We’re In Lost Times

I have drove under those freeway signs about ten thousand times coming from Upland (east of L.A.) and in this shot approaching downtown -- May 9, 1981 -- photo by Mark Weber

I have drove under those freeway signs about ten thousand times coming from Upland (east of L.A.) and in this shot approaching downtown — May 9, 1981 — photo by Mark Weber

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

April 19, 2o18 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

WE’RE IN LOST TIMES

[untitled poem]

It was in those last couple winks
that I dreamed I became disconnected
from you, lost and without money
or keys or cell phone I looked
for you in the store you went into
while I sat outside under a table
that had an umbrella, forty-five
minutes and you never came out
so I walked the aisles inside and
there was no you,
well, I could
go for a stroll, allow enough time
that you would return to our apartment
equally wondering and worried what
happen’d to me, you’d say of course
that you were in the store but the
dream didn’t last that long, and I
would have said I looked for you all over

Bobby Bradford Mo'tet at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque -- April 21, 1995 -- Vinny Golia(saxophones), William Jeffrey(drums), Roberto Miranda(bass) -- photo by Mark Weber -- A very good recording of this concert exists -- one track was released on cd compilation ALBUZERXQUE Vol. 26 (2007, Zerx Records 071)

Bobby Bradford Mo’tet at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque — April 21, 1995 — Vinny Golia (saxophones), William Jeffrey (drums), Roberto Miranda (bass) — photo by Mark Weber — A very good recording of this concert exists — one track was released on cd compilation ALBUZERXQUE Vol. 26 (2007, Zerx Records 071)

Ray Pizzi (flute), Frank Marocco (accordion), Jeff Hamilton (drums) @ Dino's Italian Inn, 2055 E. Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, California -- April 30, 1981 -- photo by Mark Weber ---- Back in those days around L.A. we used to call Ray > The Pizza Man

Ray Pizzi (flute), Frank Marocco (accordion), Jeff Hamilton (drums) @ Dino’s Italian Inn, 2055 E. Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, California — April 30, 1981 — photo by Mark Weber —- Back in those days around L.A. we used to call Ray > The Pizza Man

The incomparable Jimmy Cleveland at Watts Towers Jazz Festival -- July 7, 1979 -- photo by Mark Weber -- Jimmy is listed at Tom Lord Jazz Discography playing trombone on 524 recording sessions, from 1950 with Lionel Hampton to 1991 with Teddy Edwards, and that's only the jazz sessions . . . .

The incomparable Jimmy Cleveland at Watts Towers Jazz Festival — July 7, 1979 — photo by Mark Weber — Jimmy is listed at Tom Lord Jazz Discography playing trombone on 524 recording sessions, from 1950 with Lionel Hampton to 1991 with Teddy Edwards, and that’s only the jazz sessions . . . .

Buddy Collette - Fred Katz Quintet ---- May 9, 1981 @ L.A. Press Club, 600 N. Vermont ---- w/ Llew Matthews(paino), Paul Humphrey(drums), Nathan East(bass) -- photo by Mark Weber

Buddy Collette – Fred Katz Quintet —- May 9, 1981 @ L.A. Press Club, 600 N. Vermont —- w/ Llew Matthews (paino), Paul Humphrey (drums), Nathan East (bass) — photo by Mark Weber

One of my favorite alto saxophonists: Lanny Morgan and his Quartet: Barry Zweig(guitar), Bob Maize(bass), Larry Flahive(piano -- was the house pianist at this club), Nick Ceroli(drums), and sitting in on harmonica: Max Geldray -- May 3, 1981 at Gilberto's, Cucamonga, California -- photo by Mark Weber (Note the photo of Supersax over the bandstand)

One of my favorite alto saxophonists: Lanny Morgan and his Quartet: Barry Zweig (guitar), Bob Maize (bass), Larry Flahive (piano — was the house pianist at this club), Nick Ceroli (drums), and sitting in on harmonica: Max Geldray — May 3, 1981 at Gilberto’s, Cucamonga, California — photo by Mark Weber (Note the photo of Supersax over the bandstand)

Dave Wayne applies the bow ---- September 22, 2o12 at Studio Wayne, Santa Fe ---- Recording session that resulted in the cd by Michael Vlatkovich MULTITUDES TELEPATHIC (pfMENTUM 078) ---- photo by Mark Weber

Dave Wayne applies the bow —- September 22, 2o12 at Studio Wayne, Santa Fe —- Recording session that resulted in the cd by Michael Vlatkovich MULTITUDES TELEPATHIC (pfMENTUM 078) —- photo by Mark Weber

Michael Vlatkovich(trombone), Clyde Reed(bass), Dave Wayne(drumset) -- September 22, 2012 -- photo by Mark Weber

Michael Vlatkovich (trombone), Clyde Reed (bass), Dave Wayne (drumset) — September 22, 2012 — photo by Mark Weber

The Joseph Salack - Dan Pearlman Quartet -- November 11, 1996 ---- out of Taos, New Mexico, playing the old Outpost: Dan Pearlman(cornet), Joseph Salack(bass), Raymond Blanchet(tenor), Lee Steck(drums) -- photo by Mark Weber -------- Dan Pearlman is the lyrical horn with Dave Wayne's current band > OrnEtc.

The Joseph Salack – Dan Pearlman Quartet — November 11, 1996 —- out of Taos, New Mexico, playing the old Outpost: Dan Pearlman (cornet), Joseph Salack (bass), Raymond Blanchet (tenor), Lee Steck (drums) — photo by Mark Weber ——– Dan Pearlman is the lyrical horn with Dave Wayne’s current band > OrnEtc.

We sure miss Todd Moore on the Thursday jazz show -- He could put the shadow into Noir Jazz (here's one of his poems) ---- Madrid is an abandoned mining town on the other side of the mountains from Albuquerque where Sixties people took over and re-built and settled, there's quite a scene there nowadays ----- This sign is at The Mine Shaft bar & grill and says: Madrid has no town drunk . . . . . . . Photo by Mark Weber -- February 20, 1998 (Todd got away from us back in 2o10)

We sure miss Todd Moore on the Thursday jazz show — He could put the shadow into Noir Jazz (here’s one of his poems) —- Madrid is an abandoned mining town on the other side of the mountains from Albuquerque where Sixties people took over and re-built and settled, there’s quite a scene there nowadays —– This sign is at The Mine Shaft bar & grill and says: Madrid has no town drunk . . . . . . . Photo by Mark Weber — February 20, 1998 (Todd got away from us back in 2o10)

dynamite

my old man
sd pouring
himself
a shot of
whiskey
there’s fire
in this he
sd holding
the glass
up to
the light
fire &
dreams
& murder
& blood
he dipped
a finger
into the
whiskey
& marked
my fore
head sd
here’s
to all the
ways that
we burn
ourselves
down

A pianist and a saxophonist: Connie Crothers and Jessica Jones -- At Connie's loft in Williamsburg -- September 10, 2o13 ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- I still almost daily remember Connie's dictum to me, "Mark, as long as it's real," when I had been trying to figure my way out of a particular problem with a text I was working on --- She had to remind me of that, often, over the years, it's a good one . . . . (Connie is holding her hand like that because she's been in her kitchen fixing food for the gathering/jam session and her hands were wet)

A pianist and a saxophonist: Connie Crothers and Jessica Jones — At Connie’s loft in Williamsburg — September 10, 2o13 —- photo by Mark Weber —- I still almost daily remember Connie’s dictum to me, “Mark, as long as it’s real,” when I had been trying to figure my way out of a particular problem with a text I was working on — She had to remind me of that, often, over the years, it’s a good one . . . . (Connie is holding her hand like that because she’s been in her kitchen fixing food for the gathering/jam session and her hands were wet)

Von Freeman rehearsal with local hotshots: Bert Dalton(piano), Rickey Malachi(drums), John Belzaguy (bass) -- gig that night at Outpost -- December 13, 1996 ----------- That evening I went to pick up Vonski from his hotel to bring him to gig but he wasn't downstairs as arranged, so I called up to his room, and later when he came down he apologized, "Geez, Markski, I was so asleep I was UNDER the bed!" ---- photo by Mark Weber

Von Freeman rehearsal with local hotshots: Bert Dalton(piano), Rickey Malachi(drums), John Belzaguy (bass) — gig that night at Outpost — December 13, 1996 ———– That evening I went to pick up Vonski from his hotel to bring him to gig but he wasn’t downstairs as arranged, so I called up to his room, and later when he came down he apologized, “Geez, Markski, I was so asleep I was UNDER the bed!” —- photo by Mark Weber

A trio calling themselves Protuberance -- worked around Albuquerque most of the 90s, first as a duet, then a trio, made one fantastic record for Zerx Records: Dave Wayne(drums), Mark Weaver(tuba), Paul Pulaski(guitar) -- February 8, 1998 -- photo by Mark Weber ------ Dave Wayne will be visiting the Thursday jazz show on April 26 to bring us up to speed on what he's been up to lately

A trio calling themselves Protuberance — worked around Albuquerque most of the 90s, first as a duet, then a trio, made one fantastic record for Zerx Records: Dave Wayne (drums), Mark Weaver (tuba), Paul Pulaski (guitar) — February 8, 1998 — photo by Mark Weber —— Dave Wayne will be visiting the Thursday jazz show on April 26 to bring us up to speed on what he’s been up to lately

At the tail-end of this Live broadcast over KUNM Mr Blakeslee had motioned to me to come out of the control room and read a poem or two to fill out the hour ---- I had performed with them before on a few other occasions, out in L.A. and here in New Mex, so it was smooth sailing with my homies: Vinny Golia(woodwinds), Rob Blakeslee(trumpet), Billy Mintz(drums), Ken Filiano(bass), Simon Welter(engineer) -- surprise photos by Rob Kellar as I'd left my camera laying in the control room -- May 24, 1997 ----- You'd think I'd be more recognized for poetry (it's what I do), when Connie Crothers called from NYC distraught that she had just read a book review of an Anthology of Poetry in New Mexico 1960-Present and found that I wasn't in it, and wondered why, I told her that I hang around jazz musicians so am not known to the poetry establishment and I don't think poets listen to jazz (Todd was left out, too, but that was probably because his poetry is too scary)

At the tail-end of this Live broadcast over KUNM Mr Blakeslee had motioned to me to come out of the control room and read a poem or two to fill out the hour —- I had performed with them before on a few other occasions, out in L.A. and here in New Mex, so it was smooth sailing with my homies: Vinny Golia (woodwinds), Rob Blakeslee (trumpet), Billy Mintz (drums), Ken Filiano (bass), Simon Welter (engineer) — surprise photos by Rob Kellar as I’d left my camera laying in the control room — May 24, 1997 —– You’d think I’d be more recognized for poetry (it’s what I do), when Connie Crothers called from NYC distraught that she had just read a book review of an Anthology of Poetry in New Mexico 1960-Present and found that I wasn’t in it, and wondered why, I told her that I hang around jazz musicians so am not known to the poetry establishment and I don’t think poets listen to jazz (Todd was left out, too, but that was probably because his poetry is too scary)

A violist and a bass player: LaDonna Smith and David Parlato ---- LaDonna had just sat in with Stefan Dill's trio Palladium (Stefan-guitar; Courtney Smith-Celtic harp; Alicia Ultan-viola) somewhere downtown Albuquerque -- LaDonna visiting New Mexico, I forgot with what ensemble? -- January 11, 1998 -- photo by Mark Weber

A violist and a bass player: LaDonna Smith and David Parlato —- LaDonna had just sat in with Stefan Dill’s trio Palladium (Stefan-guitar; Courtney Smith-Celtic harp; Alicia Ultan-viola) somewhere downtown Albuquerque — LaDonna visiting New Mexico, I forgot with what ensemble? — January 11, 1998 — photo by Mark Weber

Warne Marsh - Pete Christlieb Quintet at Donte's -- October 7, 1976 -- John Dentz(drums), Lou Levy(piano), Fred Atwood(bass) -- photo by Mark Weber

Warne Marsh – Pete Christlieb Quintet at Donte’s — October 7, 1976 — John Dentz (drums), Lou Levy (piano), Fred Atwood (bass) — photo by Mark Weber

7 Comments

  1. [draft]

    . . . and push my glasses back up my nose
    turning the next page so engrossed
    we find the story so elegant
    so beckoning back from the time
    whence it came
    to tell us of rocking and rhyming
    and things we have forgotten
    that could might seem relevant
    to turn back the loss of elephants
    and the greening of the trees . . . .

    It just goes on and on and on and on
    or, at least we hope so

    Notwithstanding the jackasses that presently
    rule this land, such foreboding
    was first brought to bear
    when the poet Ginsberg howled
    that Moloch was encamped outside our cities
    or even as far back as Jesus who warned us
    that worship of money is not the way
    or Buddha and the ascetics before him
    who only carries one bowl
    thereof each day, and bless that
    rather than this
    ponderous gathering of mountains of money

    Lurching forward into town
    he says put all your money in my cart
    it does not belong to you
    it belongs to me

    And if you don’t, I will soon be king
    and I will come back and put you in that tree
    hanging like an ornament that you should defy me

    For I am Moloch the Poison
    who takes all what he can
    and expects even more —- where have
    you hidden your gold? surely you have more?
    And now that
    I have all the gold, it is not enough
    I want to lord over all decisions
    and all the land and every river shall
    flow toward me with boats laden
    with more gold
    and you will cower and simper before my power
    and I will laugh at your gods and your prayers
    they do no good
    as I am Moloch the Poisoner and I am
    on your TV set

    I’LL STOP this lay right there
    as it is no way to start the day
    so early in the springtime . . . . . . . . . . .

    16april 2o18

  2. Note: a “lay” is something in between a song and a poem ————– that draft (above) was sort of in octo-syllabic 4+4 cadence but got maligned . . . . . . just a draft

  3. I’m pretty sure you snapped the Buddy Collette and Fred Katz pic at an event that was one of Dan McKenna’s Jazz Central presentations, Mark. Dan was one of those often anonymous boosters who keep jazz’s pilot light burning. He presented his one-off recitals/jams at the L.A. Press Club several times each year in the 1980s and they were always imaginative and rewarding: tributes to Bill Evans (with pianists Alan Broadbent, Pete Jolly, Mike Lang, Mike Melvoin and Ross Tompkins) and Eric Dolphy (with Vinny Golia); I got to see guitarist Tiny Grimes once on a McKenna program, and that was a delight.
    I forget now what Dan did for a living but he once told me that he funded his shows with lottery winnings! The last time we spoke he was gravely ill in Hemet, but he gave me a good recollection of Clint Eastwood at Fort Ord, where they both did basic training, for my 2012 feature on Clint’s contribution to jazz in motion pictures for Playboy Jazz. I hope Dan is not entirely forgotten because he extended himself greatly for the music.

  4. bowed cymbals/Arnold Schoenberg and George Gershwin

    in 1909 Schoenberg wrote FIVE PIECES FOR ORCHESTRA
    and asks for the percussionist to bow a cymbal with a cello bow……..

    this info was shared with me by my mentor John Bergamo,
    as, he believed, this was the first time this was ever notated

    he also mentioned that he didnt think the effect could be heard
    in the context it was written for but it is notated there….

    John also shared that when he visited the Schoenberg office/museum
    that there was a bow sitting across his desk and wondered why he had
    a bow as he wasnt a string played, and then he remembered performing
    that piece at Manhattan School of Music, what compelled him to write the
    sonority/timbre???

    we might never know

    and on another note……….

    SCHOENBERG ON GERSHWIN

    “Many musicians do not consider George Gershwin a serious composer. But they should understand that, serious or not, he is a composer – that is, a man who lives in music and expresses everything, serious or not, sound or superficial, by means of music, because it is his native language. There are a number of composers, serious (as they believe) or not (as I know), who learned to add notes together. But they are only serious on account of a perfect lack of humor and soul.”

    “It seems to me that this difference alone is sufficient to justify calling the one a composer, but the other none. An artist is to me like an apple tree: When his time comes, whether he wants it or not, he bursts into bloom and starts to produce apples. And as an apple tree neither knows nor asks about the value experts of the market will attribute to its product, so a real composer does not ask whether his products will please the experts of serious arts. He only feels he has to say something; and says it.”

    “It seems to me beyond doubt that Gershwin was an innovator. What he has done with rhythm, harmony and melody is not merely style. It is fundamentally different from the mannerism of many a serious composer. Such mannerism is based on artificial presumptions, which are gained by speculation and are conclusions drawn from the fashions and aims current among contemporary composers at certain times.

    Such a style is a superficial union of devices applied to a minimum of idea, without any inner reason or cause. Such music could be taken to pieces and put together in a different way, and the result would be the same nothingness expressed by another mannerism.

    One could not do this with Gershwin’s music. His melodies are not products of a combination, nor of a mechanical union, but they are units and could therefore not be taken to pieces. Melody, harmony and rhythm are not welded together, but cast. I do not know it, but I imagine, he improvised them on the piano. Perhaps he gave them later the finishing touch; perhaps he spent much time to go over them again and again – I do not know.

    But the impression is that of an improvisation with all the merits and shortcomings appertaining to this kind of production. Their effect in this regard might be compared to that of an oration which might disappoint you when you read and examine it as with a magnifying glass – you miss what touched you so much, when you were overwhelmed by the charm of the orator’s personality. One has probably to add something of one’s own to reestablish the first effect. But it is always that way with art – you get from a work about as much as you are able to give to it yourself.”

    “I do not speak here as a musical theorist, nor am I a critic, and hence I am not forced to say whether history will consider Gershwin a kind of Johann Strauss or Debussy, Offenbach or Brahms, Lehar or Puccini.”

    “But I know he is an artist and a composer; he expressed musical ideas; and they were new – as is the way in which he expressed them.”

    Arnold Schoenberg

  5. ————————————–playlist—————————-
    all the things jazz is radio show
    April 19, 2018
    KUNM Albuquerque USA
    Host MARK WEBER
    1. Fraser MacPherson Quartet w/ Ed Bickert(guitar) — “You’d be so nice to come home to” — August 1984 Lp JAZZ PROSE (Concord)
    2. Carol Liebowitz – Bob Field — piano & tenor duo “All the things you are” — 13apr94 cd WAVES OF BLUE INTENSITIES (New Artists Records)
    3. Sonny Rollins Trio “Way Out West” –7march1957 w/ Shelly Manne(drums), Ray Brown(bass) — cd WAY OUT WEST (Contemporary) . . . .and there you have it: Sonny Rollins, his inborn nobility and long-earned wisdom
    4. Lou Levy Trio “All the things you are” w/ Harry Babasin(bass), Larry Bunker(drums), Lou(piano) — 23sept54 L.A.
    5. Joe Pass Quartet “Joy Spring” — 6feb64 w/ Mike Wofford(piano), Colin Bailey(drums), Jim Hughart(bass), Joe(guitar) cd LIVE AT THE ENCORE THEATER, Los Angeles
    6. Connie Crothers Trio “All the things you are” — 1974 NYC w/ Joe Solomon(bass), Roger Mancuso(drums), Connie(piano) cd PERCEPTION (Steeplechase)
    7. Dick Twardzik solo “All the things you are” — cd 1954 IMPROVISATIONS (New Artists)
    8. Charlie Parker age 22 “Cherokee” — Sept 1942 in KC w/ Efferge Ware(guitar)
    9. Max Roach Quartet w/ Kenny Dorham(trumpet), George Coleman(tenor), Nelson Boyd(bass), Max(drums) — “KoKo” — 11apr58 cd MAX PLAYS CHARLIE PARKER *Bird composed “KoKo” derived from Cherokee and recorded it for Savoy a mere 26 months after his Kansas City rendering
    10. Ed Bickert & Rob McConnell — guitar & trombone duet — “April in Paris” –1984 Toronto — Lp MUTUAL STREET
    11. Adam Rogers & Dave Binney Quartet — 18feb2o14 cd R&B (Criss Cross) — “Ah-leu-cha”(Bird) — Adam(guitar), Dave(alto), Reuben Rogers(bass), Gerald Cleaver(drums)
    12. Don Byas & Bud Powell “All the things you are” — 15dec61 Paris w/ Pierre Michelot(bass), Kenny Clarke(drums) Bud(piano), Don(tenor) Idrees Sulieman(trumpet) cd produced by Cannonball Adderley
    13. Amina Figarova Quintet “Mad Avenue” [no other information given on promo cd at station] *Amina Figarova Sextet playing this night at the Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque

  6. Dave Wayne’s biography: b. September 22, 1959
    ———————————————————-
    I was born in Philadelphia, PA (USA) where my older brother put the fire in my belly to play music via early exposure to Frank Zappa, Captain Beefheart, Muddy Waters, Gary Burton, and Jimi Hendrix. He also had a garage band & they rehearsed at our house. I used to spy on the drummer & would sneak on to his kit to play when neither he nor my brother were around. I took a few lessons back then (age 8 or 9) but quit when the teacher insisted I play rudiments on a practice pad. Strangely, I cannot stop this very activity today.

    We moved to Florida in 1973. I heard a Bobby Hutcherson track on the radio in DC on the way down that changed my life. I grew up in a place called Pompano Beach. I hated it then, but in retrospect it was actually okay. I did not play at all until my senior year of high school. I tried out for the marching band & was required to take drum lessons. I studied for a year with a guy named Jimmy McArdle who taught me (a natural lefty) to play right-handed. He was the greatest teacher of anything ever. Another nice thing that happened was that the band teacher, who was a real marching band guy, let me practice on the school drum kit after hours. I just had to lock myself in the band room, not let anyone in, and wail to my heart’s content.

    I played off and on through college. I gave the ‘legit’ path some effort, but just wound up getting kicked out of the Furman University percussion ensemble. Then my kit got stolen, so I mostly did not play at all until 1985 or so, when I was in grad school at Virginia Tech. I needed something else to do besides geology, so I bought a kit with my tuition money (put the tuition on my very first Visa card) and 6 months later was playing standards with some local guys. We called ourselves the Jazz Impostors. That got me through grad school! I went to Leeds, England after that on a NERC Fellowship at Leeds University. My intention was to quit drums for good, but after seeing all of the signs for bands looking for drummers over there, I relented and bought a kit. Those were interesting times. I wound up playing everything from Dixie to free improv to rock covers. After 2 years there, I spent a year working at the university of Reno, Nevada. I did not play out at all in Reno, as one needed a union card there to gig, or even just to play at a jam session.

    Found permanent employ at LANL in 1993 and have been in Santa Fe ever since. I did not take another drum lesson until 1996, when I took 6 lessons from the incomparable Woody Thompson. I’m still working through his stuff. I’ve played with a number of innovative and accomplished New Mexico-based artists, including Mark Weaver, bassists Ben Wright, Scott Jarrett, and Zimbabwe Nkenya, saxophonist Chris Jonas, cornetist Dan Pearlman, pianists Robert Muller and Joseph Salack, poets Robert Winson and Mark Weber, and guitarists Tim Gagan, Stefan Dill and Ross Hamlin. I’ve also had the good fortune to perform with touring musicians such as keyboardists Brian Haas (of JFJO) and Thollem McDonas, Cornetist Dan Clucas, guitarist Jeff Platz, saxophonists Andrew Lamb, Rob Brown, Alan Lechusza and Joshua Smith, trombonist Michael Vlatkovich and bassist Clyde Reed. In 2009, I formed my own band – The Things That Are Heard – in order to air out my half-baked ideas concerning the relationship between composition and improvisation in music. Chris Jonas, JA Deane, Mark Weaver & Kate Harlow deserve special mention for encouraging me to write my own music. Also, an hour-long conversation with John Hollenbeck (which I’m sure he won’t remember) on the same topic further inspired me. I’ve been writing since 2008, and several of the groups i’ve been in (besides my own) have played my pieces.

    Particular high points for me, as a musician, have been the groups with Chris Jonas & Molly Sturges (Bing), Robert Muller (Mushi Trio, Wind-Up Birds), Zimbabwe Nkenya (Ziya), Stefan Dill (Stefan Dill Trio), and The Things That Are Heard. I continue to compose and play music for local jazz and jazz-rock groups. We rehearse more than we gig. Currently i’m playing original jazz and jazz-like music with OrnEtc., funky African-inspired groove tunes (all original) with Shake Alert, crazy Middle Eastern / fusion / free jazz / hip hop mashups with Stefan Dill, and there’s a new band in the works with Ross and guitarist Daniel Carlton that doing all-original high energy rock instrumentals. My playing has been documented on a fistful of albums, both privately issued and on labels such as pfMENTUM, Plutonium, Snowdonia, and Zerx. I’m especially proud of the last 2 albums I’ve recorded; “These Times” by OrnEtc. (self-released), and “Hotend: Do Tell Plays the Music of Julis Hemphill” with Do Tell (featuring Dan Clucas and Mark Weaver), for the Italian label Amirani Records.

    In addition to playing music, I’m a husband, father and homeowner, still work full-time as a scientist, maintain a collection of ~8000 records and CDs, run and lift weights non-competetively, and could write liner notes for your next album.

  7. ———————————–playlist—————————
    Inside Outside Jazz Radio Show
    April 26, 2018
    12:06 Noon – 1:30
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER
    Live in-studio guest DAVE WAYNE
    1. theme for show w/MW on piano — 29sept2o10
    2. Vlatkovich Trio “#2B” from “Santa Fe 9-22-2012 Edit roughs” w/ Dave Wayne(drums), Clyde Reed(bass), Michael Vlatkovich(trombone) — recorded by Steve Schmidt
    3. OrnEtc. “Twisted” –April 2o17 cd THESE TIMES w/ Dave Wayne(drums), Chris Jonas(tenor), Dan Pearlman(cornet), Lee Steck(vibes & composition), Noah Baumeister(bass)
    4. OrnEtc. medley of Ornette tunes “T&T + Lonely Woman” –unreleased material — 2o16 (Dave said from
    Chris Jonas’ second concert with the band)
    5. Lisa Gill “Mala Beads for Carmela with Everyday Empathy” — 23apr2o10 concert at Outpost on cd THE STAR POEMS (Zerx 077) w/ MW(hubkaphone), Dave Wayne(drumset), Michael Vlatkovich(trombone & perc.), Lisa (poem)
    6. Bobby Bradford & Hafez Modirzadeh LIVE AT THE OPEN GATE (NoBusiness Records) Lp w/ Mark Dresser(bass) and Alex Cline(drums) *The sound of this recording reminds me of Ornette’s ESP album LIVE AT TOWN HALL (where Bradford had just returned to Texas to find employment and missed being on the concert)—-the reverb on this new Lp is not added on, the Center for the Arts, Eagle Rock, CA, actually sounds like this, I’ve been there) we listened to track “Facet 17″(HM) w/ Hafez on alto, and BB on cornet, in quartet
    7. Lisa Gill w/ Michael Vlatkovich Trio — ibid. — “From the Depths of Archetypal Encounter” *You know, I like Lisa’s poetry, a lot, but I must confess that I don’t always know what it means, or is about —- It has the appearance & sound of being linear and it is certainly a type of narrative . . . . Maybe I’m thinking too much? There’s this thing we in poetry used to say: It means what is says at the time that it is saying it ——- and that seems to be the case with Lisa’s poetry —– her genius is that she is deeply within her thoughts as they move along, like modules of thought —- it’s her mind ticking away —- not exactly ambiguous, but not exactly straight-forward either —- if there’s an over-arching narrative, I’m missing it ———-
    8. Do Tell “Floppy” cd DO TELL PLAYS THE MUSIC OF JULIUS HEMPHILL (Amirani Records) –30dec2014 recorded at Kirk Brown’s Oasis Studios, Edgewood, New Mexico — w/ Mark Weaver(tuba), Dave Wayne(drums), Dan Clucas(cornet)
    9. Protuberance “Selvage”(Weaver) w/ Dave Wayne(drums), Paul Pulaski(guitar), Mark Weaver(tuba) — March 1999 — cd TREATED AND RELEASED (Zerx 019) — Recorded by Quincy Adams in KUNM’s Studio A
    10. duet Michael Vlatkovich & Dave Wayne “Twists and Turns Aside” from EXTRACT” Live at High Mayhem, Santa Fe — December 10, 2005 —- recorded by Steve Schmidt
    **Dave was such a great guest and has such positive upbeat energy I just jumped on and rode the wave

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