Cool & How To Keep It

I think it was Eugene Atget who first discovered the metaphysical imagery of window reflections, shooting in Paris in the 1920s ---- It's almost too easy, and every shot comes out a masterpiece, I just leaned up against a wall in front of Neiman Marcus at noon in downtown San Francisco and fired off two dozen shots, all of them fantastic, of the fantastic, other-worldly -- Photo by Mark Weber, August 12, 1994

I think it was Eugene Atget who first discovered the metaphysical imagery of window reflections,  shooting in Paris in the 1920s —- It’s almost too easy, and every shot comes out a masterpiece, I just leaned up against a wall in front of Neiman Marcus at noon in downtown San Francisco and fired off two dozen shots, all of them fantastic, of the fantastic, other-worldly — Photo by Mark Weber, August 12, 1994

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

August 18, 2o16 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

COOL & HOW TO KEEP IT

The word cool has many meanings — in jazz, one of the great lessons one learns as a player and as a listener is how to keep your cool, don’t rush things, don’t jump the gun — the roof could be caving in, but keep cool — Barbarians are at the gates, but, keep your cool, no amount of hollering is going to help you — I was listening to a Gerry Mulligan nonet the other day that was so complex and delicate that I wondered how many takes it took to get this exceptional nearly six minute version of “All the Things,” it was staggering, and each of the players had to be completely relaxed or it wasn’t going to work, and they were, so amazing — This could not have been done without cool — Lester Young had cool, I think he taught everyone about it, completely floating through the world, playing your part . . . . .

Roswell Rudd and the New Mexico group Bonefied left to right: J.A. Deane, trombone; Jefferson Voorhees, drumset; Gary Sherman, bass trombone; Mark Weaver, tuba; Kurt Heyl, trombone; Roswell, trombone; Steve Feld, extreme right of frame on trombone -- photo by Mark Weber, May 22, 2000 at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque -- Roswell premiered his "Cry of the Petroglyphs" long-form composition

Roswell Rudd and the New Mexico group Bonefied left to right: J.A. Deane, trombone; Jefferson Voorhees, drumset; Gary Sherman, bass trombone; Mark Weaver, tuba; Kurt Heyl, trombone; Roswell, trombone; Steve Feld, extreme right of frame on trombone — photo by Mark Weber, May 22, 2000 at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque — Roswell premiered his “Cry of the Petroglyphs” long-form composition.

Dick Trask (January 2, 1931 - October 15, 2011) was on the scene in Albuquerque since 1973 -- By day he worked as an aerospace consultant, having retired from the Dept of Defense, and posts at Kirkland AFB (Albuquerque) and by night he was a jazzman -- He was a lot of fun, we miss him, and one of the last with a living memory of Charlie Parker, having grown up in New York, Dick spent his halcyon days on 52nd Street, I loved to warm to his stories of Bird -- photo by Mark Weber -- March 31, 1997 at the Outpost (David Parlato, bass)

Dick Trask (January 2, 1931 – October 15, 2011) was on the scene in Albuquerque since 1973 — By day he worked as an aerospace consultant, having retired from the Dept of Defense, and posts at Kirkland AFB (Albuquerque) and by night he was a jazzman — He was a lot of fun, we miss him, and one of the last with a living memory of Charlie Parker, having grown up in New York, Dick spent his halcyon days on 52nd Street, I loved to warm to his stories of Bird — photo by Mark Weber — March 31, 1997 at the Outpost (David Parlato, bass)

Clyde Hankins (1918 - Dec. 18, 2oo6) Born in Texas, grew up in San Diego, worked with Johnny Richards (!) in L.A., lived & played in Albuquerque since early 60s -- line drawing & photo by Mark Weber -- March 31, 1997 -- Seems my conversations with Clyde always revolved around how much he loved to operate big earth movers and Catapillar D9s -- He was a lightning fast guitarist ---- If you know only one thing about Johnny Richards, you know he wrote the masterpiece CUBAN FIRE! for Kenton in 1956 -- an indispensable jazz album of the West Coast

Clyde Hankins (1918 – Dec. 18, 2oo6) Born in Texas, grew up in San Diego, worked with Johnny Richards (!) in L.A., lived & played in Albuquerque since early 60s — line drawing & photo by Mark Weber — March 31, 1997 — Seems my conversations with Clyde always revolved around how much he loved to operate big earth movers and Catapillar D9s — He was a lightning fast guitarist —- If you know only one thing about Johnny Richards, you know he wrote the masterpiece CUBAN FIRE! for Kenton in 1956 — an indispensable jazz album of the West Coast.

Rufus Harley, the jazz bagpiper in New Mexico -- Rufus has made records with Sonny Rollins, Herbie Mann, Sonny Stitt, and several records of his own on Atlantic ---- This quartet: Justin Bransford, bass; Pete Amahl, drums; Tony Cesarano, guitar -- May 27, 1998 photo by Mark Weber

Rufus Harley, the jazz bagpiper in New Mexico — Rufus has made records with Sonny Rollins, Herbie Mann, Sonny Stitt, and several records of his own on Atlantic —- This quartet: Justin Bransford, bass; Pete Amahl, drums; Tony Cesarano, guitar — May 27, 1998 photo by Mark Weber

Two saxophonists: Walt Weiskopf & Robbie Wilkerson -- March 24, 1997 Albuquerque -- photo by Mark Weber

Two saxophonists: Walt Weiskopf & Robbie Wilkerson — March 24, 1997 Albuquerque — photo by Mark Weber

Two lap steel cats: J.A. Deane (aka Bubba D) at Studio 725 (my kitchen) March 9, 1997 and Freddie Roulette in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, August 11, 1979 -- photos by Mark Weber

Two lap steel cats: J.A. Deane (aka Bubba D) at Studio 725 (my kitchen) March 9, 1997 and Freddie Roulette in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, August 11, 1979 — photos by Mark Weber

Mark Weber and pianist John Proulx after the concert (Cal's brother Scott Haines in rear) at Albuquerque Museum Amphitheater -- July 27, 2o15 -- John Proulx Trio that night w/ Cal Haines on drums -- photo by Victoria Rogers

Mark Weber and pianist John Proulx after the concert (Cal’s brother Scott Haines in rear) at Albuquerque Museum Amphitheater — July 27, 2o15 — John Proulx Trio that night w/ Cal Haines on drums — photo by Victoria Rogers

Pete Amahl, on the mend, I was so glad to see him, recently emerged from rehab having weathered a cardiac event earlier this year ---- Pete's a road warrior, one of those behind-the-scenes anonymous cats that puts the music under the big names all over the country, he's used New Mexico as home base since 1972 (he's from Massachusetts) living way out of town in the wilderness ---- I remember when I first got here (1991) the story was of this drummer living in a trailer or a camper out in Cerrillos (Cerrillos is sorta between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, you've seen it many times before if you watch cowboy movies ---- only eccentrics and madmen and outlaws live out there, like Kell Robertson ---- all of us nervous people stick to Santa Fe and Albuquerque with our plague of barking dogs to protect us) ---- Pete would use a Taos Drum turned sideways for his kick (ceremonial drum made from cottonwood at Taos Pueblo) ---- The greatest news is that he has a radio show on the little Madrid station KMRD Mondays 5-7pm called The Amaral Market with Pete Amahl (Madrid is near Cerrillos in the hills, old mining town turned ghost town turned artists hideaway, and outlaw hideout, dangerous out there) ---- And lest we forget, Pete was one of the founding fathers of the New Mexico Jazz Workshop when it sparked off in 1976 ---- Someday I want to hear more about the year or two he left the road and dropped out of society and lived the life of a contemplative sitting next to a lake called Buttermilk on Cape Cod pondering his alarm clock called Big Ben way back in the Sixties -- This photo by Mark Weber, July 10, 2o16 backstage at the Madrid Ball Park where Pete was sideman with the Family Lotus (kick-butt local band) opening for Hot Tuna

Pete Amahl, on the mend, I was so glad to see him, recently emerged from rehab having weathered a cardiac event earlier this year —- Pete’s a road warrior, one of those behind-the-scenes anonymous cats that puts the music under the big names all over the country, he’s used New Mexico as home base since 1972 (he’s from Massachusetts) living way out of town in the wilderness —- I remember when I first got here (1991) the story was of this drummer living in a trailer or a camper out in Cerrillos (Cerrillos is sorta between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, you’ve seen it many times before if you watch cowboy movies —- only eccentrics and madmen and outlaws live out there, like Kell Robertson —- all of us nervous people stick to Santa Fe and Albuquerque with our plague of barking dogs to protect us) —- Pete would use a Taos Drum turned sideways for his kick (ceremonial drum made from cottonwood at Taos Pueblo) —- The greatest news is that he has a radio show on the little Madrid station KMRD Mondays 5-7pm called The Amaral Market with Pete Amahl (Madrid is near Cerrillos in the hills, old mining town turned ghost town turned artists hideaway, and outlaw hideout, dangerous out there) —- And lest we forget, Pete was one of the founding fathers of the New Mexico Jazz Workshop when it sparked off in 1976 —- Someday I want to hear more about the year or two he left the road and dropped out of society and lived the life of a contemplative sitting next to a lake called Buttermilk on Cape Cod pondering his alarm clock called Big Ben way back in the Sixties — This photo by Mark Weber, July 10, 2o16 backstage at the Madrid Ball Park where Pete was sideman with the Family Lotus (kick-butt local band) opening for Hot Tuna.

Jack Casady making some adjustments -- HOT TUNA at Madrid Ball Park, New Mexico, July 10, 2o16 -- Jorma out front ---- These guys were smoking, no histrionics, no rock god posturings, no jumping up & down (well, Jack did do a little of that, but it was all in fun) just pure hardcore psychedelic blues, and with the bass mixed nice and loud (something their record producers need to consider) -- I hope somebody recorded this one as it was one for the ages, nestled in a vale surrounded by hills dotted with junipers and pinon and a sunset on a lavish hot day (producers rented a canopy for all of us, thank gawd) -- photo by Mark Weber

Jack Casady making some adjustments — HOT TUNA at Madrid Ball Park, New Mexico, July 10, 2o16 — Jorma out front —- These guys were smoking, no histrionics, no rock god posturings, no jumping up & down (well, Jack did do a little of that, but it was all in fun) just pure hardcore psychedelic blues, and with the bass mixed nice and loud (something their record producers need to consider) — I hope somebody recorded this one as it was one for the ages, nestled in a vale surrounded by hills dotted with junipers and pinon and a sunset on a lavish hot day (producers rented a canopy for all of us, thank gawd) — photo by Mark Weber

Quarry Farm, summer home of Mark Twain the man who wrote "The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug" -- photo by Mark Weber, August 29, 1996 Elmira, upstate New York (my wife Janet's hometown)

Quarry Farm, summer home of Mark Twain the man who wrote “The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug” — photo by Mark Weber, August 29, 1996 Elmira, upstate New York (my wife Janet’s hometown)

Alas, our dear Ann Menebroker got away from us July 9 ---- One of those poets who represent the consciousness of the world, Charles Bukowski dedicated his book SOUTH OF NO NORTH (1973) to Ann ---- I published a chapbook of hers on my Zerx imprint: MAILBOX BOOGIE (1991) ---- I certainly didn't get the idea to photo authors with their typewriters from Jill Krementz (Kurt Vonnegut's wife) but she has done marvelous work along those lines -- It just naturally occurs to me to photo writers in their writing rooms -- Photo of Ann Menebroker, July 8, 1991 Sacramento, California, by Mark Weber ---- in a way she is America's Anna Akhmatova ----

Alas, our dear Ann Menebroker got away from us July 9 —- One of those poets who represent the consciousness of the world, Charles Bukowski dedicated his book SOUTH OF NO NORTH (1973) to Ann —- I published a chapbook of hers on my Zerx imprint: MAILBOX BOOGIE (1991) —- I certainly didn’t get the idea to photo authors with their typewriters from Jill Krementz (Kurt Vonnegut’s wife) but she has done marvelous work along those lines — It just naturally occurs to me to photo writers in their writing rooms — Photo of Ann Menebroker, July 8, 1991 Sacramento, California, by Mark Weber —- in a way she is America’s Anna Akhmatova —-

Here’s one of her poems:

TURTLE MAN

The turtle man writes me about the dog, Lucy,
getting old and beginning to limp, and how his
friend, Wolfgang, in Germany, caught the train
to Paris for the ping-pong games. “Wouldn’t it
be nice,” turtle man says, “to be a train ride away
from Paris?” Then he spoke of Radar, the cat, who
recently got neutered and how he refuses
to look at any of the family, or allow them
near him. In answer I, the dog girl of summer,
write back and tell him how my barking
annoys the neighbors and how it used to be
when I thought about more than food or barking.
The BART goes underneath the bay
from Oakland to San Francisco. I lick water
from my bowl.

8:30am Connie Crothers' studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn --photo by Mark Weber -- September 11, 2o13 ---- I remember when her first record came out and I didn't know much of anything about her, being that I grew up in Los Angeles area, I put that record on the turntable one Saturday early afternoon and it blew my mind -- Sorrows this day that she passed on toward Yellow Springs early this morning 4 a.m. (RIP August 13, 2o16 in NYC) --------------------------poem I wrote yesterday . . . . . . .

8:30am Connie Crothers’ studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn –photo by Mark Weber — September 11, 2o13 —- I remember when her first record came out and I didn’t know much of anything about her, being that I grew up in Los Angeles area, I put that record on the turntable one Saturday early afternoon and it blew my mind — Sorrows this day that she passed on toward Yellow Springs early this morning 4 a.m. (RIP August 13, 2o16 in NYC) ————————–poem I wrote yesterday . . . . . . .

ONTOLOGY IN YELLOW SPRINGS

Looking at photos of Bellevue Hospital’s monolithic exterior
and thinking of Connie in there somewhere —
with that highway winding up alongside the East River
at 26th Street only blocks away from Lennie’s 317 E 32nd Street studio —
New York will not be the same without Connie —
I’ve been reading ancient forlorn Chinese poetry, at least, it seems
forlorn to me this morning —
the summer stillness, the cooing of mourning doves, little
finches, a soft breeze, Earl Grey, the first time I ever saw tea
leaves brewed openly in a pot was when Connie set her teapot
in front of me on the table in her studio some years ago, up till then
I had always used a tea ball or a basket strainer, it had
never occurred to me how much more effective
and sensible it was to let the leaves float free

——-MW
12aug2o16

14 Comments

  1. Kevin (just Kevin)

    August 14, 2016 at 6:55 pm

    Rest in Peace, Connie: your music will live forever, your love will live forever …

  2. FOR THE AGES

    Remember when you were a kid
    and you imagined that
    departed family members were watching you
    looking down from Heaven?

    And pulling petals off a flower, “She loves me,
    she loves me not,” if it ended on “not”
    well then, you’d pick another flower
    and start over . . . .

    And a train whistle way off in the distance
    made you think of the past, like it
    was receding . . . .

    Or, sitting by the pigeon coop
    in summer just before the sun went down,
    you could hear five miles away the baseball
    game over the ballpark speakers . . . .

    Even as we paid no attention to the admonition
    about stepping on cracks (probably because there
    weren’t a whole lot of sidewalks in Cucamonga) —-
    we kids always knew what was superstition
    and what was not —-
    worrying about cracks was folly but not
    the echo of a train
    in eternity

    (There’s a beautiful piano made of red wood
    on a flatbed gondola, a shadow
    interlocking her melodies with the clacking of the tracks
    as the train heads toward the coast and the Undying Lands)

  3. Hey Mark

    That photo is so poignant now that Connie has left. She was a friend and always lit up the room with positive energy when she appeared. The times I made music with her were splendid. Your photo shows just how empty the room is without her spirit. Now it’s up to us to carry that spirit forward…

  4. Thanks for the beautiful Connie tribute. Very sad indeed. She was at every concert I ever did in NY. A very very loyal friend and so special. I will miss her a lot. Love and best Mark. Sheila.

  5. David Sherr

    August 16, 2016 at 3:09 pm

    Hi Mark,

    Anyone whose life is devoted to music must be dedicated; there is no other choice. But there is something about those that play in the lineage of Tristano that goes even beyond dedication and I think Connie Crothers must have been a perfect example of that. I have cds of hers of course, but hearing her live two years ago, with you and the quartet, will stay with me forever. I wish I had known her.

    I can only imagine how you must feel and you have my sincerest sympathy.
    David Sherr

  6. This is a beautiful page of memories. I am so very sorry to hear about Connie, I know how much she meant to you and to a rarified and exquisite world of music. Please accept my love and deepest condolences. For The Ages is one of my new favorites.. ‘….the echo of a train in eternity…’ yes.

  7. yeah, Gerry Mulligan…been listening to a Monk & Mulligan album from 1957…they are good together for sure, would like to see The Subterraneans movie Mulligan was in…Annie Menebroker was one of the best, she never let us down with her unique vision and beautiful words, thanks for the fine photo of her

  8. thanks for photo of Annie at her typer… have been mourning her deeply since July 9, day of her death…my friend, confidante, fellow poet lady, loyal epistolary pal since 1974… god, I miss her, her daily encouraging words via email, now dream about her… another dream just this morning as I overslept from pain of a new ailment…love and respect again to you, dear wise Mark for all these fabulous photos and your recollections of some of the most talented musicians and artists who ever lived… how lucky that you met them in person…captured their souls on film for eternity…

  9. *This was the show that I had intended to air last Thursday (altho, with the news of Connie’s passing I added a couple tracks of her music ———- I’ll be airing a Connie Crothers feature very soon on the Thursday Jazz Show) providing Hillary & NPR do not conspire to pre-empt me again with their ridiculous idea of what a Presidential hopeful should sound like . . . . .

    ———————————playlist————————————–
    August 18, 2o16
    The Tasty Pudding Jazz Radio Show
    Host MARK WEBER
    KUNM Albuquerque

    1. Stan Getz AT THE SHRINE “Tasty Pudding” –8nov54 —— on a Norman Granz package tour with Ellington Orch, Brubeck Qrt, and Gerry Mulligan Quintet ———– Getz w/Bob Brookmeyer and John Williams(p) —- this rendition really shows Getz’s genius —– I’m not overly fond of Al Cohn’s (he wrote Tasty Pudding) B section, it’s a little too fruity-dooty and a giant left-turn from the moody noir A section —–SO, Stan only picks out a few notes from the B section that keep the mood of the A section still in the air, a genius move

    2. Kenny Clarke All Stars — “Telefunken Blues” —Frank Wess (flute & tenor); Milt Jackson (piano); Henry Coker (trombone); Eddie Jones (b); Kenny (d), Ernie Wilkins (arr); Charlie Fowlkes (bari) — a sextet — 7feb55

    3. Connie Crothers – Lenny Popkin Quartet w/Carol Tristano & Rich Califano — “East 9th Street Drift” –1996 cd SESSION (New Artists Records) —- I don’t think Connie wrote very much in the blues form, but here’s one from this band that I sure wish I had caught live (altho, she certainly played the blues form quite often in spontaneous settings) . . . . . I sure hope they dig out some old concert recordings and release more (!)

    4. Art Pepper & Warne Marsh w/rhythm section “Tickle Toe” — blazing — 26nov56 — from the 1972 Lp THE WAY IT WAS! (Contemporary) —– I was on the set by the time they finally released this material and we all went gaagaa, one of my favorite records of all time . . . . . You can imagine my flabbergasted surprised that Wednesday evening I pulled up in front of Donte’s in North Hollywood (January 26, 1977) and the marquee said: Art Pepper & Warne Marsh (why didn’t I take a picture?) (the TIMES had it listed as Warne with Pete Christlieb) So, I scrambled around in my Volks and dug up a cassette I could use to make a stealth recording (not too surprising, in later years, I found out I wasn’t the only one with a cassette recorder in my bag on this magical night in California)

    5. Miles Davis “Tasty Pudding” — this is the first recorded version of Al Cohn’s song — 19feb53 — septet — first released as a 10-inch album called MILES PLAYS THE COMPOSITIONS OF AL COHN, soon after re-issued on 12-inch as MILES WITH HORNS, and now found in the Miles Complete Prestige Box — this is a smoking version, hard-charging, but that B section throws me off the boat . . . . . . Tom Lord Discography lists only seven extant recordings of this great tune

    6. Bud Shank Quartet (guitarist Billy Bean sits out on this track) “Blues in the Surf” –18apr59 — soundtrack to SLIPPERY WHEN WET (World Pacific/Fresh Sound) — There’s a marvelous photo of this quartet from this period (w/ Dennis Budimer, guitar) working their regular gig at the Drift Inn, Malibu, found in James A. Harrod’s book JAZZ: WEST RECORDS —- This session always reminds me of the work Gary Peacock did with Albert Ayler in the summer of 1964 in the exact same blowing configuration of trio w/ drums, that resulted in the masterpiece SPIRITUAL UNITY (ESP)(in my estimation the apex of Ayler’s recorded legacy) —– Gary Peacock switched coasts in 1963 and never came back to L.A.

    7. Gerry Mulligan Sextet “Night Lights” –Sept.1963 — one of the great noir tunes of all time, very melancholy — from cd NIGHT LIGHTS (Verve)

    8. Sue Raney “Here’s that Rainy Day” — 1963 from album ALL BY MYSELF —— We need to have another telephone conversation with Sue, she’s always perfect on the airwaves of her old hometown Albuquerque (Sue lives in Hollywood)

    9. Lorraine Geller Trio “Clash by Night” (LG) — 1954 w/Leroy Vinnegar & Bruz Freeman —— Lorraine (1928-1958) lived a too-short life, but left some remarkable West Coast recordings behind

    10. Connie Crothers & Richard Tabnik “Intuition Blues” a spontaneous deep piece recorded one afternoon at the Chelsea Hotel where Connie was living for a year or two — 21march87 — from Lp DUO DIMENSION (New Artists 103) — I had asked RT to suggest a track for this show and he picked this one, and coincidently after the radio show I stumbled across an email stuck inside the sleeve of Lp from Connie 31may2oo3 where she says “I also like Intuition Blues with Richard on DUO DIMENSION, although that is not a blues. It is a free stretch.” ( I had been asking her about what blues she had recorded.)(Lennie Tristano Quintet 1949 recorded a free unpremeditated “Intuition” for Capitol that has had wide-spread influence and/or disbelief — the only relationship between the two is merely the nod toward its predecessor in the title.)

    11.Paul Quinichette Sextet “Rock-a-Bye-Basie” (Lester Young line) — 18oct57 from cd FOR BASIE (Prestige)

    12. Gerry Mulligan large band w/ Don Joseph(trpt) and Lee Konitz(alto) “All the things you are” –20apr57—- I heard this last week on John Trentacosta’s KSFR Santa Fe Monday morning show with guest deejay Michael Morreale (they were doing a show on their Staten Island mentor Don Joseph)(see YouTube with both John & Michael playing with Don Joseph to understand what a great player Joseph was)

    13. Chet Baker Quartet “Tasty Pudding” — 10feb56 Paris (Barclay Sessions) — another masterful rendition of this beautiful tune, played REAL slow and with all the gravitas that only Chet could bring to the table —————- I think I’m going to start the proceedings with this track next week, it is so baad, and it had to be faded out on the show for the next program . . . . . . . . . Our noon-day jazz shows are only 83 minutes, but, that’s better than nothing! (As soon as our present great Gen.Mgr retires they’ll be tossing the jazz shows out the window at KUNM, I’m fairly guessing . . . . . . .)

  10. Thanks for playing ‘Intuition Blues’… that track is special to me… as was Connie (to say the least…)

  11. Dear Mark, I am touched by your poetry for Connie.
    Words escape me. But Connie’s love fills in. As Connie used to say..to be continued…

  12. ——————————–playlist——————————–
    the wasps & bumblebees jazz radio show
    August 25, 2o16
    KUNM Albuquerque

    1. Oscar Peterson Trio + Milt Jackson (Ray Brown, Ed Thigpen) “On Green Dolphin Street” –15sept61—-cd VERY TALL (Verve)
    2. Toots Thielemans “East of the Sun” — 7jan58 — cd MAN BITES HARMONICA (Riverside) w/ Pepper Adams, Wilbur Ware, Art Taylor
    3. Toots “Midnight Cowboy Theme” soundtrack — 1969
    4. Lester Young “Polka Dots and Moonbeams” –17sept49–w/ Hank Jones, Buddy Rich, Ray Brown —- COMPLETE LESTER YOUNG STUDIO SESSIONS ON VERVE
    5. Lester Young “Count Every Star” — June 1950 w/ John Lewis, Joe Shulman, Bill Clark (Verve)
    6. Connie Crothers – Lenny Popkin Quartet w/ Carol Tristano & Rich Califano “Bird’s Word” (CC) — 1996 cd SESSION (New Artists) ——This track is both hard-charging and light as a feather floating softly in a breeze
    7. Chuck Redd Quintet w/Howard Alden “On a Slow Boat to China” –May 2005– cd REMEMBERS BARNEY KESSEL: HAPPY ALL THE TIME (Arbors)
    8. Marian McPartland Trio “What is this thing called love?’ –27apr53 w/ Joe Morello
    9. Oscar Moore Quartet “There’ll Never Be Another You” — 1954 w/Carl Perkins
    10. Count Basie Orchestra “Kansas City Wrinkles” w/Marshall Royal clarinet solo (!) other solos by Snooky Young, and Henry Coker — cd LIL’ OL’ GROOVEMAKER BASIE (Verve)
    11. Reuben Wilson 4 “Willow Weep for Me” — c.2002 cd ORGAN BLUES (Jazzateria)
    12. Llew Matthews Trio “It’s Only a Paper Moon” — Oct.2006 cd WHEN YOU WISH UPON A STAR
    13. Buddy Morrow Orch “Johnny Staccato’s Theme” — 1959
    14. Al McKibbon Sextet w/ Frank Morocco (accordion); Barry Zweig (guitar); Justo Almario (flute); Joe DeLeon (perc.); Roman Banda (drumset) “U.M.M.G” (Billy Strayhorn) — 2003 cd BLACK ORCHID

  13. ———————————-playlist————————
    the miscellaneous jazz radio show
    September 1, 2o16
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Dexter Gordon “Manha de Carnaval” (Luis Bonfa) w/Bobby Hutcherson, Bob Cranshaw, Billy Higgins, Barry Harris — May 1965 cd GETTIN’ AROUND (Blue Note) — record producer Tom Albach recommended this song for the radio show “This is Barry Harris’s best solo”
    2. Milt Jackson Quintet — his first date for Blue Note under his own name — album WIZARD OF THE VIBES–7apr52 “What’s New” (Bob Haggart) in a quartet w/ John Lewis, Percy Heath, Kenny Clarke —– This is the session that garnered the very first recorded version of “Bag’s Groove” of which, according to Tom Lord
    Discography there are a subsequent 280 versions — I had pulled this record (my LP is signed by Milt: “Best of Soul” — I told the story of that autograph over the airwaves) because intended to play “Bags Groove” but
    Bob Haggart’s tune got to me.
    3. Birgitta Flick Quartet “De doda kattornas grotta” somehow that doesn’t sound German (Birgitta lives in Berlin, she’s a tenor saxophonist who studied with Connie) — January 2o12 cd YINGYING
    4. Kenny Dorham Quartet “Alone Together” –13nov59 cd QUIET KENNY (Prestige)
    5. Susan Jones Quartet “Summertime” — 2o11 cd EXIT 19 FUTURE — she’s a Washington DC-area violinist
    6. Stan Getz Quartet “Too Close for Comfort” –Nov.1956 cd THE STEAMER (Verve)
    7. Chet Baker Quartet “Tasty Pudding” Al Cohn’s tune played slowed down and the tenor player is
    so beautiful I never heard of him Jean-Louis Chautemps, got to check this guy out further — 10feb56 Paris from THE LEGENDARY BARCLAY SESSIONS
    8. Sheila Jordan w/Steve Kuhn Trio “Autumn in New York” cd LITTLE SONG w/ Tom Harrell on flugel — June 2002 ———– I played this song to remind myself to get to NY this Fall
    9. Lester Young w/KC6 “I Got Rhythm” –28mar44 (Mosaic) box CLASSIC 1936-1947 COUNT BASIE AND LESTER YOUNG STUDIO SESSIONS —– I love how Prez just hits a note and just keeps hitting it
    10. Connie Crothers – Lenny Popkin Quartet w/ Carol Tristano & Cameron Brown — 25nov89 in Brussels (recorded at a radio station Live over the air) cd IN MOTION (New Artists) — I played the title track
    11. Excerpt from conversation with Connie Crothers — May 4, 2008 in my wife’s sister’s 10th floor apartment on 113th Street over-looking Broadway — we had just went shopping at the farmer’s market down there on Broadway right in front of WKCR, as a matter of fact, and then sat around the table and had this conversation —— I aired this as a prelude to next week’s radio show when I do a tribute to Connie and
    play excerpts from some of our other recorded conversations
    12. Connie Crothers – Lenny Popkin Quartet “Dancing Red” from IN MOTION
    13. Michael Anthony & First Take Trio (Cal Haines, drums; Michael Glynn, bass) “Recollections of H.R.” –8sept2o13 a great tune Michael wrote for his mentor and friend Howard Roberts the L.A. studio cat (he’s the guy who plays all that interesting guitar stuff on The Beverly Hillbillies)
    14. Myra Melford Quintet, an elegy “Night of Sorrow” from cd SNOWY EGRET — Dec.2013

  14. Thanks Mark and I do hope you get to New York this fall. I just hope I’ll be in town when you do. Your the best my dear and I send you lots of love always…..Sheila….

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