Growing Up Avant-Garde

David Moss' kit -- February 19, 1999 Outpost, Albuquerque -- photo by Mark Weber

David Moss’ kit — February 19, 1999 Outpost, Albuquerque — photo by Mark Weber

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

March 1, 2o18 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

GROWING UP AVANT-GARDE

In my mind the central figureheads of the 1960 New Thing advance guard avant-garde were Ornette, Cecil, Albert Ayler, Coltrane, Sun Ra, and Dolphy. I was way into that scene. The first Ornette album I owned was THE EMPTY FOXHOLE. That tells you everything you need to know about me: I’m in high school and I’m listening to probably the whackiest record Ornette ever made. I found it in the used bin at Aron’s Records (on Melrose near Fairfax)(in L.A.)(I have to write about Manny Aron someday, he pointed me toward a lot of great music when I was a kid, every time I see my Honegger Pacific 231 I think of him, among others). Anyway, at the time I was into Capt Beefheart, so EMPTY FOXHOLE was not a complete left turn, and of course Zappa. And those long free-form jams of the Grateful Dead. It wasn’t long after that I started in on the ESP catalog —- Manny would special order them for me. They’re such austere records, they sound like cold-water flats in Greenwich Village, these ESP records were never warmed up with reverb, they are the cold hard truth of uncompromising modernists that I aspired to. Everything I knew about New York was gleaned from Jackson Pollock and the abstract expressionists, and Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, WSBurroughs and the Beatnik scene, and all the MacDougal Street folkies like Joan Baez (who I was in love with), when Maynard G Krebs on TV took his date out to listen to the train go by under the moon I totally related to that. Here was Hollywood poking fun and minimizing the Beatnik worldview but it backfired on me, I either missed their mockery, or didn’t care: Take your girl (Joan) out to listen to trains sounded like IT, baby!

Anyway, I’m getting off track here. Where were we? The avant-garde, and my first goatee, beret, and shades, baby. No wonder the cops pulled me over all the time in my turquoise tie-dyed-curtain VW bus.

Jazz is a continuum. And as scholar Bill Shoemaker points out in his new book, the free jazz movement had it’s immediate predecessors in four ground-breaking albums of 1958: 1) Sonny Rollins THE FREEDOM SUITE 2) Max Roach WE INSIST! FREEDOM NOW 3) Ornette’s first album SOMETHING NEW!!! 4) Randy Weston’s UHURU AFRICA —- toss in some Mingus, and that’s the general picture of the times, We’ll explore some little bit of that on today’s radio show.

The Untempered Trio -- April 1, 1993 at Outpost Performance Space (the old Morningside location) ---- Warren Smith (vibes & percussion) and Bill Cole (double-reeds & flutes) -- photo by Mark Weber ---- I have procrastinated so long to interview Warren Smith over his work with Max Roach's M'Boom (I ran into him at Roulette at Connie Crothers Memorial Nov. 13, 2o16 and he agreed to an interview on my radio show but with one thing and another I have dragged along)

The Untempered Trio — April 1, 1993 at Outpost Performance Space (the old Morningside location) —- Warren Smith (vibes & percussion) and Bill Cole (double-reeds & flutes) — photo by Mark Weber —- I have procrastinated so long to interview Warren Smith over his work with Max Roach’s M’Boom (I ran into him at Roulette at Connie Crothers Memorial Nov. 13, 2o16 and he agreed to an interview on my radio show but with one thing and another I have dragged along)

Two of my favorite people I haven't seen in a long time -- poet Cheryl CAT Townsend and impresario Suzanne Degaetano at her bookstore Mac's Backs in Coventry, Cleveland, Ohio -- November 13, 1994 -- photo by Mark Weber ---- Cheryl was the publisher/editor of IMPETUS literary magazine all through the 1980s and 90s

Two of my favorite people I haven’t seen in a long time — poet Cheryl CAT Townsend and impresario Suzanne Degaetano at her bookstore Mac’s Backs in Coventry, Cleveland, Ohio — November 13, 1994 — photo by Mark Weber —- Cheryl was the publisher/editor of IMPETUS literary magazine all through the 1980s and 90s

Don Alias & Oscar Brashear -- June 16, 1984 Playboy Jazz Festival -- photo by Mark Weber ---- Don Alias worked on Joni Mitchell albums 1977-1980 including MINGUS, as well as Miles BITCHES BREW, as well as Jeremy Steig, Tony Williams Lifetime, Airto, Chick, and 351 recording sessions listed at Tom Lord Discography

Don Alias & Oscar Brashear — June 16, 1984 Playboy Jazz Festival — photo by Mark Weber —- Don Alias worked on Joni Mitchell albums 1977-1980 including MINGUS, as well as Miles BITCHES BREW, as well as Jeremy Steig, Tony Williams Lifetime, Airto, Chick, and 351 recording sessions listed at Tom Lord Discography

Alan Lechusza, Anthony Braxton, Chris Jonas -- three saxophonists -- during Anthony's Composer Residency at University of New Mexico -- April 2, 2003 -- photo by Mark Weber

Alan Lechusza, Anthony Braxton, Chris Jonas — three saxophonists — during Anthony’s Composer Residency at University of New Mexico — April 2, 2003 — photo by Mark Weber

George Cables and Sonny Fortune in Albuquerque outside the Farmer's Market on Coal -- I was driving them around on their day off on tour with Frank Morgan -- March 24, 2003 -- photo by Mark Weber -- George Cables needs your help

George Cables and Sonny Fortune in Albuquerque outside the Farmer’s Market on Coal — I was driving them around on their day off on tour with Frank Morgan — March 24, 2003 — photo by Mark Weber — George Cables needs your help

Two saxophonists: Richie Cole and Stan Getz, never the twain shall meet -- Hollywood Bowl -- June 20, 1981 -- photo and line drawing by Mark Weber

Two saxophonists: Richie Cole and Stan Getz, never the twain shall meet — Hollywood Bowl — June 20, 1981 — photo and line drawing by Mark Weber

George Cables needs our help -- That's George with Janet Simon and Bobby Shew -- (George only knows me as Dr Simon's husband, she's a podiatrist and has advised George for years regarding his feet) -- October 4, 2o14 at the Outpost show for The Cookers -- photo by Mark Weber ---- For details see > https://www.gofundme.com/team-george-cables ---- both Janet and Bobby have already donated

George Cables needs our help — That’s George with Janet Simon and Bobby Shew — (George only knows me as Dr Simon’s husband, she’s a podiatrist and has advised George for years regarding his feet) — October 4, 2o14 at the Outpost show for The Cookers — photo by Mark Weber —- For details see > https://www.gofundme.com/team-george-cables —- both Janet and Bobby have already donated

Linda's giving me that look like she's either going to kick my ass, or hug me. She was special. And L.A. is a tough town, I wish she could have conquered her demons, but it didn't work out that way. I had bugged out and was living in Cleveland when I got word that she had passed. There's a lot of sadness in this world. Even though we were friends (she was always after me to do a session together: piano & poetry) I wish I knew more about her. Where did she learn to play piano like that? Was L.A. her home town? Earliest story I know about her was how Horace met her -- She was a nurse in the hospital (early 60s) where he was recovering from I forgot what and one day he opened his eyes and there was this beautiful nurse towering over him. Photo from April 25, 1980 -- Everett Brown Jr and Linda Hill at United Western Studios, Hollywood, recording her one and only album under her own name ---- photo by Mark Weber

Linda’s giving me that look like she’s either going to kick my ass, or hug me. She was special. And L.A. is a tough town, I wish she could have conquered her demons, but it didn’t work out that way. I had bugged out and was living in Cleveland when I got word that she had passed. There’s a lot of sadness in this world. Even though we were friends (she was always after me to do a session together: piano & poetry) I wish I knew more about her. Where did she learn to play piano like that? Was L.A. her home town? Earliest story I know about her was how Horace met her — She was a nurse in the hospital (early 60s) where he was recovering from I forgot what and one day he opened his eyes and there was this beautiful nurse towering over him. Photo from April 25, 1980 — Everett Brown Jr and Linda Hill at United Western Studios, Hollywood, recording her one and only album under her own name —- photo by Mark Weber

Etta James singing her salvation at Johnny Otis' church Sunday morning -- October 14, 1981 -- photo Mark Weber

Etta James singing her salvation at Johnny Otis’ church Sunday morning — October 14, 1981 — photo Mark Weber

Every jazz historian needs make pilgrimage to New Orleans. First time I went was Spring 1978 and I stayed six weeks and slept in flops and roominghouses ($2.50/night! I still have receipts). Summer of 1982 was my only other visit and I was a little more flush this 2-week trip, also, my brother Craig was working as a roustabout on the oil derricks in the Gulf so I had a place to stay. One night I took a cab to see the legendary James Black ---- I get in the cab and tell the (white) cabbie my destination ---- He pauses, then turns around and says: Are you sure? He figures me for an out-of-towner -- I say: Yup, shore am ---- He says: You're not exactly the right color to be in that ward (he's tipping a fellow member of the white race) ---- I say: It's cool ---- He says: It's your funeral ---- We arrive at the address, which is a converted wood frame house in a residential neighborhood: Alice's Keyhole Lounge (2214 S. Clairborne) ---- Cabbie turns around and says: Okay, I'm going to tell you one more time, I wouldn't go in there if I were you ---- I reassure him that the white race is not imperiled and pay him ---- I grew up in scrappy Cucamonga (Okies are crazy) and spent my weekends in the blues bars of Watts, "Dicey" was my middle name ---- And just as I knew it would be: All was happy-to-see-you handshakes and come-right-in (after Alice checked me out through the keyhole). One of the truisms of us music nuts is we're a small club, color is secondary. Ears and a brain are the only requirement for membership. James Black(drums), Mary Bonnett(vocal), Warren Bell Sr(alto), David Torkanowsky(subbing for Eddie Collins on piano), Rusty Gilder(bass) -- July 3, 1982 photo by Mark Weber

Every jazz historian needs make pilgrimage to New Orleans. First time I went was Spring 1978 and I stayed six weeks and slept in flops and roominghouses ($2.50/night! I still have receipts). Summer of 1982 was my only other visit and I was a little more flush this 2-week trip, also, my brother Craig was working as a roustabout on the oil derricks in the Gulf so I had a place to stay. One night I took a cab to see the legendary James Black —- I get in the cab and tell the (white) cabbie my destination —- He pauses, then turns around and says: Are you sure? He figures me for an out-of-towner — I say: Yup, shore am —- He says: You’re not exactly the right color to be in that ward (he’s tipping a fellow member of the white race) —- I say: It’s cool —- He says: It’s your funeral —- We arrive at the address, which is a converted wood frame house in a residential neighborhood: Alice’s Keyhole Lounge (2214 S. Clairborne) —- Cabbie turns around and says: Okay, I’m going to tell you one more time, I wouldn’t go in there if I were you —- I reassure him that the white race is not imperiled and pay him —- I grew up in scrappy Cucamonga (Okies are crazy) and spent my weekends in the blues bars of Watts, “Dicey” was my middle name —- And just as I knew it would be: All was happy-to-see-you handshakes and come-right-in (after Alice checked me out through the keyhole). One of the truisms of us music nuts is we’re a small club, color is secondary. Ears and a brain are the only requirement for membership. James Black (drums), Mary Bonnett (vocal), Warren Bell Sr.(alto), David Torkanowsky (subbing for Eddie Collins on piano), Rusty Gilder (bass) — July 3, 1982 photo by Mark Weber

An enlarged version of this photo hung for years in Dwain's bookstore The Magic Door in Upland, California ---- that's Art Pepper and Dwain Kaiser (who I spoke about in my previous JFM posting) at Donte's, North Hollywood -- January 16, 1982 -- photo by Mark Weber

An enlarged version of this photo hung for years in Dwain’s bookstore The Magic Door in Upland, California —- that’s Art Pepper and Dwain Kaiser (who I spoke about in my previous JFM posting) at Donte’s, North Hollywood — January 16, 1982 — photo by Mark Weber

Jay McShann visits Los Angeles! and brings Claude Fiddler Williams(violin) and Paul Gunther(drums) from Kansas City, and they pick up Angelinos Larry Gales(bass) and Eddie Cleanhead Vinson(alto) -- September 23, 1980 -- Parisian Room -- photo by Mark Weber

Jay McShann visits Los Angeles! and brings Claude Fiddler Williams(violin) and Paul Gunther(drums) from Kansas City, and they pick up Angelinos Larry Gales(bass) and Eddie Cleanhead Vinson(alto) — September 23, 1980 — Parisian Room — photo by Mark Weber

Vinny Golia & Bobby Bradford -- March 30, 2o17 Albuquerque -- photo by Mark Weber

Vinny Golia & Bobby Bradford — March 30, 2o17 Albuquerque — photo by Mark Weber

Han Bennink -- March 23, 2006 -- (those are the Outpost Performance Space drums -- I don't think Han ever travels with a drumset? doesn't he just grab whatever's laying around?) -- photo by Mark Weber at soundcheck

Han Bennink — March 23, 2006 — (those are the Outpost Performance Space drums — I don’t think Han ever travels with a drumset? doesn’t he just grab whatever’s laying around?) — photo by Mark Weber at soundcheck

Bill Shoemaker's latest book JAZZ IN THE 1970s: Diverging Streams (Rowman & Littlefield, 2o18) is a monumental contribution to scholarship -- The 1970s needs be articulated by those of us that lived it, before it all fades away ---- photo of Bill at Studio 725, Albuquerque -- April 20, 2o13 -- line drawing & photo by Mark Weber ---- We will speak with him this day over the telephone, always interesting perspectives and insights, he is the editor of the on-line journal Point of Departure and has published widely over the years on jazz ---- It is important that public radio give voice to these "divergent" endeavors, a sorting through all the ideas, covering an already unpopular art form (jazz) and an even more tendentious variety of the art form (free jazz). A lot of times you can't see the forest for the trees, which is why a book like this is so valuable, Bill Shoemaker takes the time to outline the evolution of the what became free jazz that found its flowering in the 1970s ---- He's astute enough to ground it all in the gestalt of the times, the socio-economic temper, and the concepts of what is art. He situates the early beginnings in the late 1950s with the Freedom civil rights movement, which sort of explains why I always thought the music had leanings more toward politics than it did music. In the 1950s I was still on my pogo stick so a lot of this was only felt later, rather than lived, as I did in the 1970s (I wrote for the avant jazz magazine CODA). I'll have to give him a good-natured hard time why he follows in the footsteps of Gary Giddins fat book VISIONS OF JAZZ: THE FIRST CENTURY(1998) and never mentions Connie Crothers. (The truth about Connie and her work will survive.)

Bill Shoemaker’s latest book JAZZ IN THE 1970s: Diverging Streams (Rowman & Littlefield, 2o18) is a monumental contribution to scholarship — The 1970s needs be articulated by those of us that lived it, before it all fades away —- photo of Bill at Studio 725, Albuquerque — April 20, 2o13 — line drawing & photo by Mark Weber —- We will speak with him this day over the telephone, always interesting perspectives and insights, he is the editor of the on-line journal Point of Departure and has published widely over the years on jazz —- It is important that public radio give voice to these “divergent” endeavors, a sorting through all the ideas, covering an already unpopular art form (jazz) and an even more tendentious variety of the art form (free jazz). A lot of times you can’t see the forest for the trees, which is why a book like this is so valuable, Bill Shoemaker takes the time to outline the evolution of the what became free jazz that found its flowering in the 1970s —- He’s astute enough to ground it all in the gestalt of the times, the socio-economic temper, and the concepts of what is art. He situates the early beginnings in the late 1950s with the Freedom civil rights movement, which sort of explains why I always thought the music had leanings more toward politics than it did music. In the 1950s I was still on my pogo stick so a lot of this was only felt later, rather than lived, as I did in the 1970s (I wrote for the avant jazz magazine CODA). I’ll have to give him a good-natured hard time why he follows in the footsteps of Gary Giddins fat book VISIONS OF JAZZ: THE FIRST CENTURY(1998) and never mentions Connie Crothers. (The truth about Connie and her work will survive.)

14 Comments

  1. I see in Linda Hill’s own liner notes to her album LULLABY FOR LINDA (Nimbus) that she was born October 6 (year?) in El Paso —- moved to Watts when she was 2 —- Her mother was a pianist/organist and all but two of her seven siblings played music, I’m guessing she was the eighth? Her first instrument was cello in Jr high school —- Says she worked as a nurse “after high school I got a job at General Hospital . . . worked there for two thousand years, when lo & behold I come in there one midnight” and Horace Tapscott is a patient on her watch, and within four years the beginnings of the Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra are generating —- Inside the Lp jacket I find an 8×10 sheet of manuscript where Linda & I collaborated on a prose poem: it appears we were at the Watts Towers Jazz Festival summer 1985 when we composed it, among other things we’re noting how odd it is to see Horace on stage with an electric piano . . . .

  2. Linda Hill got away from us July 1987 Los Angeles

  3. Great, Fantastic writing!!! I felt like I was in the cab with you in New Orleans! You mentioned one of my favorite albums of all time “The Freedom Suite!” The music is, to my ears anyway, beyond words. I have listened and listened to this album hundreds of times over the years…The photography is immense!!! Thanks

  4. Linda Hill was badlikeam.f. She could play !!!

    please say hello to Warren Smith for me. we played together in Gil Evans band at Birdland long time aback.

    thanks for being you and remembering the things we were trying to do.

  5. WONDERFUL AS ALWAYS IN EVERY WAY. PEOPLE LIKE MARK WEBER KEEP JAZZ ALIVE. THANKS MY FRIEND. LOVE AND BEST ALWAYS. SHEILA JORDAN.

  6. wow, haven’t seen a pic of Cat Townsend ever… and whatta great one of Etta James… keep on rockin Mark… love these posts! your fab pix are always surprising to see…

  7. Another great post, Mark. Thanks very much.

  8. I attended the Hollywood Bowl on May 16, 2007, to hear Gunther Schuller conduct “Epitaph” by Charles Mingus. It was a stitched-together long-form recital of Mingus pieces, kind of a musical Frankenstein, supposedly the way the Great Man actually conceived them. It smelled a little fishy. But it was a chance to hear the New York cats play Mingus, and that was worth something. It was 22 pieces–with six trumpets (including Jack Walrath and Valery Ponomarev), six trombones (including Conrad Herwig and Frank Lacy), six reeds (including Craig Handy, Steve Slagle and Ronnie Cuber), Howard Johnson on tuba, etc. Somebody dropped a bundle underwriting that tour.
    I was with the late publicist Peter J. Levinson, who knew everybody in the music and seemed to have a gold key to every place I ever accompanied him to. In the bowels of the Bowl’s dressing room area, i found myself face-to-face with Warren Smith, the trap drummer for the Mingus outfit. You’ll be interested to know, Billy, that I thanked him for contributing “Love in The Open” to the Gil Evans Ampex album, and he seemed to appreciate it.

  9. —————————–playlist——————————–
    February 22, 2o18
    The Unwound Jazz Radio Show
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Frank Strazzeri Sextet “Jo Ann”(FS) w/ Gary Barone (trpt), Sam Most (tenor), Sal Nistico (tenor), John Terry (drums), Dave Parlato (bass), Frank (piano) —Lp THAT’S HIM & THIS IS NEW (Revelation) — 29march69
    2. Woody & Boomer aka Michael Anthony(guitar) & David Parlato (elec-bass) “Out of Nowhere” — 20feb2o18 recorded at Studio 725
    3. Kenny Burrell w/ Stanley Turrentine (tenor), Bill English (drums), Ray Barretto (conga), Major Holley (bass), Kenny (guitar) —- “Chitlins con Carne” –21apr67 * I first heard this song of Burrell’s done with harmonica on
    Jr Wells album 1965 album HOODOO MAN BLUES (Delmark) one of my favorite albums off all time
    ** I played this track “Chitlins con Carne” because Pat Malone Trio (w/ Cal Haines & Colin Deuble) plays it on their gigs last Sunday and this coming Sunday at El Farol, Santa Fe, Canyon Road
    4. Pat Malone Trio “Beautiful Love” — 16jan2o12 w/ Cal Haines (drums), Michael Glynn(bass), Pat (guitar)
    5. Woody & Boomer “Footprints” done samba — ibid.
    6. Woody & Boomer “Saudades de Elis” (Toquinho)
    7. Woody & Boomer “Birk’s Works”
    8. interview w/ David Parlato & Michael Anthony — ten minutes
    9. Linda Hill nonet “Lullaby for Linda” title track to her 1981 album on Nimbus Records w/ Adele Sebastian (flute) & Everett Brown Jr (drums) & Aubrey Hart (flute solo)
    10. Charlie Parker Quintet “Embraceable You” –28oct47 w/ Miles, Duke Jordan, Tommy Potter, Max (Dial)
    *I played this to illustrate my theory of where Anthony Ortega jumps off from: Bird’s total free flow outside Gershwin’s melody where he plays only upon the harmony of the song, which reminds me a lot of the starting point for Mr Ortega’s work
    11. Anthony Ortega Trio “Hot House”(Tadd Dameron) –9july2000 w/ Mike Wofford(piano), Joe LaBarbera (drums), Anthony (alto) —-cd SCATTERED CLOUDS (Hatology)

  10. Thanks Mark, always a great read. Now, ….. just waiting for the book.

  11. ——————————-playlist——————————-
    The Divergent Streams jazz radio show
    March 1, 2o18 —————-KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Julius Hemphill “The Hard Blues” — Feb.1972 album COON BID’NESS (Arista)
    *only played first 5 minutes or so as we had a lot of ground to cover before telephone
    interview with Bill Shoemaker
    2. Anthony Braxton Quartet “track one, side one” NEW YORK FALL 1974 (Arista) w/ Kenny Wheeler(trpt), Dave Holland(bass), Jerome Cooper(drums), Anthony(alto)
    *Bill’s suggestion that we play this
    3. Connie Crothers Trio “Three-Way” –7sept74 album PERCEPTION (Steeplechase) contrafact upon “You don’t know what love is”
    4. Derek Bailey – Evan Parker – Han Bennink “Titan Moon” from THE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE LUNGS (psi) — London, 1970 ***George Brooks was visiting my show and called this track “deliberately provocative” haha
    5. Telephone conversation with author BILL SHOEMAKER regarding his book JAZZ IN THE 1970s
    6. Mark Dresser solo string bass “Threaded” –29oct2o16 —– vinyl Lp MODICANA (NoBusinessRecords)
    7. Cecil Taylor solo piano “After All” Lp SILENT TONGUES (Arista) — 2july74 *Shoemaker’s suggestion
    8. Art Ensemble of Chicago “Ja” — May 1978 Lp NICE GUYS (ECM) *Shoemaker’s suggestion

  12. ———————————playlist————————
    The Take An Eccentric Out to Lunch Jazz Radio Show
    March 8, 2o18 ——————–KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Oscar Pettiford “Sonny Boy” –Feb.1960 Copenhagen w/ Bent Axen(piano), Oscar(cello), Erik Moseholm(bass), Finn Fredericksen(drums) cd IN DENMARK (Stunt Records)
    2. Lennie Tristano Sextet “Marionette” — 16may49 w/ Warne Marsh(tenor), Lee Konitz(alto), Arnold Fishkin(bass), Denzil Best(drums), Lennie(piano), Billy Bauer(guitar & composer of Marionette, built on the chords of “September in the rain”)
    3. Carol Liebowitz – Birgitta Flick duo — piano & tenor saxophone “Marionette/September in the Rain” (vocal by Carol) — work-in-progress, sneak preview of upcoming CD — Nov. 2017 NYC
    4. Warne Marsh – Sal Mosca duo — tenor & piano Live at Village Vanguard “Marionette” — 1981 — cd Volume 2 (Zinnia Records)
    5. Wes Montgomery Quartet w/horns + flute (over-dubbed after the fact) “Willow Weep for Me” — Fall 1965 Live at the Half Note—– cd WILLOW WEEP FOR ME (Verve) w/ Wynton Kelly(piano), Paul Chambers(bass), Jimmy Cobb(drums), Wes(guitar)
    6. Janis Borla 6 “Lennie’s Pennies” (Lennie Tristano) –Sept.2o13 cd PROMISES TO BURN w/ Scott Robinson (marvelous tenor solo), Art Davis(trumpet), John McLean(guitar), Bob Bowman(bass), Jack Mouse(drums), Janis(ace vocal, she must have had her Wheaties for breakfast)
    7. Kazzrie Jaxen Quartet “Lennie’s Pennies” —-19jan2o13—-cd QUATERNITY w/Charley Krachy(tenor), Don Messina(bass), Bill Chattin(drums), Kazzrie(piano)
    8. Wes Montgomery “Bumpin'” — May 1967 — cd BUMPIN (Verve)
    9. Lena Bloch Feathery Quartet “Rubato” — 27may2o12 cd FEATHERY (13th Hour Records) w/ Cameron Brown(bass), Dave Miller(guitar), Billy Mintz(drums)
    10. Henry Franklin L.A. Jazz Machine “Bolivian Odyssey” — 2o17 — brand new cd BOLIVIAN ODYSSEY (Skipper Productions) w/ Benn Clatworthy (wow, this tenor player is someone I want to hear MORE from), Sam Hirsh(piano), our good friend Henry Franklin(bass), Yayo Morales(drums)–this cd is loaded!
    11. John Coltrane 5 “Invitation”(Bronislaw Kaper) — 11july58 cd THE STARDUST SESSION (Prestige) w/Red Garland(piano), Paul Chambers(bass), Jimmy Cobb(drums), Wilbur Harden(trumpet/flugel)

  13. Mark Weber

    March 18, 2018 at 3:24 am

    ————————–playlist—————————-
    The Stephen Hawking Memorial Jazz Radio Show
    March 15, 2018
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Jimmy Greene Quartet “Last Summer” w/ Renee Rosnes(piano), Christian McBride(bass), Lewis Nash(drums), Jimmy (tenor) — 2014 cd BEAUTIFUL LIFE in memory of his daughter Ana who was killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School gun slaughter Dec. 14, 2o12 — 28 people died —– First time I caught Mr Greene (b.1975) was when Dick Hyman & Bucky Pizzarelli & Bumblebee Bob brought him to New Mexico to play Lensic in 2o14, and he really caught my attention, a young guy playing that old repertoire with such reality.
    2. Bill Smith w/ Dave Brubeck Quartet (Bill on clarinet, in for Paul Desmond who was taking a short break) –1960 album BRUBECK A LA MODE (Fantasy) “Frisco Fog”
    3. Count Basie Trio “Sandman” w/ Louis Bellson(drums) and Ray Brown(bass) –28aug75 cd FOR THE SECOND TIME (Pablo)
    4. Bud Shank Quartet “Surf for Two” — 1959 soundtrack for movie SLIPPERY WHEN WET w/ Billy Bean(guitar), Gary Peacock(bass), Chuck Flores(drums), Bud(alto) — I just read memoir BARBARIAN DAYS: A SURFING LIFE (2o15) by William Finnegan, which is recommended if you happen to like being around the ocean — thanks to Dr Ben Daitz for tipping to this great book
    5. Stanley Turrentine + The 3 Sounds “Blue Riff” — 16dec60
    6. Paul Bley Trio “Start”(Carla Bley) w/ Barry Altshul(drums), Steve Swallow(bass), Paul(piano) — 1966 Lp CLOSER (ESP)
    7. Billy Mintz Quartet “Relent”(BM) –1feb2o13 cd BILLY MINTZ QUARTET (Thirteenth Note) w/ Roberta Piket(organ), Putter Smith(bass), John Gross(tenor), Billy(drums)
    8. MW’s “Smooth Jazz” gag — created 17april2002 w/ Quincy Adams
    9. Zoot Sims “Let’s Not Waltz Tonight” — 1957 album ZOOT PLAYS TENOR & FOUR ALTOS
    10. Cal Tjader “Invitation” w/ Brew Moore(tenor) — 1956 album LATIN KICK (Fantasy)
    11. Erin McDougald singing “Brother can you spare a dime?” — 2o10/2o17 cd OUTSIDE THE SOIREE
    12. Arne Domnerus – Rune Gustafsson — alto saxophone & guitar duet “Here’s that rainy day” –1990 cd SKETCHES ON STANDARDS (Proprius)
    13. Ted Brown – Konitz Quartet “Smog Eyes” — 1999 cd DIG IT (Steeplechase)
    14. Paul Bley Trio “Ida Lupino”(Carla Bley) — Lp CLOSER
    *Stephen Hawking RIP (1942 – March 14, 2o18)

  14. Hey Mark,
    Just wondering if you have access to any old Nimbus West lps on vinyl? I’ve bought copies of pretty much everything Tom still has in stock but am still looking for about ten more titles. In particular, the Nate Morgan albums, and the first Tapscott Live At Lobero.

    Thanks!

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