Group Mind

Handbill for concert at Claremont Colleges student union building basement in the legendary Smudge Pot with David performing that night: January 15, 1977 ---- photo by Mark Weber

Handbill for concert at Claremont Colleges student union building basement in the legendary Smudge Pot with David performing that night: January 15, 1977 —- photo by Mark Weber

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

April 27, 2o17 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

GROUP MIND

I was looking through a bookseller’s catalog the other day and had a knee-jerk reaction to a book that seemed to infer that telepathy didn’t exist —- what would you think of a book subtitled approximately: the Pseudoscience of Telepathy and Other Powers of the Mind? My first reaction was that I realized Americans do not attend jazz concerts. Maybe proving that such things as clairvoyance, telekenesis, ESP, and telepathy, are so far nearly impossible to reliably evidence, my own belief is that homo sapiens had thought transference in abundance before Word Virus invaded our brains. Remember that interesting book a few years back THE SENSE OF BEING STARED AT (2003) which I immediately read, having conducted my own casual experiments along these lines for years —- Sitting shotgun on Los Angeles freeways during slow traffic I would stare at drivers in the car next to me and I swear to God they almost always turned their head and looked directly at you, as if an unconscious response on their part. So, after reading that book I started looking at people  in crowds, usually the backs of their heads, or sideways, and only about 40% of the time would they turn and eye to eye stare deep into your mind, it was eerie. 40% is a lot. I wonder’d if younger brains were better at detecting another brain looking at them? I’m still “researching” that one. Jazz musicians demonstrate the ancient human capacity for thought transference every single night on stage all over the world. I like to call it telepathy. As to the verifiable existence of knee-jerk reactions I think it has been proven that one should abstain from such things, and quit calling them “intuition.” The author in question was Brian Clegg, a physicist with a perfectly irreproachable reputation in science writing on subjects such as quantum entanglement, time machines, Big Bang, infinity (a brief history of . . . .), Are numbers real? the random universe, God, gravity, the prehistory of the universe —- All those things you used to think about when you were a kid laying in the grass staring at the stars at night.

David Murray Trio at Century City Playhouse, Los Angeles -- January 6, 1977 ---- David in town from NYC -- trio was local cat Roberto Miranda (bass) and maybe he brought Oliver Johnson with? on drums -- Sitting in: John Carter (clarinet, with his back to camera) and James Newton (flute) ---- photo by Mark Weber

David Murray Trio at Century City Playhouse, Los Angeles — January 6, 1977 —- David in town from NYC — trio was local cat Roberto Miranda (bass) and maybe he brought Oliver Johnson with? on drums — Sitting in: John Carter (clarinet, with his back to camera) and James Newton (flute) —- photo by Mark Weber

World Saxophone Quartet -- November 14, 1986 -- Harkness Chapel, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio -- photo by Mark Weber -- Julius Hemphill, Oliver Lake, Hamiet Bluiett, David Murray ---- a complex band in the extreme

World Saxophone Quartet — November 14, 1986 — Harkness Chapel, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio — photo by Mark Weber — Julius Hemphill, Oliver Lake, Hamiet Bluiett, David Murray —- a complex band in the extreme

Not sure why James Newton isn't mentioned on the handbill for this January 15, 1977 concert -- That's James and David Murray, who both had associations with Claremont Colleges -- NOTE that the album SOLOMON'S SONS (Circle Records) has the incorrect date of January 16 -- I'm fairly certain they didn't play 2 nights, although that's not outside the realm of possibilities, these guys were hungry to play these years, but January 16 would have been a Sunday night and this is a sleepy college town ---- You can see Bruce Bidlack's recording mikes in this shot ---- photo by Mark Weber

Not sure why James Newton isn’t mentioned on the handbill for this January 15, 1977 concert — That’s James and David Murray, who both had associations with Claremont Colleges — NOTE that the album SOLOMON’S SONS (Circle Records) has the incorrect date of January 16 — I’m fairly certain they didn’t play 2 nights, although that’s not outside the realm of possibilities, these guys were hungry to play these years, but January 16 would have been a Sunday night and this is a sleepy college town —- You can see Bruce Bidlack’s recording mikes in this shot —- photo by Mark Weber

David Murray getting his horns adjusted at Second Wind Repair by Janet Harman, who is a bass player around town and a member of the popular ever-working Albuquerque Cuban-style jazz band Son Como Son -- How a bass player became a master woodwinds repair tech has long been a ponderance of mine ---- photo by Mark Weber -- April 10, 2o17 Albuquerque -- You can see David's bass clarinet behind Janet, and that's his Mark VI in his lap

David Murray getting his horns adjusted at Second Wind Repair by Janet Harman, who is a bass player around town and a member of the popular ever-working Albuquerque Cuban-style jazz band Son Como Son — How a bass player became a master woodwinds repair tech has long been a ponderance of mine —- photo by Mark Weber — April 10, 2o17 Albuquerque — You can see David’s bass clarinet behind Janet, and that’s his Mark VI in his lap

David Murray at Outpost Performance Space -- April 9, 2o17 ---- photo by Steve Schmidt ---- It was at this concert that David told me he saw the blast from the past Larry Seidler at his gig the night before in Vallejo, California ----- So, he gave me Larry's number and I called a few days later and Larry said, "David sounds incredible, better than ever! I have their duet cd that was recorded a couple years ago and they're way beyond that now, just incredible."

David Murray at Outpost Performance Space — April 9, 2o17 —- photo by Steve Schmidt —- It was at this concert that David told me he saw the blast from the past Larry Seidler at his gig the night before in Vallejo, California —– So, he gave me Larry’s number and I called a few days later and Larry said, “David sounds incredible, better than ever! I have their duet cd that was recorded a couple years ago and they’re way beyond that now, just incredible.”

David Murray & MW at Studio 725 -- April 10, 2o17 Albuquerque -- photo by my neighbor Neil ---- David and I have known each other since the Claremont days when we were 19 ---- now we're 63

David Murray & MW at Studio 725 — April 10, 2o17 Albuquerque — photo by my neighbor Neil —- David and I have known each other since the Claremont days when we were 19 —- now we’re 63

Art Pepper at Donte's -- January 1979 -- photo by Mark Weber ---- At the same time I was experiencing the emergence of David Murray in Claremont and all that free jazz with Larry, I was hitting the North Hollywood jazz clubs and caught Pepper ten dozen times, he was so electric ---- I saw similarities between he and David Murray's approach, maybe because they both always went for it total burn down the barn ---- Pepper those years never laid back, everything was do or die

Art Pepper at Donte’s — January 1979 — photo by Mark Weber —- At the same time I was experiencing the emergence of David Murray in Claremont and all that free jazz with Larry, I was hitting the North Hollywood jazz clubs and caught Pepper ten dozen times, he was so electric —- I saw similarities between he and David Murray’s approach, maybe because they both always went for it total burn down the barn —- Pepper those years never laid back, everything was do or die

Larry Seidler who I haven't seen in ages ---- This shot is at my little alley house in Upland, California -- 1977 ---- I first met Larry five years before in 1973 where a bunch of us bohos lived at the base of Mt Baldy in a clutch of cabins called Sunshine Apartments (24th & Euclid, Upland CA) ---- I heard this weird music coming out of his cabin ---- I stood there in amazement and he saw me confused in shock and invited me in and that's where I saw my first ESP records -- He was playing Albert Ayler or maybe it was Paul Bley he loved all that stuff ---- Larry was a student at Claremont Colleges ----- Although, I might have heard Albert Ayler by then, because when he saw that I already had Bobby Bradford & John Carter albums in my own collection (back then one generally heard Albert Ayler before hearing Bradford) and I do remember specifically that I was flabbergasted when Larry told me that Bobby Bradford was playing a gig at Claremont Colleges in the next couple weeks (I hadn't a clue that Bradford was actively playing or lived that close -- This was before Bobby's long 1973 sojourn to London) ---- Larry was a good guy ---- I don't think I was familiar with the characteristic known as mensch, but Larry had that in abundance ------------------You'd think I remember'd better, what I do remember was arriving in San Francisco after an 8-hour drive how audacious Larry was as he somehow got us entry without paying (money was short to be sure, alas) simply by talking a blue streak, and there we were: Inside Keystone Korners for the first time (first of many in the years to come) and what I don't exactly remember was whether Cecil was playing when we walked in? I think not, elsewise Larry would not have been able to effect his onslaught of which I was unaware of this tactic, it being spontaneous in the extreme, and me, Sharon, and David Murray just rolled with it, still feeling the road in our bones (we drove up in Larry's 1973 BMW, what a great ride), we were fairly impecunious, Larry and David being college students and me a factory worker with my young wife ---- The Cecil Taylor Trio probably hit shortly after we stepped inside and the electricity of seeing Mr Taylor for the first time (October 1974) charged the atmosphere (only about twenty in attendance, Cecil was legendary but not that sought after those years) the idea of entry fee became irrelevant as the music enveloped us, Jimmy Lyons incisive alto and Andrew Cyrille muscle ---- All I know was: these fast-talking college guys were something I'd never experienced before, let alone Cecil and his Trio, which was everything and more than expected after our long haul from Southern California ---- Lyons sax could go right through you and Cyrille's thing was to set triggers under Cecil and play the walls off the clock -- we were absolutely thunderstruck, and then with Larry's elegance afterwards somehow has offered to take Cecil to dinner and there we are, back in the BMW with Cecil riding shotgun! ------------- That same trip Larry introduced me to Henry Kuntz, the editor of BELLS magazine (we slept on Henry's floor)(David stayed at his mother's in Berkeley) ----------- Larry came from Iowa so he was used to long drives, I guess, I remember one time back in Claremont he tried to convince me to drive to Portland to catch Sam Rivers, and I demured, that was a bit of a stretch for me, but Larry went! Larry had a radio show at KSPC called Radio Free Claremont where he played free jazz with a smattering of the Chicago blues that he loved so much (1973-1974) ---- All of it comes down to: Lines of influence ---- NOTE: the Sunshine Apartments could easily be a scene from a Ross Macdonald novel, one of my all-time favorite authors

Larry Seidler who I haven’t seen in ages —- This shot is at my little alley house in Upland, California — 1977 —- I first met Larry five years before in 1973 where a bunch of us bohos lived at the base of Mt Baldy in a clutch of cabins called Sunshine Apartments (24th & Euclid, Upland CA) —- I heard this weird music coming out of his cabin —- I stood there in amazement and he saw me confused in shock and invited me in and that’s where I saw my first ESP records — He was playing Albert Ayler or maybe it was Paul Bley he loved all that stuff —- Larry was a student at Claremont Colleges —– Although, I might have heard Albert Ayler by then, because when he saw that I already had Bobby Bradford & John Carter albums in my own collection (back then one generally heard Albert Ayler before hearing Bradford) and I do remember specifically that I was flabbergasted when Larry told me that Bobby Bradford was playing a gig at Claremont Colleges in the next couple weeks (I hadn’t a clue that Bradford was actively playing or lived that close — This was before Bobby’s long 1973 sojourn to London) —- Larry was a good guy —- I don’t think I was familiar with the characteristic known as mensch, but Larry had that in abundance ——————

You’d think I remember’d better, what I do remember was arriving in San Francisco after an 8-hour drive how audacious Larry was as he somehow got us entry without paying (money was short to be sure, alas) simply by talking a blue streak, and there we were: Inside Keystone Korners for the first time (first of many in the years to come) and what I don’t exactly remember was whether Cecil was playing when we walked in? I think not, elsewise Larry would not have been able to effect his onslaught of which I was unaware of this tactic, it being spontaneous in the extreme, and me, Sharon, and David Murray just rolled with it, still feeling the road in our bones (we drove up in Larry’s 1973 BMW, what a great ride), we were fairly impecunious, Larry and David being college students and me a factory worker with my young wife —-

The Cecil Taylor Trio probably hit shortly after we stepped inside and the electricity of seeing Mr Taylor for the first time (October 1974) charged the atmosphere (only about twenty in attendance, Cecil was legendary but not that sought after those years) the idea of entry fee became irrelevant as the music enveloped us, Jimmy Lyons incisive alto and Andrew Cyrille muscle —- All I know was: these fast-talking college guys were something I’d never experienced before, let alone Cecil and his Trio, which was everything and more than expected after our long haul from Southern California —- Lyons sax could go right through you and Cyrille’s thing was to set triggers under Cecil and play the walls off the clock — we were absolutely thunderstruck, and then with Larry’s elegance afterwards somehow has offered to take Cecil to dinner and there we are, back in the BMW with Cecil riding shotgun! ————-

That same trip Larry introduced me to Henry Kuntz, the editor of BELLS magazine (we slept on Henry’s floor)(David stayed at his mother’s in Berkeley) ———– Larry came from Iowa so he was used to long drives, I guess, I remember one time back in Claremont he tried to convince me to drive to Portland to catch Sam Rivers, and I demured, that was a bit of a stretch for me, but Larry went! Larry had a radio show at KSPC called Radio Free Claremont where he played free jazz with a smattering of the Chicago blues that he loved so much (1973-1974) —- All of it comes down to: Lines of influence —- NOTE: the Sunshine Apartments could easily be a scene from a Ross Macdonald novel, one of my all-time favorite authors

Nii Otoo Annan & Friends concert at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque -- October 9, 2o10 ---- Jefferson Voorhees (drumset), Nii Otoo Annan (balafon), Alex Coke (bass flute), [not in the frame: Steve Feld (ashiwa bass box)] ------ photo by Mark Weber ---- today on the Thursday jazz show we'll take a spin on Anyaa Arts Quartet's new cd HARMATTAN (VoxLox Records) with much the same accompaniment as this concert recorded on their home turf in Accra, Ghana

Nii Otoo Annan & Friends concert at Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque — October 9, 2o10 —- Jefferson Voorhees (drumset), Nii Otoo Annan (balafon), Alex Coke (bass flute), [not in the frame: Steve Feld (ashiwa bass box)] —— photo by Mark Weber —- today on the Thursday jazz show we’ll take a spin on Anyaa Arts Quartet’s new cd HARMATTAN (VoxLox Records) with much the same accompaniment as this concert recorded on their home turf in Accra, Ghana

Carol Liebowitz and Bill Payne duet at soundcheck -- Outpost Performance Space -- May 5, 2o16 -- photo by Mark Weber ------------ I hope they someday release the music from this concert, we captured a good recording, meanwhile, today on the Thursday jazz show we'll spin Carol's new cd in duet with saxophonist Nick Lyons FIRST SET (LineArtRecords) Here's the blurb I wrote for it's release last September (2o16): Music that expands and fills up corridors after each opened door, like a memory of something you'll never forget, like a river that flows across the sky, like driving through a town upstate where an old guy named Johann is sitting on a porch swing at the motel and at the gas station the name patch on the attendant's shirt who's checking your oil says Ludwig, it's like part of you goes up into the air and circles, you can see the outlines of tall buildings on islands, the rotating beams of klieg lights pulsating into the night with all the music that has ever been.

Carol Liebowitz and Bill Payne duet at soundcheck — Outpost Performance Space — May 5, 2o16 — photo by Mark Weber ———— I hope they someday release the music from this concert, we captured a good recording, meanwhile, today on the Thursday jazz show we’ll spin Carol’s new cd in duet with saxophonist Nick Lyons FIRST SET (LineArtRecords) Here’s the blurb I wrote for it’s release last September (2o16): Music that expands and fills up corridors after each opened door, like a memory of something you’ll never forget, like a river that flows across the sky, like driving through a town upstate where an old guy named Johann is sitting on a porch swing at the motel and at the gas station the name patch on the attendant’s shirt who’s checking your oil says Ludwig, it’s like part of you goes up into the air and circles, you can see the outlines of tall buildings on islands, the rotating beams of klieg lights pulsating into the night with all the music that has ever been.

Left to right: Riha Maria Linde Rothberg, Janet Simon, Carol Liebowitz at Riha's studio in the mountain village of Placitas, New Mexico -- May 8, 2o16 ---- When Carol was in town for concerts we took her to see Riha's paintings (and Wayne's) ----- photo by Mark Weber ---- Riha once asked me if she could cut my hair (she said it looked dumb when it's long) so I thought about that a minute (I usually cut my own hair) and concluded that I was curious how an abstract expressionist would cut hair

Left to right: Riha Maria Linde Rothberg, Janet Simon, Carol Liebowitz at Riha’s studio in the mountain village of Placitas, New Mexico — May 8, 2o16 —- When Carol was in town for concerts we took her to see Riha’s paintings (and Wayne’s) —– photo by Mark Weber —- Riha once asked me if she could cut my hair (she said it looked dumb when it’s long) so I thought about that a minute (I usually cut my own hair) and concluded that I was curious how an abstract expressionist would cut hair

One of the greatest painters in the West: Sharon Feder in her Denver studio -- October 29, 2o16 --- I've been looking at her paintings ever since I met her sister Janet twenty years ago and was highly-energized to finally meet this artist of luminosity and radiance ---- photo by Mark Weber ---- The Tina Goodwin Gallery that handles Sharon's paintings calls them urban landscapes, or as Tina explained to me more precisely: "built environments" -- a lot of shadows falling over deserted streets near railroad tracks and grain elevators, industrial bygone years of Denver, where she was born & raised ---- Sharon is in a phase of painting presently where she partially sands off one of her older paintings that she no longer wants around (her words), then she paints over them, another scene, so that parts of the older painting shows through like a palimpsest -- pure poetry

One of the greatest painters in the West: Sharon Feder in her Denver studio — October 29, 2o16 — I’ve been looking at her paintings ever since I met her sister Janet twenty years ago and was highly-energized to finally meet this artist of luminosity and radiance —- photo by Mark Weber —- The Tina Goodwin Gallery that handles Sharon’s paintings calls them urban landscapes, or as Tina explained to me more precisely: “built environments” — a lot of shadows falling over deserted streets near railroad tracks and grain elevators, industrial bygone years of Denver, where she was born & raised —- Sharon is in a phase of painting presently where she partially sands off one of her older paintings that she no longer wants around (her words), then she paints over them, another scene, so that parts of the older painting shows through like a palimpsest — pure poetry

I love this photo -- That's me right after I climbed out of my casket, and my old friend James Newton, at Randy Weston's book launch for his autobiography at the Outpost Performance Space -- July 30, 2011 -- photo by James Gale

I love this photo — That’s me right after I climbed out of my casket, and my old friend James Newton, at Randy Weston’s book launch for his autobiography at the Outpost Performance Space — July 30, 2011 — photo by James Gale

Andy Fite's guitar pick -- He customized these himself, cutting them down and sanding them off ---------- When we were visiting with him in Stockholm last May I asked if I could have one . . . .

Andy Fite’s guitar pick — He customized these himself, cutting them down and sanding them off ———- When we were visiting with him in Stockholm last May I asked if I could have one . . . .

11 Comments

  1. That was indeed Oakland-native-turned-Parisian-expatriate Oliver Johnson playing drums on a blind date with David Murray at the Century City Playhouse. He rented Alex Cline’s set that night (Jan. 6, 1977) and you’ll recall that Alex had painted a day-glo design on the bass drum head.

    I met Oliver for the first time after the concert and ran tape at his girlfriend’s place. Of that rainy evening he said: “I was actually quite surprised at the amount of people that turned out at this small place and especially considering the adverse circumstances, the weather, that they were very warm and enthusiastic. I mean, it didn’t even feel like America, you know what I mean? ‘Cause I’m not used to playing this kind of music that much in America where those kinds of reactions are laid down on me. And I’ve always played this music. I’ve been identified with this music certainly much more than if I had played with Memphis Slim or Dexter Gordon or anybody. Most of the people who know me, know me because of this other thing, this other music.”

    Oliver was a good, natural drummer and a gentle soul. I didn’t think anyone remembered that gig but me, Mark.

  2. Hey Mark, I remember Julius Hemphill at our home in St. Louis in the 60’s – it had something to do with the MO State Arts Council and probably also Gaslight Square… Frances Poteet (mom) had a hand in both. When she got to NM she helped Tom in the early days of the Outpost.
    On the other topic, you only let me cut your hair a couple of times… but you do a decent job on your own.

  3. Riha Maria————–I always had the feeling that your mom liked me. It all started at an Outpost mail-stuffing party with a dozen of us sitting around a table and Francis was with . . . what’s that gov’t agency that hands out grant funding? (you can see how remote I am from such things) it’s a well-known entity but those places never give money to Okies (I did try once — circa 1977 — when I needed some dough to put together a jazz photo book) SO, I told your mom that I’d rather go out and paint a couple houses to get my dough than ask for it from the powers that be. She so heartily agreed. Whereas, outfits like the Outpost need a whole lot more money than what a couple paint gigs could supply. Anyway, I’ve always funded my own projects and she thought that was sensible.

    As to haircuts: you always give me the standard one-inch all around look. I did wonder what a modernist painter such as yourself would do with hair? — my friend Joan Jobe Smith was curious — well, it was quite normal, in an artsy kind of way. (You got to be careful using the word “normal” — like: normal what? Father Knows Best normal? I think not.) I started doing haircuts out of necessity. Growing up we didnt have a lot of spare cash so my dad used to mangle me and my two brothers heads. I was more into an Elvis look those years with lots of Vitalis hair oil. (Gawd, I bet my pillow as a mess.) So, I took over. It wasn’t that hard, and later when I got to beer-drinking age, I did all my friends hair, too, for a six-pack. (Which, of course they helped drink, the fuckers.) The other reason was (haircuts were $2.25 in the early 60s) that during that short stretch where I actually did go to barbers those guys always let hair get down your shirt collar and it itched all to hell, and that had to end.

    I saw a sampler at your mom & dad’s house the other day: Gene Poteet, it says — your dad, among their huge art collection. (Riha’s folks are gone now and I’ve been helping paint the house in northeast upper Albuquerque in my spare time — very relaxing.) OH, and that’s a funny picture of Riha as she must only weigh one hundred and two pounds but that smock she’s wearing makes her look larger.

  4. ————————————playlist—————————–
    the loose wig jazz radio show
    April 27, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Joe Newman Quintet “Taps Miller” –4may60 w/ Frank Wess(tenor), Tommy Flanagan(piano), Eddie Jones(bass), Oliver Jackson(drums) cd JIM AT FIVE (Swingville) as re-issued by Fresh Sound
    2. Nils Lindberg “Curbits” –10feb60 — 4 sax + rhythm section cd SAX APPEAL (Dragon)
    3. Shelly Manne “Gazelle” –6apr53– arr. by Bill Russo: 3 sax + trombone + rhythm section: Art Pepper, Bob Cooper, Jimmy Giuffre, Curtis Counce, Marty Paich, Bob Enevoldsne–cd WEST COAST SOUNDS
    4. Art Pepper Quartet “Ophelia” –9aug75 cd LIVING LEGEND (Contemporary)
    5. Joshua Breakstone trio “You must believe in spring” –Aug.2004 cd MEMOIRE
    6. Linda Lawson “Meaning of the Blues” sax obbligatos by Art Pepper; orch arr & conducted by Marty Paich –22feb60
    7. Lucky Thompson Quartet “No More” –8march63 cd HAPPY DAYS (Prestige)
    8. Anyaa Arts Quartet “Theme for the Eulipions”(Rahsaan Roland Kirk) cd HARMATTAN w/ Alex Coke(flute), Steve Feld(Ashiwa box bass), Nii Noi Nortey(string bass), Nii Otoo Anna(drumset)–Feb.2o16
    9. Andy Fite “The Well-Tempered Clavier Book 2 — #16” (Bach) — c.2016 solo over-dubbed guitar
    10. Warne Marsh & Gary Foster “Back 2-part Invention #13” 25oct69 cd NE PLUS ULTRA
    11. David Murray sets up the next track — prerecorded
    12. David Murray-Geri Allen-Terri Lynn Carrington “The David, Geri, and Terri Show” –June 2005 cd
    PERFECTION
    13. Bill Payne sets up the next track — prerecorded
    14. Bill Payne(clarinet), Eva Lindal(violin), Carol Liebowitz(piano) — “unspoken” –12june2o12
    15. Art Pepper live at Village Vanguard “Las Cuevas de Mario” w/Elvin Jones, George Mraz, George
    Cables –29july77

  5. Thanks Mark! Great writing as always. Much appreciation for playing “Unspoken” on your show. It’s one of my favorite tracks on our CD because of the mood I think it creates and it is so quiet. These days you don’t get a lot of quiet.

  6. ———————————playlist—————————-
    The Father Mulcahy Memorial Jazz Radio Show
    May 4, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Michael Vlatkovich Trio w/ Jonathan Golove(cello) & Damon Short(drums) “Pedal Sharp Four The Name” –6aug2o15 cd TRYYO FLYING BOX (pfMentum cd 112)
    2. Australian Jazz Quintet “Swinging Goatsherd Blues” — July 1958 — arranged by Teddy Charles — Lp IN FREE STYLE (Bethlehem)
    3. Judy Christopher(vcl) & Tony Cesarano(guitar & arrangement) “It’s You or No One” –Oct.2005 demo *William Christopher, who played Father Mulcahy on TV series M.A.S.H., was Judy’s brother-in-law who passed away last December R.I.P. we loved his character and that great show . . . . .
    4. Terry Gibbs Quartet “Blue Wednesday” — 1961 Live at Shelly’s Mannehole — Lp THAT SWING THING (Verve)
    5. Eddie Duran Quartet “My Inspiration” w/ Howard Dudune incredible clarinet — Eddie Duran legendary
    Bay Area guitarist, both he and Howard Dudune (1930-24sept2o16) are/were lifelong San Franciscans — This cd (Fresh Sound) re-issue of 1955 sessions MODERN MUSIC FROM SAN FRANCISCO———–They were both cohorts of Brew Moore, Fatha Hines, Vince Guaraldi, and the Frisco scene . . . . .
    6. Cal Tjader & Stan Getz & Eddie Duran “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face” –1958 (Fantasy)
    7. Jimmy Cleveland Octet “A Hundred Years From Today” –17dec58 Lp A MAP OF JIMMY CLEVELAND (Mercury)
    8. Kenny Burrell trio “Ain’t Misbehavin'” — Sept.1978 cd WHEN LIGHTS ARE LOW (Concord)
    9. Joy Bryan w/ Marty Paich Septet “I Could Write a Book” cd JOY BRYAN SINGS (Mode VSOP)–Hollywood, June 1957 *That’s a song you used to hear quite often in the Albuquerque clubs few years back
    10. Joe Newman Quintet “Don’t Worry ’bout Me” –4may60 from COMPLETE SWINGVILLE SESSIONS (Fresh Sound) re-issue of JIVE AT FIVE w/ Frank Wess(tenor), Tommy Flanagan(piano) and two killers on
    bass & drums: Eddie Jones & Oliver Jackson —- Joe on trumpet
    11. J.J. Johnson 11 “My Little Suede Shoes” —-7dec64 cd J.J.! (Mosaic)
    12. Doug Raney trio “Purple Eyes”(Dexter Gordon composition) –1997 cd THE BACKBEAT (Steeplechase) Doug got away from us a year ago, age 59, died May 1, 2o16
    13. Sal Salvador Quintet “Five Brothers”(Gerry Mulligan)—-Nov. 1984 cd A TRIBUTE TO GERRY MULLIGAN (Stash)
    14. Jack Sheldon & His California Cool Quartet “Persuance”(John Coltrane — the 3rd movement from A Love
    Supreme) — 2007 cd IT’S WHAT I DO (Butterfly Records)

  7. ——————————-playlist—————————————–
    The Dave Pell Memorial Jazz Radio Show
    Thursday May 10, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Prez Conference “Lester Leaps In” — 1978 — the band of 4 saxes + rhythm section of Dave Pell’s in Los Angeles made 2 albums (which have been condensed incompletely onto one CD) — arrangements by Bill Holman —-Rest in Peace Dave Pell (1925-2017) got away from us last Sunday (May 7) — Dave was born and raised in NYC and as a teenager he helped fill the ranks of the big bands while the older guys were away at War playing in the bands of Tony Pastor, Bobby Sherwood, Bob Crosby — traveled to L.A. with the Pastor band in 1945 and left the band to stay behind on the Coast where he remained his entire life, notably joining the crack band Les Brown in 1947 and staying for years . . . Dave seemed to like octets, most of his own sessions were octets, and he used a variety of great Los Angeles arrangers . . . . I last visited with Dave at Med Flory’s Memorial Service at Local 47 a few years back . . . .
    2. Dave Pell Octet “Memphis in June”(Hoagy) –21apr55 w/ Tony Rizzi(g), Don Fagerquist (trpt), Bob Gordon (bari), Donn Trenner (p), Ray Sims (trombone), Dave (tenor), Buddy Clark (b), Bill Richmond (d)– arranged by Marty Paich
    3. as previous “New Orleans”(Hoagy) — arranged by Jack Montrose
    4. Dave Pell Big Small Band “Boplicity” –19mar59—- Dave on baritone sax w/ Jack Sheldon (trpt), Art Pepper (alto), Bob Enevoldsen (trombone), Marty Paich (p), Buddy Clark (b), Mel Lewis (d), Philip Stephens (tuba)—- taking a run at the tune from Birth of the Cool sessions of ten years previous . . . .
    5. Prez Conference “I Never Knew” ibid. w/ Bob Cooper, Bob Hardaway, Bob Efford, & Dave on saxes — trumpet obbligatos by Harry Sweets Edison
    6. Joanne Grauer Trio (I play this swinging track often) “Mood For Mode” — July 1957 Joanne’s first album, recorded for Mode Records, with Buddy Clark (b) and Mel Lewis (d), Joanne (p)
    7. Paul Gonsalves “Low Gravy” –20dec60– cd GETTIN’ TOGETHER (Jazzland) in quintet w/ Nat Adderley (cornet), Wynton Kelly (p), Sam Jones (b), Jimmy Cobb (d), Paul on tenor
    8. Paul Gonsalves-Harold Ashby Quintet “Swallowin’ the Blues” –1may63 — 2 tenors + rhythm section and Paul switches to guitar for a solo (his first instrument as a kid was guitar — this is probably the only track he ever recorded on guitar) Re-issued on the album GREAT ELLINGTONIANS
    9. Paul Gonsalves 6 “Cleo’s Blues” –21may63 cd TELL IT THE WAY IT IS (Impulse)
    10. Johnny Pisano & Billy Bean (two guitars) “Cirrus” –30jan58 w/ Paul Horn (flute) reissued on MAKIN’ IT & TAKE YOUR PCK (Fresh Sound)
    11. Bengt Hallberg & His Swedish All Stars “Pink Lady” — 9nov53 w/ Ake Persson (trombone), Lars Gullin (baritone), Arne Domnerus (alto), Bengt (piano & arrangement)
    12. Charles McPherson (alto) & Jay McShann w/ Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra “Hootie Blues” (Bird) –8aug91 NYC — McPherson to perform this coming July 29 for the New Mexico Jazz Workshop at the Albuquerque Museum Amphitheater, in quartet.
    13. Johnny Guarnieri solo “Viper’s Drag” (Fats Waller) –26feb78 cd FATSCINATIN’ (Star Line)
    14. Art Blakey Messengers soundtrack work “Merlin” — Dec.1958 Paris, France
    15. as previous “Blues pour Marcel” w/ Benny Golson (tenor)

  8. ———————————playlist————————————-
    the drums & bass jazz radio show
    KUNM — Albuquerque
    May 18, 2o17
    Host MARK WEBER

    Guests: Colin Deuble (double bass) & Cal Haines (drums)
    1. Henry Threadgill Zooid “This Brings Us To” title track of Nov. 2008 cd
    I love this Zooid music, it floats in space, easily, and has a quality of never resolving
    which is okay
    2. Cal & Colin live in-studio “Autumn Leaves” (if you listen to the KUNM archive please note that the first phrase is missing as I’m still getting used to this new board and on guest mikes you have to engage the button for it to be on, whereas on host mike all you have to do is engage the slider and it comes on automatically)
    3. Cal & Colin “Beatrice”(Sam Rivers immortal tune)
    4. John Coltrane Quartet “What’s New” — 18sept62 first session for Impulse
    5. Cal & Colin “Alone Together”
    6. Lenny Popkin-Connie Crothers Quartet w/Cameron Brown(bass) & Carol Tristano(drums) “L.T.” — 1988 cd LOVE ENERGY (New Artists Records)
    7. Cal & Colin “Sunny Side of the Street”
    8. Gil Evans & Ten “Ella Speed”(Hudie Ledbetter aka Leadbelly) –27sept57
    9. Coltrane Quartet “Blue Train” –15sept57 album BLUE TRAIN
    10. Cal & Colin “All the Things”
    11. Dan Dowling Quartet title track from THE TRAILING EDGE — 2o12 cd
    12. Bill Perkins-Richie Kamuca Quintet “Indian Summer” — 1956 Los Angeles

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  9. cell phone photo by Cal Haines during the show — KUNM Control Room

  10. Mark Weber

    May 26, 2017 at 4:30 am

    the tea for two jazz radio show

    ———————————————–playlist—————————
    May 25, 2o17
    KUNM Albuquerque USA
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Herbie Mann Sextet “Let Me Tell You” — 1957 — cd SULTRY SERENADE (Riverside) — This is that great band Herbie had during this time w/ Joe Puma(guitar) and Oscar Pettiford(bass) that made several records —
    this one included Jack Nimitz(baritone) and Urbie Green(trombone)
    2. Lee Konitz soloist w/ Ohad Talmor Big Band “Dante” — March 2006 — I love Lee’s quirky carefree rendering of the melody of I Got Rhythm in the opening, a master at work — cd PORTOLOGY
    3. Kenny Dorham Quartet “Lotus Blossom” album QUIET KENNY (PRestige) w/ Tommy Flanagan, Paul Chambers, Art Taylor — 13nov59
    4. Jack Montrose Quintet w/ Bob Gordon (baritone), Red Mitchell(bass), Shelly Manne(drums), & Paul Moer(piano), Jack(tenor & arrangements) — May 1955 on the West Coast cd BY JACK MONTROSE (Atlantic)
    * I pointed out that my 4 all-time favorite baritone sax players are Lars Gullin, Jack Nimitz, Arlen Asher, Bob Gordon
    5. Gil Evans Orchestra “Ballad of the Sad Young Men”(Fran Landesman) –5feb59 album GREAT JAZZ STANDARDS (Pacific Jazz) w/ Steve Lacy(soprano), Jimmy Cleveland(trombone), and Ray Crawford(guitar)
    6. Ray Crawford Quartet “It Ain’t Necessarily So” — 1977 Lp ONE STEP AT A TIME (Dobre)
    7. Chris Connor “Spring can really hang you up the most” another song by Fran Landesman (21oct1927 – 23july2o11) was a NYC beatnik type who Jack Kerouac romanced with bongoes, who wrote these bittersweet existential driftless angst songs —- this version with Maynard Ferguson’s band in 1960
    8. Brew Moore “Tea for Two” — 1956 album THE BREW MOORE QUINTET (Fantasy)
    9. Bob Belden large band “Genesis” — 2000 cd BLACK DAHLIA (Blue Note) a tone poem evocation of noir Los Angeles in the late 1940s early 50s
    10. Phil Wilson – Vic Dickenson Sextet — 2 trombones + rhythm section — 1980 Lp BOSTON–NEW YORK AXIS (Famous Door) produced by Harry Lim, one of the great producers of essential records
    11. Esa Pethman “Mr Peter” — 1964 cd THE MODERN SOUND OF FINLAND (RCA)
    12. The Gerry Mulligan Songbook “Crazy Day” a jaunty number w/ 5 saxes + rhythm section — Lee Konitz, Al Cohn, Zoot, Allen Eager, Gerry ———-one of the great great jazz albums of all time, arrangements by Bill Holman
    13. Pat Martino Quartet “Dearborn Walk” — 1970 cd DESPERADO (Prestige)
    14. as previous “Desperado” the entire album with Pat on 12-string

  11. Carol Tristano

    May 30, 2017 at 9:14 am

    Hey Mark just listened to your show with Cal and Colin live in the studio. They are a wonderful, swingin’ duo! Cal is expressing something original and beautiful with his 4 part counterpoint – each limb (note) with his beautiful sound bounce! A rare occurrence in jazz today! And I dig Colin’s sound and feeling. It’s so great that you feature musicians live from time to time. Cal took a great photo of you at work – it captures a feeling.
    And thanks for playing L.T.!

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