And So

Roaring into the city at 9am on the Hampton Jitney approaching the Midtown Tunnel (42nd Street) -- August 6, 2o11 -- photo by Mark Weber

Roaring into the city at 9am on the Hampton Jitney approaching the Midtown Tunnel (42nd Street) — August 6, 2o11 — photo by Mark Weber

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

October 19, 2o17 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

And so,
with regards to nothing more
than a few stones
collected at seashore
now endowed with nostalgia
I keep them as talismans
long and lonely
never allowing loss to
weigh too heavy
or
keep any of us
earth-bound wanderers
threading back to refuge

Believe it or not, that's James Newton with a tenor saxophone ---- October 8, 1976 ---- Balch Auditorium, Claremont Colleges, California ---- James also used a bass clarinet this concert, along with the flute, which has always been his mainstay (although legend has it that in his teenage years he started out on electric bass) --- This was his gig and he brought Tylon Barea(drums) and Glenn Ferris (trombone) regular cohorts during those halcyon days when we all delved into the avant garde ---- (Subsequent generations don't seem to have ever passed through an avant garde stage in their development -- "Paging Dr Freud, there's a Wynton Marsalis here to see you") ---- In those years the practice of multi-instrumentalist gained some currency, especially under the influence of the miracle workers at the AACM, hence the tenor saxophone that James is holding, I would guess the only time he ventured out with that instrument, whereas, he toyed with the bass clarinet for a full year or so, coming from our generation's admiration for Eric Dolphy ---- I'd ask him more specifics but he moved back to Los Angeles in late June 2016 to be with his aging mother, he and JoAnn and their daughter Sydney having lived here in Albuqueruqe (Corrales) for ten years, off & on . . . .

Believe it or not, that’s James Newton with a tenor saxophone —- October 8, 1976 —- Balch Auditorium, Claremont Colleges, California —- James also used a bass clarinet this concert, along with the flute, which has always been his mainstay (although legend has it that in his teenage years he started out on electric bass) — This was his gig and he brought Tylon Barea(drums) and Glenn Ferris (trombone) regular cohorts during those halcyon days when we all delved into the avant garde —- (Subsequent generations don’t seem to have ever passed through an avant garde stage in their development — “Paging Dr Freud, there’s a Wynton Marsalis here to see you”) —- In those years the practice of multi-instrumentalist gained some currency, especially under the influence of the miracle workers at the AACM, hence the tenor saxophone that James is holding, I would guess the only time he ventured out with that instrument, whereas, he toyed with the bass clarinet for a full year or so, coming from our generation’s admiration for Eric Dolphy —- I’d ask him more specifics but he moved back to Los Angeles in late June 2016 to be with his aging mother, he and JoAnn and their daughter Sydney having lived here in Albuqueruqe (Corrales) for ten years, off & on . . . .

Makoto Ozone and his refreshment after the gig at Cleveland Zoo, Cleveland, Ohio, with the Gary Burton Quartet -- August 17, 1986 -- photo by Mark Weber

Makoto Ozone and his refreshment after the gig at Cleveland Zoo, Cleveland, Ohio, with the Gary Burton Quartet — August 17, 1986 — photo by Mark Weber

I recently acquired the Lp BILLY TAYLOR TRIO INTRODUCES IRA SULLIVAN (ABC Paramount) from 1956 and on the first 3 tracks Ira plays trumpet and sounds great, then picks up the alto on the 4th track (side A) and it struck me that trumpet must have been his core instrument as he phrases on the alto like it's a trumpet ---- In this photo it looks like he and Red Rodney are both playing flugelhorns -- March 17, 1982 in North Hollywood at Carmelo's (Jay Anderson, bass) ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- Later, when I voiced this theory on the radio an astute listener called and said that he'd seen an interview where Ira revealed that the trumpet was indeed his first instrument . . . .

I recently acquired the Lp BILLY TAYLOR TRIO INTRODUCES IRA SULLIVAN (ABC Paramount) from 1956 and on the first 3 tracks Ira plays trumpet and sounds great, then picks up the alto on the 4th track (side A) and it struck me that trumpet must have been his core instrument as he phrases on the alto like it’s a trumpet —- In this photo it looks like he and Red Rodney are both playing flugelhorns — March 17, 1982 in North Hollywood at Carmelo’s (Jay Anderson, bass) —- photo by Mark Weber —- Later, when I voiced this theory on the radio an astute listener called and said that he’d seen an interview where Ira revealed that the trumpet was indeed his first instrument . . . .

Michael Anthony Trio + Kanoa Kaluhiwa at Outpost Performance Space -- March 11, 2o10 ---- Michael Anthony(guitar), Milo Jaramilo(bass), Andy Poling(drums), Kanoa Kaluhiwa(tenor) -- photo by Mark Weber

Michael Anthony Trio + Kanoa Kaluhiwa at Outpost Performance Space — March 11, 2o10 —- Michael Anthony(guitar), Milo Jaramilo(bass), Andy Poling(drums), Kanoa Kaluhiwa(tenor) — photo by Mark Weber

I hung out a lot in that room ------- That's guitarist James Chirillo and Kenny Davern in KD's listening room at home in Sandia Park, New Mexico (note the Furtwangler cd box on the shelf -- KD was a major scholar of Furtwangler) ---- December 13, 2004 -- photo by Mark Weber

I hung out a lot in that room ——- That’s guitarist James Chirillo and Kenny Davern in KD’s listening room at home in Sandia Park, New Mexico (note the Furtwängler cd box on the shelf — KD was a major scholar of Furtwangler) —- December 13, 2004 — photo by Mark Weber

Steve Lacy -- November 2, 1997 Albuquerque -- photo & line drawing by Mark Weber

Steve Lacy — November 2, 1997 Albuquerque — photo & line drawing by Mark Weber

Chris Allen and Lewis Winn, vibes and guitar -- May 1, 1998 -- photo by Mark Weber at old Outpost location

Chris Allen and Lewis Winn, vibes and guitar — May 1, 1998 — photo by Mark Weber at old Outpost location

Buster Cooper at the memorial for Blue Mitchell at Local 47 Los Angeles -- June 10, 1979 -- photo by Mark Weber -- This guy could do it all: big band section, small group interaction, studio work, road work, symphony, club dates, Duke Ellington 1962-1969, settled in L.A. by 1973 into the big bands of Gerald Wilson, Bill Berry, Nat Pierce's Juggernaut, etc ---- We'll listen today to the only album Buster Cooper made under his own leadership: E-BONE-IX from 1989 ---- Buster got away from us last year at age 87

Buster Cooper at the memorial for Blue Mitchell at Local 47 Los Angeles — June 10, 1979 — photo by Mark Weber — This guy could do it all: big band section, small group interaction, studio work, road work, symphony, club dates, Duke Ellington 1962-1969, settled in L.A. by 1973 into the big bands of Gerald Wilson, Bill Berry, Nat Pierce’s Juggernaut, etc —- We’ll listen today to the only album Buster Cooper made under his own leadership: E-BONE-IX from 1989 —- Buster got away from us last year at age 87

Two refugees from the studios of Los Angeles: Bud Shank & Michael Anthony ---- April 7, 1997 Albuquerque when Bud was in town to play at the Outpost, where this photo was blinked in the art gallery -- They played on many sessions together in the 70s ---- photo by Mark Weber (driftwood assemblages by Deborah Cole in the Inpost Art Gallery)

Two refugees from the studios of Los Angeles: Bud Shank & Michael Anthony —- April 7, 1997 Albuquerque when Bud was in town to play at the Outpost, where this photo was blinked in the art gallery — They played on many sessions together in the 70s —- photo by Mark Weber (driftwood assemblages by Deborah Cole in the Inpost Art Gallery)

Lewis Winn and the trio Right About Now -- John Bartlit(drums), Jon McMillan(bass) at a filming during my brief career as a host of a TV show about local jazz, filmed here at a black box studio with audience -- August 19, 2o13 Albuquerque -- photo by Mark Weber ---- That guitar looks like a Telecaster, which reminds me of the time Lewis on stage at the Albuquerque Museum Amphitheater some years ago, puts down his Gibson and says to the audience, "Every now and again a man just has to strap on a Fender" ----- Lewis will be visiting the Thursday jazz show on October 26 to play live over the airwaves in-studio in duet with bassist Milo Jaramillo

Lewis Winn and the trio Right About Now — John Bartlit(drums), Jon McMillan(bass) at a filming during my brief career as a host of a TV show about local jazz, filmed here at a black box studio with audience — August 19, 2o13 Albuquerque — photo by Mark Weber —- That guitar looks like a Telecaster, which reminds me of the time Lewis on stage at the Albuquerque Museum Amphitheater some years ago, puts down his Gibson and says to the audience, “Every now and again a man just has to strap on a Fender” —– Lewis will be visiting the Thursday jazz show on October 26 to play live over the airwaves in-studio in duet with bassist Milo Jaramillo

Lewis Winn (bass) sideman job with a group called Zavana under the direction of Peter Gordon (sax) who was teaching at College of Santa Fe during those years -- Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque -- February 20, 1998 w/ Kevin Zoernig (keyboards), and Robbie Rothschild (drums) -- photo by Mark Weber

Lewis Winn (bass) sideman job with a group called Zavana under the direction of Peter Gordon (sax) who was teaching at College of Santa Fe during those years — Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque — February 20, 1998 w/ Kevin Zoernig (keyboards), and Robbie Rothschild (drums) — photo by Mark Weber

Ernie Andrews one of the great singers of jazz -- July 16, 1983 -- photo by Mark Weber

Ernie Andrews one of the great singers of jazz — July 16, 1983 — photo by Mark Weber

The Old Ways ------ photo by Mark Weber -- October 31, 1997 Albuquerque

The Old Ways —— photo by Mark Weber — October 31, 1997 Albuquerque

11 Comments

  1. If anybody can tell me what that poem means, I’d sure appreciate it. Yes, I wrote it, but
    that doesn’t mean I know what it’s about. It woke me up in the middle of the night and
    made me write it down in my bedside journal about 4 weeks ago, there’s much about
    it I don’t understand.

  2. It’s a really great poem Mark! Esp the “threading back to refuge” phrase. I love the photos. Really liked the “OLD WAYS” The Solar drier is all we use. It’s FREE and there is no ironing needed. Not that I ever iron. But it makes the clothes smell really good as well.

  3. So nice to see your pic of The Red Sullivan Show at Donte’s from 1982, Mark. They had been appearing in SoCal since the late 1970s–at the Lighthouse, Carmelo’s and Concerts By The Sea. The pianist at Donte’s was likely Garry Dial and the drummer was probably Steve Bagby–the regulars in the band. That was a very good outfit, as you recall, with sharp Dial arrangements–showcasing two veteran players who still had important things to say in the music. Bebop and jazz standards, modal tunes and current originals were all presented by two mature instrumentalists who had palpable fun playing together.
    Along with your photos of the avant-gardists of the era, it makes me wonder how a certain celebrated New-Orleans-to-Lincoln-Center trumpeter once claimed that nothing of consequence happened in the music during the ’70s. Sounds like some kind of sleeping sickness.

    • yes, windtone has sleeping sickness real bad, as well as being hard of hearing. but he does have a crouching windbag attachment who is also possibly the wortst drummer in the world; so that makes everything ok at Lingam Center !

  4. I used to dig Bud Shank at the Pilgrimage Theatre in LA, an outdoor amphitheater. This was around 1966, when Paul Horn also worked with his quartet there. I was into Paul Desmond at that time. What blew my mind was, after the concert I was hanging with my older friends, who knew the musicians, when we heard Bud’s Porsche had been broken into and all of his woodwinds were stolen. What blew my mind was the fact that he left horns in his car. Even though I was only 15, I knew it was not cool to leave an instrument in the car. Bud lived in the Marina on his boat. He impressed me as being a very cool cat. Living on a boat! Like the James Bond of studio cats. Then a few years later he left the scene, at the height of his popularity. Same as Paul Horn.

  5. I believe that the long lonely stones are a reference to musical instruments, and you feel a loss at not owning enough. After playing the clarinet and woodwinds for over fifty years, I feel secure as a curator of my instruments. I keep them in good playing order and play them all. After I’m gone someone with talent will play them for another 50 years. Perhaps you need a case for your long stones. A converted pistol case would work. On the other hand, perhaps it’s best to display them, since they don’t need a case to keep them in condition.

  6. Hey Mark that’s great how the poem came straight out of your unconscious. I feel like I understand it, but don’t have the words. We need Joan! I do feel it has something to do with being in the moment. Nostalgia can be repressive if you let it, but items like stones (especially stones!), are infused with the centuries, combined with our feeling, which makes them current. Joan and I were just talking about how much we love stones and sea shells. I have a little rock collection and now some sea shells – one from Long Beach too! Anyway, it’s a beautiful poem!

    Also, that’s a great photo of Steve Lacy. When we were moving to Paris (in stages), Steve and Irene were incredibly sweet to us. They were heading back to the States as we were heading here.

  7. joan jobe smith

    October 19, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    hey, mark, carol sent for me in her unconscious, I guess… love yr poem; I get it; you like how you’ve taken something beautiful, meaningful, from anonymity to be admired. i’ll think this poem next time I pick up a lonely stone or seashell. love yr b&w’s…as always…

  8. ———————————playlist————————————-
    the booby-trapped jazz radio show
    October 19, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Jimmy Smith & Wes Montgomery, organ & guitar + the late Grady Tate (d. Oct. 8 aged 85) on drums
    such a cool version of “King of the Road” — 21sept66 —- they mostly played the feeling of the song and
    touch on the melody only obliquely — cd FURTHER ADVENTURES (Verve)
    2. Zoot Sims Sextet w/Al Cohn(dual tenors), George Wallington(piano), Percy Heath(bass), Kail Winding(trombone), Art Blakey(drums) —- 8sept52 “Tangerine”
    3. solo Lennie Tristano “Tangerine” cd LIVE IN COPENHAGEN (Jazz Records) –31oct65
    4. Ernie Andrews “The Jug and I Got Up this Morning” w/Frank Wess(tenor) — 16feb95 cd THE GREAT CITY (Muse)
    5. Zoot Sims Quartet “MacGuffie’s Blues” — 26may83 w/ Jimmy Rowles(piano) cd SUDDENLY IT’S SPRING (Pablo)
    6. Red Rodney Quintet “Marmaduke”(Bird’s line on Honeysuckle) –26may83 cd THEN AND NOW (Chesky) w/ Chris Potter(tenor), Garry Dial(piano), Jay Anderson(bass), Jimmy Madison(drums), Red (flugelhorn)
    7. Buster Cooper & Thurman Green (dual trombones) “Groovin’ High” –Sept.1989 cd E-BONE-IX (BlueLady Records)
    8. Dizzy Gillespie “Caravan” arranged by Clare Fischer — April 1960 cd TRIBUTE TO DUKE ELLINGTON
    9. Bobby Shew Sextet “Bilingual”(Bengt Hallberg) feature for the Shewhorn where Bobby trades with
    himself —- Lp SHEWHORN (Pausa) — 1982 w/ Billy Mintz(drums), Gordon Brisker(tenor), Bill Reichenbach(trombone), Bill Mays(piano), Bob Magnusson(bass)
    10. Steve Lacy Quartet “Rockin’ in Rhythm” —1nov1957 cd SOPRANO SAX (Prestige) w/ Buell Neidlinger(bass), Wynton Kelly(piano), Dennis Charles(drums), Lacy(soprano)
    11. Chuck Redd “On a Slow Boat to China” — May 2005 cd CHUCK REDD REMEMBERS BARNEY KESSEL HAPPY ALL THE TIME (Arbors)
    12. Lewis Winn & Chris Allen, guitar & vibes, “Days of Wine & Roses” just a quiet reflective morning session
    at KUNM in Studio C ———–17june2oo1 ————– not released —– Chris now lives in Ft Collins, Colorado
    13. Kenny Davern Quartet “It’s Tight Like That” –19may2oo3 cd AT THE MILL HILL PLAYHOUSE (Arbors) w/ James Chirillo(guitar), Greg Cohen(bass), Tony DeNicola(drums), Kenny(clarinet)
    14. Ernie Andrews “Time After Time” ibid.

  9. ——————————————–playlist———————————–
    The Birk’s Works Jazz Radio Show *
    October 26, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER
    Guests LEWIS WINN (Alphacaster guitar)
    MILO JARAMILLO (elec. 5-string bass)

    1. Lewis & Milo “Autumn Leaves”
    2. “Have You Met Ms Jones?”
    3. “Turnaround” (Ornette)
    4. “Days of Wine & Roses” in 2 keys
    5. Fred Katz “Main Theme from Little Shop of Horrors” soundtrack –1960
    * I played this to announce that this movie will be at The Guild Cinema this weekend
    and that “my old friend Freddy wrote the music and conducted the sessions” — That’s when
    Lewis commented that I knew everybody and I said well Fred & Lillian lived over in the next
    town from me in L.A. when I was growing up and that I invited myself into their lives, especially
    since Fred was the
    guy who put all that great music to Ken Nordine’s WORD JAZZ that I had been listening to
    since age 16 having been turned on to it by KPPC
    6. “Stella”
    7. “Things Ain’t What they Used to Be”
    * I learned this morning that Milo’s other name is Robert L Jaramillo (FaceBook)
    THEN
    after our show ended, as pre-arranged we 3 performed/read/played my poem
    “What is History?” on Bonnie Brandon Kennedy’s Afternoon Free Form show —
    catch it on the KUNM.org archive
    ** We never did get around to “Birk’s Works” on the show! even as they had it on
    their set list . . . . . time ran out
    ***See Lewis Winn’s FB page for more commentary on this manifestation

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