The Far Sound Of The Blues

Looking west down Lomas Blvd, Albuquerque -- September 16, 2o17 -- photo by Mark Weber

Looking west down Lomas Blvd, Albuquerque — September 16, 2o17 — photo by Mark Weber

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

October 5, 2o17 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

. . . in this music one hears vestiges
                        of the blues, like a palimpsest
faintly seen through the veil
floating
the notes of a minor scale vaporize
over a major chord progression
there is a light wind in the trees
the rustling of leaves
as if the spirits of a doomed army
were passing by
there’s a guy wearing a bandana across
      his brow sanding the fender
of a 1952 Dodge with whitewalls
and curbfeelers
floating iridescence
the notes are like powder, you
can hear them if you cup your ears

Kenny Burrell -- May 9, 1981 Los Angeles ---- photo by Mark Weber

Kenny Burrell — May 9, 1981 Los Angeles —- photo by Mark Weber

I could be wrong but I think Jameel Moondoc assembled this band, it wasn't clear -- November 13, 2016 for Connie Crothers Memorial at Roulette ---- It struck me as the perfect foil for his work: Ras Moshe (tenor), Felice Rosser (electric bass), Reggie Sylvester (alto), On Ka'a David (guitar), and Jameel on alto -- photo by Mark Weber

I could be wrong but I think Jameel Moondoc assembled this band, it wasn’t clear — November 13, 2016 for Connie Crothers Memorial at Roulette —- It struck me as the perfect foil for his work: Ras Moshe (tenor), Felice Rosser (electric bass), Reggie Sylvester (alto), On Ka’a David (guitar), and Jameel on alto — photo by Mark Weber

I was sitting in the front row with Andy Fite when I snapped this one, that's why it came out so interesting: Nick Lyons (alto), Ken Filiano (bass), Lorenzo Sanguedolce (tenor) at the Memorial for Connie Crothers -- November 13, 2o16 at Roulette, 509 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn NYC -- photo by Mark Weber

I was sitting in the front row with Andy Fite when I snapped this one, that’s why it came out so interesting: Nick Lyons (alto), Ken Filiano (bass), Lorenzo Sanguedolce (tenor) at the Memorial for Connie Crothers — November 13, 2o16 at Roulette, 509 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn NYC — photo by Mark Weber

Buddy Rich arrives at Playboy Jazz Festival, Hollywood Bowl -- June 21, 1980 -- photo by Mark Weber ---- One of my favorite Buddy Rich stories comes from David Parlato, who, along around 1968 he got the call to sub one weekend with Buddy's band at the Carousel in Covina, California (remember that place you Angelenos?) (it was right off the San Bernardino Freeway) Anyway, David's all set up with his bass next to the drumkit and they're about ready to hit and Buddy comes out, and sits down at the drums and says to David, "Don't keep it a secret, kid."

Buddy Rich arrives at Playboy Jazz Festival, Hollywood Bowl — June 21, 1980 — photo by Mark Weber —- One of my favorite Buddy Rich stories comes from David Parlato, who, along around 1968 he got the call to sub one weekend with Buddy’s band at the Carousel in Covina, California (remember that place you Angelenos?) (it was right off the San Bernardino Freeway) Anyway, David’s all set up with his bass next to the drumkit and they’re about ready to hit and Buddy comes out, and sits down at the drums and says to David, “Don’t keep it a secret, kid.”

Another great album cover by Burt Goldblatt (1924-2006) ----- He was in the first generation to design covers for LPs -- the first wave of long players were 10" like this one, in 1953 & 1954 (if you visit Institute of Jazz Studies, Newark, you'll see a wall of nothing but 10" albums from those years) ---- For the record, my favorite jazz singer is Jack Teagarden, he's my main man in that department . . . . .

Another great album cover by Burt Goldblatt (1924-2006) —– He was in the first generation to design covers for LPs — the first wave of long players were 10″ like this one, in 1953 & 1954 (if you visit Institute of Jazz Studies, Newark, you’ll see a wall of nothing but 10″ albums from those years) —- For the record, my favorite jazz singer is Jack Teagarden, he’s my main man in that department . . . . .

Gretchen Parlato with her dad's band in Albuquerque: Bob Fox (piano), John Trentacosta (drums), David Parlato (bass), Michael Anthony (guitar) -- April 6, 1998 -- photo by Mark Weber

Gretchen Parlato with her dad’s band in Albuquerque: Bob Fox (piano), John Trentacosta (drums), David Parlato (bass), Michael Anthony (guitar) — April 6, 1998 — photo by Mark Weber

Every time I catch this trio (two times) I'm knocked out, they go straight into that good old-fashioned groove jazz, maybe something like Bobby Timmons or Horace Silver ---- I wish I had a recording of them to play for you ---- Red Hot & Red they call themselves: Steve Figueroa (piano -- his mother Mary is a big jazz nut and is from Laguna Pueblo), Louis Speaking Eagle (Zacatec Indian from El Paso on drums), Milo Jaramillo (Isleta Pueblo on bass) -- June 29, 2o17 at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque -- photo by Mark Weber

Every time I catch this trio (two times) I’m knocked out, they go straight into that good old-fashioned groove jazz, maybe something like Bobby Timmons or Horace Silver —- I wish I had a recording of them to play for you —- Red Hot & Red they call themselves: Steve Figueroa (piano — his mother Mary is a big jazz nut and is from Laguna Pueblo), Louis Speaking Eagle (Zacatec Indian from El Paso on drums), Milo Jaramillo (Isleta Pueblo on bass) — June 29, 2o17 at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque — photo by Mark Weber

What We Live + Leo Smith ---- March 22, 1998 at Outpost Performance Space -- There's a CD released from this performance on Black Saint ---- Larry Ochs, Donald Robinson, Wadada Leo Smith, Lisle Ellis -- photo by Mark Weber

What We Live + Leo Smith —- March 22, 1998 at Outpost Performance Space — There’s a CD released from this performance on Black Saint —- Larry Ochs, Donald Robinson, Wadada Leo Smith, Lisle Ellis — photo by Mark Weber

Jack Casady -- July 10, 2o16 playing with Electric Hot Tuna in Madrid, New Mexico -- photo by Mark Weber ---- One of my early heroes of the electric contrapuntal bass, I learned a lot listening to him ---- I wonder what occasion'd Jack's decision to take up residence on the Island of Jersey off the coast of Normandy? (There's important paleolithic sites of Neanderthals 250,000BP on Jersey)

Jack Casady — July 10, 2o16 playing with Electric Hot Tuna in Madrid, New Mexico — photo by Mark Weber —- One of my early heroes of the electric contrapuntal bass, I learned a lot listening to him —- I wonder what occasion’d Jack’s decision to take up residence on the Island of Jersey off the coast of Normandy? (There’s important paleolithic sites of Neanderthals 250,000BP on Jersey)

One of the great guitarists this side of the Mississippi River: Lewis Winn motivatin' -- September 16, 2o17 Albuquerque ------ We're in negotiations for Lewis to bring his rig down to KUNM some Thursday in October to play for us live over the New Mexico airwaves ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- In our negotiations I had got off on a tangent and was explaining my current love of standards and how that came about, and Lewis suggested that I run it up the flagpole. Here are excerpts from our communiques :

One of the great guitarists this side of the Mississippi River: Lewis Winn motivatin’ — September 16, 2o17 Albuquerque —— We’re in negotiations for Lewis to bring his rig down to KUNM some Thursday in October to play for us live over the New Mexico airwaves —- photo by Mark Weber —- In our negotiations I had got off on a tangent and was explaining my current love of standards and how that came about, and Lewis suggested that I run it up the flagpole. Here are excerpts from our communiques :

Mark,
Now see, if most of THAT rich but surprisingly concise historical run-down was on your KUNM bio… Nothin’ wrong with what’s already there mind ya, multicolored map that it is, and I spect that was your work too. But this one? Well heck slim, even tho I already knew many of your sordid details this oeuvre-view not only added visceral vitae and raison d’extras to my who and why of you but also too more than a few plain old sheets of facts. And the fulsome fleet of fascinating tales continues ad nominum…. [email from Lewis Winn > MW 9/26/2o17]

[Two notes: 1) Lewis is a master of the malapropism and pulls me into that vortex on occasion 2) Right About Now is a trio he works with that is open-ended and free]

Lewt,
Why’nt you do duets with Bobby Shew?
I bet we could talk him into that.
We’d have to pick a Thursday that he was in town.

Barring that, I’d go with duets with Michael Olivola (sp? now you got me all messed up) —– I’m still in my period of romance with Standards/Song Book. It’s where I live.

I love the Right About Now thing, it’s pure jazz. But I have to admit, I came into jazz backwards. I started out with free jazz and the avant garde ——– In high school when I ran out of rock&roll (it were only ten years old back then, if you remember, and there wasn’t that much of it) and I drifted into classical music for a minute but gawd damn I was 19 & 20 at that time I wanted something a little more in your face — classical was too polite and placid. And so here I am a white boy from the suburbs of L.A. dragged screaming into jazz. With rock I was a guitar solo freak. Jerry Garcia 1967-1969 the best, Duane, Zappa, Jeff Beck’s first album, Harvey Mandel’s first album, etc, and so the next thing was saxophone solos in jazz. And of course, always the blues. And Watts was just half hour away and that’s where I lived the years I might shoulda been in collitch —- I were in the blues bars swilling beer and catching Pee Wee Crayton, Lowell Fulson, Eddie Cleanhead Vinson, Big Joe Turner, Charles Brown, Joe Liggins & the Honeydrippers, Shakey Jake, Roy Brown (“Tin Pan Alley”!), Johnny Otis, Mississippi Smokey Wilson, etc etc etcetera ————-Man, you shoulda heard Pee Wee’s second guitarist Evans Walker, that was a BAAD dude (I’ve put photos of him on my webpage) but, he was a down & dirty boozehound (weren’t we all?) and would have been a bad prospect to take into a studio, I’m sure he didn’t live into 1980 he was going down . . . . .

Then I took my studies deeper and started visiting the black churches, and got my hair curled witnessing all that — people speaking in tongues, fainting, screaming, hollaring, walls shaking, drums pounding, testifying, hand to God ———————- I should write about all that someday . . . .

ANYHOO, I’ve always been a graphics artist (I keep it under wraps in Albuquerque) beginning even before kindergarten I (first day of kindergarten I took a Band-Aids tin full of string I had colored and felt important that I show everyone, haha), all through grade school and high school I had my own easels in art class and so forth, won awards (Bronx cheer) (hated that brouhaha), so that by about 9th grade I was totally down with the Dadaists, Surrealists, and Cezanne forwards, and painted abstract expressionist action paintings for several years, and listened vehemently to Stravinsky and Capt Beefheart. SO THAT by the time I switched to jazz I was ready for Ornette, late-stage Coltrane, Albert Ayler, Sun Ra, etc, I was a mondernist totally ——————-

But, in L.A. I had enough sense to go check out other doings like the cool 50s jazz cats that were still in action then out in the Valley (where Shew lived), (I grew up in the Okie lands to the east), and the vibrant Dixieland scene, and etc. (I had read Martin Williams and even tho he was big on Cecil Taylor, who I met when I was 21, he always stressed that we listen to everything else, great scholar that he was, and I still send youngsters to his books.) My photos attest to all this.

Long story short. (Yoga class is looming, I got to run.) I gradually worked my way along until I realized I like song forms and the abstractions / improvisations derived thereof . . . . . SO. I have had a snootful of free jazz to last a lifetime. That was my main thing for years. It was good training, sort of. Opened my ears, that’s for sure. And my late friend Connie Crothers who I worked with for 15 or so years (NYC mostly) was total free, if she had her druthers. She was way off into playing free . . . . . .

BUT & SO, that would be my choice, the standards would be wonderful. Got to run, more later,
MW————–[email > Lewis Winn 9/26/2017]

 

Mark————-
Thank you for the op to storm your air. Methinks later in the mumph would be more bester for moi. Praps that last one, 10/26? Not sure what I’d do but I’ll think o sumpm. I might tap those Right About Now lads to join me tho, would that be acceptable? If not I could see if Michael Oldvioila will be in town. Ain’t made noises with him for a while so that’d be nice. Whatever works. In fact if you have some sort of thematic plan in mind for your show I might be able to serve that some good. Maybe not too but hey, if ya got thots…
Until senility steals our lunch monkey, ————-Lewt the Coot [Lewis Winn email 9/25/2o17 > MW]

Saxophonist Jon Gordon and composer-arranger Maria Schneider at the old Outpost -- March 30, 1998 -- photo by Mark Weber

Saxophonist Jon Gordon and composer-arranger Maria Schneider at the old Outpost — March 30, 1998 — photo by Mark Weber

Filmmaker Eric Brietbart, who I met at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology when we were both part of the book repair crew on Saturday mornings back in the 90s -- He lived out here for about ten years then moved back to NYC -- We became good friends and still keep in touch ---- In this frame he's filming Judson Crews (at a gathering at Wendell Anderson's place) November 26, 1993 Albuquerque ---- He and Mary Lance are New Deal Films production company and you've seen several of their documentaries on PBS, like the Diego Rivera, and the 1904 St Louis World's Fair, among others -- photo by Mark Weber

Filmmaker Eric Brietbart, who I met at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology when we were both part of the book repair crew on Saturday mornings back in the 90s — He lived out here for about ten years then moved back to NYC — We became good friends and still keep in touch —- In this frame he’s filming Judson Crews (at a gathering at Wendell Anderson’s place) November 26, 1993 Albuquerque —- He and Mary Lance are New Deal Films production company and you’ve seen several of their documentaries on PBS, like the Diego Rivera, and the 1904 St Louis World’s Fair, among others — photo by Mark Weber

Don Weber -- photo by his son Mark -- November 1982 Upland California ---- I was lucky, I had good parents, decent people ---- My Dad worked for the post office 28 years and boy, when he retired he had no problem settling into retirement, none of that disorientation and uselessness and depression that I hear assails certain retirees, not my Dad, he was in the easy chair by the next day and never looked back

Don Weber — photo by his son Mark — November 1982 Upland California —- I was lucky, I had good parents, decent people —- My Dad worked for the post office 28 years and boy, when he retired he had no problem settling into retirement, none of that disorientation and uselessness and depression that I hear assails certain retirees, not my Dad, he was in the easy chair by the next day and never looked back

Fresh off the easel ---- Daryl Rogers has been on a Mingus kick lately and calls this "Mingus" says "I still like to do an occasional abstract while listening to jazz"
Fresh off the easel —- Daryl Rogers has been on a Mingus kick lately and calls this “Mingus” says “I still like to do an occasional abstract while listening to jazz”

11 Comments

  1. yo Mark, thanks for being You !
    love,
    billy

  2. In May 2016 I conducted a couple of panels for the L.A. Jazz Institute’s Buddy Rich festival. Saxophonist Bob Mintzer recounted how a couple of weeks after he went onto the band, Buddy called him into his room and told him to shut the door behind him.
    “You Jewish?” Buddy demanded.
    Mintzer cautiously answered in the affirmative.
    Rich fixed him with a steely gaze and said, “Me and you against the band.”

  3. Always enjoy your art. Thanks!

  4. You’re always catching incredible moments with jazz musicians and persons of interest. You’re the best my friend….Love and xoxoxo always…Sheila Jordan

  5. ———————————playlist—————————–
    The Thursday Jazz Show
    October 5, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Benny Golson Sextet — “Reunion (Salute to Birdland)” –23dec57 cd THE MODERN TOUCH (Riverside) Benny’s 2nd album — w/ Kenny Dorham(trumpet), JJ Johnson(trombone), Benny Golson(tenor), Wynton Kelly(piano), Paul Chambers(bass), Charlie Percip(drums)
    2. Bill Stewart Trio “Toad” (Bill is about the right age that this might be a tip of the hat toward Ginger Baker’s drum feature of the same name) — Dec. 2006 cd INCANDESENCE (Pirouet) w/ Bill Stewart(drums), Larry Goldings(B3) —– Mr Stewart really impressed me last week at the Outpost w/ Peter Bernstein & Goldings, I hadda run out and buy a cd of his
    3. Buell Neidlinger Quintet “2300 Skiddo” cd BLUE CHOPSTICKS A PORTRAIT OF HERBIE NICHOLS (K2B2 Records) — July 1994 w/ Hugh Shick(trumpet), Marty Krystall(tenor), Richard Green(violin), Jimbo Ross(viola), Buell(cello)
    4. Jimmy Lyons Quintet “Remembrance” — Sept.1983 cd WEE SNEEZAWEE (Black Saint) w/ Raphe Malik(trumpet), Karen Borca(bassoon), William Parker(bass), Paul Murphy(drums), Jimmy(alto saxophone)
    5. Kenny Burrell Trio “Ain’t Misbehavin'” — Sept. 1978 cd WHEN LIGHTS ARE LOW (Concord) w/ Larry Gales(bass), Carl Burnett(drums), Kenny(guitar)
    6. Sonny Clark Quintet “Blue Minor” 5jan58 cd COOL STRUTTIN’ (Blue Note) w/ Art Farmer(trumpet), Jackie McLean(alto), Sonny(piano), Paul Chambers(bass), Philly Joe Jones(drums) —– *Chambers & Philly Joe were with Miles at this time ** This track was reminded to me by Tom Albach who heard it recently on the Sirius XM station he listens to, the traitor, he gets it on his TV, nevertheless, when the producer of all those important Horace Tapscott records makes a suggestion, I pay attention ——–
    6. Joe Morris 4 “Situation to Be In” –5feb99 cd MANY RINGS (Knitting Factory Records) w/ Karen Borca(bassoon), Andrea Parkins(accordion & sampler), Rob Brown (alto), Joe(guitar)
    7. Buddy Rich Sextet “BR Blues” –August 1961 cd BLUES CARAVAN (Verve) w/ Sam Most(flute), Rolf Ericson(trumpet), Mike Manieri(vibes), Wyatt Ruther(bass), Johnny Morris(piano), Buddy(drums) —-this was his working group of the time
    8. Lewis Winn + Michael Olivola — guitar & bass duet “Polka Dots & Moonbeams” –25july2oo8 private recording —– recorded at Bumblebee Bob’s Baja Grill, Albuquerque
    9. Lighthouse All-Stars “A Big of Basie”(Collette) 25sept56 Live at the Lighthouse w/ Buddy Collette(flute),
    Bob Cooper(oboe), Sonny Clark(piano), Howard Rumsey(bass), Stan Levey(drums)
    10. Lewis Winn + Michael Olivola “Count Me In” ibid. — recorded by MW

  6. ———————————playlist————————————
    The Atomic Bomb Jazz Radio Show
    October 12, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Benny Golson Quartet “Sock Cha Cha” — 26dec62 album FREE (Argo) w/Art Taylor(drums), Tommy Flanagan(piano), Ron Carter(bass) — Benny’s eleventh album since 1957
    2. Jon-Erik Kellso(trumpet) “Once in a While” — (1937 song that was a hit for Tommy Dorsey) –April 2o15 recorded in New Orleans with Evan Christopher(clarinet) and Kerry Lewis(bass) both of New Orleans and Kellso brought guitarist Matt Munisteri with him from NYC —
    both of whom play every Sunday night at the Ear Inn on Manhattan in SoHo near the Holland Tunnel, not unless Matt is on the road with Catherine Russell
    3. Cheryl Richards also singing a 1937 song coincidentally, “A Sailboat in the Moonlight” w/ Nick Lyons(alto) and Adam Caine(guitar) — January 2o15 cd IF NOT FOR YOU (New Artists) a song we know from Billie & Prez’s version of 1937
    4. Rufus Reid & Peter Ind “Quasimodo”(Charlie Parker’s line on “Embraceable You”) at one point they play contrapuntally both lines — Nov.1998 cd ALONE TOGETHER (Wave) — two bass players in duet
    5. Jimmy Rushing “Bei mir bist du schoen” –April 29, 1971 cd THE YOU AND ME THAT USED TO BE (RCA) —– an old Yiddish song from the old country that was adapted in 1937 by Sammy Cahn to American audiences——–killin’ saxes by Budd Johnson(soprano) and Al Cohn(tenor) w/ rhythm section Dave Frishberg(piano), Milt Hinton(bass), Mel Lewis(drums)
    6. Joe Sullivan solo piano “Just Strolling” –8aug35
    7. Lord Buckley “H Bomb” — 1960 album BAD RAPPING OF THE MARQUIS DE SADE (World Pacific)
    * I’ve had this album since I was a teenager having first heard it on KPPC Pasadena California
    8. Kenny Davern Quartet “I Want to Be Happy” –19may2003 cd LIVE AT MILL HILL PLAYHOUSE (Arbors), New Jersey w/ James Chirillo(guitar), Greg Cohen(bass), Tony DeNicola(drums)
    9. Al Grey Sextet — “Matza & Grits” w/ Jack McDuff(B3), Joe Cohn(guitar), Jerome Hunter(bass), Bobby Durham(drums), Jerry Weldon(tenor), Al Grey(trombone) —- a romper of a track to follow a joke I delivered about Trump ( > If brains were dynamite he wouldn’t have enough to blow is brains out)
    10. Benny Golson Quartet “Mad About the Boy” cd FREE ibid.
    11. Lenny Popkin Trio “Salon” –24may2006 cd TIME SET (Lifeline) w/Carol Tristano(drums), Gilles Naturel(bass), Lenny(tenor)
    12. Fred Tompkins title track from his cd ANOTHER PLACE — 2011 — Fred on emu, which he tells me is
    a keyboard sampler (Fred normally plays flutes and piano), in duet with Charlie Dent(drums) * “emu” being short for > emulator

    * You can hear this show on the KUNM.org archive

  7. I will be cupping my ears from here on out! Sorry that I missed the show yesterday– would have loved to have heard all of that!

  8. Hi Mark, dug reading your little history of how you got into jazz. But I must contradict you about Connie. She loved the standards – I don’t believe she preferred free. Her innovations in tune playing are akin to her free playing soul. She said something to me once that was revealing about this subject – but I can’t say it here!

  9. Jon-Erik Kellso

    October 15, 2017 at 6:11 am

    Thanks, Mark!

    That was actually the 1927 William Butler song called “Once In a While,” originally played by Louis Armstrong and his Hot 5, that we recorded,
    not to be confused with the ballad of the same name written in 1937 by Michael Edwards & Bud Green.

    all the best,

    Jon

  10. I noted that Lewis Winn is a master of the malapropism but
    he also employs spoonerisms to the max as well . . . . .

    • That reminds me of a great Redd Foxx joke – I won’t tell it perfectly but you’ll get the idea.
      A guy goes into a bar (or café?) and says “I’d like some kiddly stew”. The waiter says, “You mean kidney stew don’t you!”, and the guy says, “I said kiddly diddle I?”.

      Of course, you gotta hear Redd tell it. He was a comic genius!

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