruit cake when the season comes around.

    Glastonbury

  12. Mel Minter

    Damn, I am so sorry to hear you say you’re leaving. I heard so much music on your show that I never would have heard anywhere else.I love your unmitigated pleasure in the music, whether it’s some smoking trad jazz or the most abstruse extrapolations imaginable. You really expanded my ears.

    Thanks so much, Mark. —Mel

  13. Paul Ingles

    Thank you Mark. I always had a warm feeling seeing you pass by my office heading toward the control room on Thursdays. To me, you epitomize the true spirit of community radio. Opening the door for a true original to step up and become an engaging creative conduit…celebrating the art of others in a thoughtful, respectful, enthusiastic way. In that way, you and I are kindred spirits.

    Thanks for working with me on that New Mexico Jazz series. Great fun…still great results. All should go to newmexicojazz.org to hear Mark’s expert interviews with Kenny Davern and other local jazz luminaries there. I also appreciated your contribution to two of my Beatles specials. Remembering when you first heard I Wanna Hold Your Hand (“play it again”) and when you first heard of the death of John Lennon (strung out on a mattress in a flop in LA). And for you and Janet consistently supporting PEACE TALKS RADIO.

    Great job amigo. Hope to see you here and there someday when I’m actually going here and there again. We’ll set up some 1 on 1 when I can toast you with a ginger ale on ice and thank you in person for your 24 years of selfless devotion to your radio magic. It is magic you know. Throwing voices and music into the air to be heard far and wide by people we usually never meet. That is some magic trick, no?

  14. T. S. O'Sullivan

    You and your show will be sorely missed by jazz fans. Thanks for deepening my understanding of the music and its roots and introducing me to players I might not have otherwise encountered. Happy trails, mi amigo. –Seamus

  15. Dory Breckow-Dutton

    You will be missed Mark, end of an era indeed. Perhaps you will have more time to devote to poetry. I hope you don’t mind if we indulge your followers with this extraordinary Virgil-esque poem Mark Weber penned in 2017, enjoyed by the Breckow-Dutton Clan at STUDIO 111 Corrales, With Love:

    THE HISTORY OF GUITAR SOLOS

    Somebody hammering on their roof
    probably loose shingles, it’s been windy
    and now the dogs barking like idiots
    at the edge of the sea
    After this, there is nothing
    it is wide open: where a guitar solo would go
    contoured in its own melody
    shifts gears, double-clutches, stomps a foot pedal
    the guitarist is holding a souped-up ’55 Chevy
    flames shooting out the back, rubber curling
    speakers emitting butterflies, condors
    We’re circling the Andes
    floating in thermals of sawtoothed notes
    Chuck Berry duck walking
    while a teenager in a London flat
    never knew what hit him: his soul has been taken over
    the TV box and his guitar box
    drift in circles around Stonehenge
    the invasion at Hastings 1066, like to Anglo-Saxons
    he goes underground only speaks this old language
    among rolling stones, old hillforts, the roads
    that lead back to the Druids
    who could see the future of all guitar solos
    speaking exuberance and wild ecstasy

    MARK WEBER 2017

  16. Lauren Camp

    Mark, thanks so much for creating a thoughtfully diverse, smart and entertaining show! and also for teaching me how to broadcast! 24 years, that’s a lot of dedication. We’ll sure miss you on the airwaves.

  17. bayouseco

    Mark,Your dedication to the music you love and to the magic of radio would be almost impossible to replicate. We have been friends for many years, LA guys still in the desert but a little farther from the ocean. It has been a joy to play music with you and to listen to the best jazz show ever. I have learned so much from you. I am still in radio land down here in Silver City, NM trying to expand people’s musical imaginations and their respect for all kinds of music. You have been the person to emulate. Your Albuzerxque series was fantastic and had such a grand variety of music. Thanks for all the music, especially the Bubbadinos, experimental, outside/inside Okie music. See you again when we travel again. Come on down and do a one off at KURU sometime. Love you my brother, Ken

  18. Nels Cline

    Dang, Mark. Love and respect to you, to your abiding love for the music. XO N

  19. Kurt Fisher

    All good things must come to an end. Best regards on our passage and reincarnation to your next stage. Good-bye Pork Pie Hat. – Kurt Fisher https://youtu.be/5IsNHDuwJrM

  20. Mark Weber

    others I interviewed on the Thursday jazz show: Idris Ackamoor, Tootie Heath, Trevor Watts, Robert Creeley, Han Bennink, Michael Moore, Gretchen Parlato, Steuart Liebig, Kris Tiner, Geoff Muldaur, Paul Gonzales, Allan Vache, Jimmy McGriff, Mike Baggetta, Doug Lawrence, Paul Plimley, Bayou Seco, cellist Mike Richmond, David Moss & his dad Roy! Mose Allison, Alex Coke, Chris Calloway, Frank Morgan, Willem Breuker, and the magnificent violinist Iva Bittova

  21. Mary Lance

    Dear Mark, We will miss you on the radio but look forward to seeing you in person! Thank you for the many excellent shows!

  22. Joe Somoza

    Congratulations, Mark. Time to start phase 2. I enjoyed the tapes from your show, wish I had lived in Albuquerque to hear you live.

  23. Wiley

    …and your’e still the greatest Mark.
    Wiley Splinters

  24. David Barsanti

    Thanks Mark for all the years. More than anything I will miss your interviews. No where else in the world can you get that!

    Best
    David

  25. joan and Fred Voss

    You’ve done a great service to jazz and jazz lovers and musicians and poets and all others who love
    jazz, Mark. Thanks! — Fred Voss

  26. Mark Weber

    That carbuncle over Horace’s eye he had removed in 1978, I think at the same time he was in hospital for the aneurism. When I asked him what it was he said, “Impurities in the body.”

  27. Carol Tristano

    Hi Mark. Yes this is truly the end of an era, but the beginning of something new – I am happy you will be free to write and spread your own wings in different ways – something you enabled so many artists to do! Thank you, Mark, for recognizing and supporting so many artists, for sharing your thoughts and knowledge, for ALWAYS being there with freshness, humor, creativity, kindness and insight. Thank you for your original and great poetry. I am moved to have been included in your sphere! Bon continuation as they say in France!! As always, in friendship, Carol

  28. Lynn McKeever

    In this time of all-about-me, Mark was all about the community. With Breckow gone, KUNM was no longer all about me and my taste. My heart has a little ache for Mark and his choices for broadcast, not to mention his knowledgeable interviews and commentaries. I am so pleased that Allison Davis is going to fill John’s Thursday slot and it looks like Albuquerque jazz will survive Covid and the loss of its venues. I am making donations to KUNM and Outpost in honor of Mark Weber.

    • Lynn McKeever

      Sorry for the mistyping. Allison is filling Mark’s Thursday slot and she will do a grand job.

      • Mark Weber

        Thank you, Lynn, that’s very kind. And just for the record: I’m still in the game! You can catch my little updates on FaceBook————-all best to you, MW

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