The Freeways of L.A.

My old truck ---- You can't live in New Mexico and not have an old truck, right? I bought this beast from a drunken cowboy poet name of Kell Robertson for $500 and that's after he begged me to buy it, and I relented, and then, later after he blew all the money in bars, said I gypped him and that he wanted $600 ---- Kell was a hardcase, good poet, but too drunk to drive, he called this rattletrap Green Thunder (1962 Dodge w/ a 318 that only felt good over 60mph) ---- I'll never forget the time Tom at the Outpost asked me to drive the Swedish bass player Anders Jormin to the airport (I forget who he was in town with, might have been Bobo Stenson) circa 1995 ---- we tossed his old bass in the back and took off, wherefore, en route I find out that this bass is like 5,000 years old and worth $80,000 ---- my knees went wobbly and I brought the speed down about twenty clicks, said: Uh, Anders, you ever hear of a gig bass, you know, plywood knockaround bass? Meanwhile this expensive piece of wood is sliding around (in its case, of course) in the back, and he says, with Scandinavian slant on his English: "I prefer to have my best instrument with me when I perform," a noble consideration, if impractical ------ Photo by MW from September 23, 1997 parked directly across the street from the old Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque

My old truck —- You can’t live in New Mexico and not have an old truck, right? I bought this beast from a drunken cowboy poet name of Kell Robertson for $500 and that’s after he begged me to buy it, and I relented, and then, later after he blew all the money in bars, said I gypped him and that he wanted $600 —- Kell was a hardcase, good poet, but too drunk to drive, he called this rattletrap Green Thunder (1962 Dodge w/ a 318 that only felt good over 60mph) —- I’ll never forget the time Tom at the Outpost asked me to drive the Swedish bass player Anders Jormin to the airport (I forget who he was in town with, might have been Bobo Stenson) circa 1995 —- we tossed his old bass in the back and took off, wherefore, en route I find out that this bass is like 5,000 years old and worth $80,000 —- my knees went wobbly and I brought the speed down about twenty clicks, said: Uh, Anders, you ever hear of a gig bass, you know, plywood knockaround bass? Meanwhile this expensive piece of wood is sliding around (in its case, of course) in the back, and he says, with Scandinavian slant on his English: “I prefer to have my best instrument with me when I perform,” a noble consideration, if impractical —— Photo by MW from September 23, 1997 parked directly across the street from the old Outpost Performance Space, Albuquerque

The Thursday Jazz Radio Show

May 24, 2o18 Jazz @ Noon every Thursday (starts at 12:07 after the satellite news) Host MARK WEBER KUNM Albuquerque, USA 89.9 FM (Mountain Standard Time) also streaming on the web KUNM.org Current time zone offset: UTC*/GMT -6 hours (*Coordinated Universal Time)/Greenwich Mean Time)

THE FREEWAYS OF L.A.

I love L.A., but it’s unlivable —- It’s too crowded, the freeways need be double-decked but earthquakes make that impossible —- Huge tsunami waves tower over the coast, swarms of wasps attack shoppers at the malls, smog has made a come-back after Proot, head of the EPA, has rescinded all restrictions on factory and auto emissions, the L.A. River Aqueduct runs black and the fish at sea where it outflows die, so do the whales, the last one died yesterday and Trump had it stuffed for his trophy room at the Western White House Fortress where he had Governor Brown strung up and he took California over and is raking in the “deals” too much money to be made to let the “environmentalists” get in the way —- He’s got California under his boot, and put Rush Limbaugh in charge of things back in DC, they both live for fatness —- I visit California less often and stay only as long as needed —- I’m stopped at the border on Rt. 40, my papers are not in order, I’m missing the permit to leave and haven’t pledged obeisance to the Oaf Potentate and am sent to work camp where I make bomb detonators, then I am made court poet, cautious, (the last court poet: Corso was boiled in oil after hanging a picture of Rimbaud on the White House lawnmower), the one before him is quarantined at the uranium mines, rabid dogs roam the fences after Proot shutter’d the laboratories, I’m now the court poet and have been commanded to write poems to His greatness —- Then, I wake up gasping.

Art Pepper (1925-1982), it's really not a Freud thing why someone uses drugs -- with heroin, you are not going to want to hear this, but it makes you feel so good, down deep it smooths out all the uncertainties, and anxieties that mankind has suffer'd, for lo, 3 million years ---- and someone like Art with his talent and intelligence was thrown into an adult world much too young and expected to rise to the occasion and take his lumps and not complain ---- He was a sitting duck ---- They've discover'd a lake community in the Swiss alps of 5,000 years ago that was growing opium poppies ---- There's no getting around the emotionally arrested state that drugs mires a person within (the inability to digest criticism, the harboring of resentments, etc) ---- I've often suspected that the image of a man sitting in lotus at Mohenjo-Daro was influenced by the opium nod, that the whole concept of meditation grew out of opium those many thousand years ago (further support for this crazy theory of mine can be found in the Veda texts that predate Mohenjo-Daro Indus Culture ---- where you find the magical drink soma [Indus Culture 3300 BC] Humans like comfort) So, Art was not alone in this long tradition of soma: All the priests in the cities before Babylon made invocations to the sacred drink, this mysterious elixir, come from the Gods, relieves all pain, the smoke therewith that gives calm and restfulness -------------- This photo is after-hours at Donte's -- January 16, 1982 second of a two-night date w/ Mike Lang, the soundtrack composer on piano ----- That foggy cloud is an artifact of improper film development ---- That's Laurie sitting at the little table in front ---- Art didn't play a lot of clarinet in public in L.A., so this was after-hours for the few of us who stayed late ----- photo by Mark Weber

Art Pepper (1925-1982), it’s really not a Freud thing why someone uses drugs — with heroin, you are not going to want to hear this, but it makes you feel so good, down deep it smooths out all the uncertainties, and anxieties that mankind has suffer’d, for lo, 3 million years —- and someone like Art with his talent and intelligence was thrown into an adult world much too young and expected to rise to the occasion and take his lumps and not complain —- He was a sitting duck —- They’ve discover’d a lake community in the Swiss alps of 5,000 years ago that was growing opium poppies —- There’s no getting around the emotionally arrested state that drugs mires a person within (the inability to digest criticism, the harboring of resentments, etc) —- I’ve often suspected that the image of a man sitting in lotus at Mohenjo-Daro was influenced by the opium nod, that the whole concept of meditation grew out of opium those many thousand years ago (further support for this crazy theory of mine can be found in the Veda texts that predate Mohenjo-Daro Indus Culture —- where you find the magical drink soma [Indus Culture 3300 BC] Humans like comfort) So, Art was not alone in this long tradition of soma: All the priests in the cities before Babylon made invocations to the sacred drink, this mysterious elixir, come from the Gods, relieves all pain, the smoke therewith that gives calm and restfulness ————– This photo is after-hours at Donte’s — January 16, 1982 second of a two-night date w/ Mike Lang, the soundtrack composer on piano —– That foggy cloud is an artifact of improper film development —- That’s Laurie sitting at the little table in front —- Art didn’t play a lot of clarinet in public in L.A., so this was after-hours for the few of us who stayed late —– photo by Mark Weber

We all know Sonny Stitt, lone wolf, roamed the country using pick-up bands, played with whoever whenever, you provide the group and the money and he'll make a record for you, made hundreds of records, all of them worth hearing, drank too much, off and on the bottle, this gig he was off, we talked sitting at a little table during a break, I had my own issues with drink and was staying sober at the time, that's what I remember we talked about, drinking is insidious, a beer here, highball there, habitual drinking is not like a frat party, it's merely one or two then three maybe another for the road and another when you get home and it adds up and after a dozen years of this the body starts sputtering like a car with a drop of water in the gas ---- Red Holloway, on the other hand, didn't have the bug, his first love was Charlie Parker, which you kind of wouldn't suspect judging from all the R&B sessions he played on and soul jazz organ groups, he was a great guy, always in a good mood, he was the music director of the Parisian Room, always met you at the door with a smile and a handshake, maybe even picked out a good table for you ---- The Parisian Room was a fabulous jazz club, situated in the West Adams District (just west of downtown, just north of South Central), I understand there's a post office there now, they tore it down, now they run mail where they used to run the changes of "Night in Tunisia" ---- photo by Mark Weber -- June 13, 1980 Los Angeles: Sonny Stitt & Red Holloway(saxophones), Harvey Newmark(bass), Bruno Carr(drums), Art Hillary(piano)

We all know Sonny Stitt, lone wolf, roamed the country using pick-up bands, played with whoever whenever, you provide the group and the money and he’ll make a record for you, made hundreds of records, all of them worth hearing, drank too much, off and on the bottle, this gig he was off, we talked sitting at a little table during a break, I had my own issues with drink and was staying sober at the time, that’s what I remember we talked about, drinking is insidious, a beer here, highball there, habitual drinking is not like a frat party, it’s merely one or two then three maybe another for the road and another when you get home and it adds up and after a dozen years of this the body starts sputtering like a car with a drop of water in the gas —- Red Holloway, on the other hand, didn’t have the bug, his first love was Charlie Parker, which you kind of wouldn’t suspect judging from all the R&B sessions he played on and soul jazz organ groups, he was a great guy, always in a good mood, he was the music director of the Parisian Room, always met you at the door with a smile and a handshake, maybe even picked out a good table for you —- The Parisian Room was a fabulous jazz club, situated in the West Adams District (just west of downtown, just north of South Central), I understand there’s a post office there now, they tore it down, now they run mail where they used to run the changes of “Night in Tunisia” —- photo by Mark Weber — June 13, 1980 Los Angeles: Sonny Stitt & Red Holloway (saxophones), Harvey Newmark (bass), Bruno Carr (drums), Art Hillary (piano)

Red Callendar -- June 1, 1980 Los Angeles -- photo by Mark Weber

Red Callendar — June 1, 1980 Los Angeles — photo by Mark Weber

Adele Sebastian(flute) who was very special, here with the Pan Afrikan People's Arkestra (that's the other flutist in the Arkestra behind her: Aubrey Hart, and conductor/pianist Horace Tapscott -- July 7, 1979 Watts Towers Jazz Festival -- photo by Mark Weber

Adele Sebastian (flute) who was very special, here with the Pan Afrikan People’s Arkestra (that’s the other flutist in the Arkestra behind her: Aubrey Hart, and conductor/pianist Horace Tapscott — July 7, 1979 Watts Towers Jazz Festival — photo by Mark Weber

This is the outtake (we have already posted the more conventional photo with all of them looking straight into the camera) : Jay Migliori with his arms outstretched, Ray Pizzi in white hat with Strazz behind him hooking his thumb over his shoulder while trombonist Bill Moffett looks straight at the camera with a laugh, Don Menza in stripe shirt with Nick Ceroli behind him ---- Just another warm night in Los Angeles out back of Carmelo's jazz club in North Hollywood -- the Don Menza Big Band between sets, with Don's 1939 Cadillac -- photo by Mark Weber -- May 26, 1980

This is the outtake (we have already posted the more conventional photo with all of them looking straight into the camera) : Jay Migliori with his arms outstretched, Ray Pizzi in white hat with Strazz behind him hooking his thumb over his shoulder while trombonist Bill Moffett looks straight at the camera with a laugh, Don Menza in stripe shirt with Nick Ceroli behind him —- Just another warm night in Los Angeles out back of Carmelo’s jazz club in North Hollywood — the Don Menza Big Band between sets, with Don’s 1939 Cadillac — photo by Mark Weber — May 26, 1980

Bob Magnusson was all over the L.A. scene in those days, making a dozen albums with Art Pepper and almost that many with Bud Shank, as well as a few with Bobby Shew, Sam Most, Mundell Lowe, Sue Raney, Holly Hofmann, Pete Jolly, Bob Cooper, Joe Diorio, he's on 190 sessions listed at Tom Lord Discography starting in 1969 with Buddy Rich up to now back in his hometown San Diego working with Bill Mays and Peter Sprague ---- photo by Mark Weber -- June 10, 1979 Local 47

Bob Magnusson was all over the L.A. scene in those days, making a dozen albums with Art Pepper and almost that many with Bud Shank, as well as a few with Bobby Shew, Sam Most, Mundell Lowe, Sue Raney, Holly Hofmann, Pete Jolly, Bob Cooper, Joe Diorio, he’s on 190 sessions listed at Tom Lord Discography starting in 1969 with Buddy Rich up to now back in his hometown San Diego working with Bill Mays and Peter Sprague —- photo by Mark Weber — June 10, 1979 Local 47

The clarinetist John Carter -- April 14, 1979 Pasadena City College ---- photo by Mark Weber

The clarinetist John Carter — April 14, 1979 Pasadena City College —- photo by Mark Weber

This is the guy you hear on all those Frank Sinatra records: guitarist Al Viola settled in Los Angeles in 1946 and participated on so many great West Coast records and soundtracks we'd have to take a detour on the Thursday Jazz Show just to play AL VIOLA for a year to catch up ---- He even played on my favorite Frank Zappa album LUMPY GRAVY (1967) -- Here he is with Buddy Collette Quintet -- July 15, 1984 Watts Towers Jazz Festival -- photo by Mark Weber

This is the guy you hear on all those Frank Sinatra records: guitarist Al Viola settled in Los Angeles in 1946 and participated on so many great West Coast records and soundtracks we’d have to take a detour on the Thursday Jazz Show just to play AL VIOLA for a year to catch up —- He even played on my favorite Frank Zappa album LUMPY GRAVY (1967) — Here he is with Buddy Collette Quintet — July 15, 1984 Watts Towers Jazz Festival — photo by Mark Weber

Floyd Dixon, blues man, pianist, follower of the horses (every time I ran into Floyd he was either coming or going to the racetrack), composer of "Call Operator 210" and "Hey Bartender" and "Dallas Blues" ---- photo by Mark Weber -- June 16, 1984, Hollywood Bowl

Floyd Dixon, blues man, pianist, follower of the horses (every time I ran into Floyd he was either coming or going to the racetrack), composer of “Call Operator 210” and “Hey Bartender” and “Dallas Blues” —- photo by Mark Weber — June 16, 1984, Hollywood Bowl

The late great BUELL NEIDLINGER with his Krystall Klear & the Buells quartet at Carmelo's, North Hollywood -- March 25, 1981 w/ Jerry Peters(piano), Peter Erskine(drums), Marty(saxophones), and Buell on bass -- the last time I spoke with Buell only a few days before he got away from us, among other things he told me about auditioning for the Capt Beefheart Magic Band and Beefheart asked "Where are your banjo finger picks?" so, Buell ran out and bought some metal banjo finger picks to use on his electric bass ---- Photo by Mark Weber

The late great BUELL NEIDLINGER with his Krystall Klear & the Buells quartet at Carmelo’s, North Hollywood — March 25, 1981 w/ Jerry Peters (piano), Peter Erskine (drums), Marty (saxophones), and Buell on bass — the last time I spoke with Buell only a few days before he got away from us, among other things he told me about auditioning for the Capt Beefheart Magic Band and Beefheart asked “Where are your banjo finger picks?” so, Buell ran out and bought some metal banjo finger picks to use on his electric bass —- Photo by Mark Weber

Fostina Dixon -- March 22, 1981 Los Angeles w/ Leslie Drayton Orchestra -- photo by Mark Weber

Fostina Dixon — March 22, 1981 Los Angeles w/ Leslie Drayton Orchestra — photo by Mark Weber

The Return of Woody & Boomer -- Recording session at Studio 725 -- February 20, 2o18 -- photo by Mark Weber ----my good friends Michael Anthony(guitar) & David Parlato(bass)

The Return of Woody & Boomer — Recording session at Studio 725 — February 20, 2o18 — photo by Mark Weber —-my good friends Michael Anthony (guitar) & David Parlato (bass)

Arlen Asher Quartet -- John Bartlit(drums), John Blackburn(bass), Jim Ahrend(piano), Milton Arlen Asher(woodwinds) -- March 4, 2o18 @ St Johns United Methodist Church, Albuquerque -- photo by Mark Weber -- They played "Willow Weep for Me"(flute), "Summertime"(soprano sax), "That's a Plenty"(clarinet) and Arlen told story about his early love of Benny Goodman and BG's arrangement on "That's a Plenty," that his very first gig was in a bar at age 13 in Missouri on December 6, 1941 "the day before the attack on Pearl Harbor." "A Flower is a Lovesome Thing"(alto), "Mirage"(Jim Ahrend comp. w/Arlen on alto), "Memories of You"(clarinet), "But Beautiful"(alto flute), "I Love You"(alto), "Lost in a Memory"(JA --soprano), "Honeysuckle Rose/Scrapple from the Apple"(bass clarinet), "Lush Life"(soprano), and encore "Over the Rainbow"(alto) with vocal by Michael Herndon -----* My dream is to mount a concert with Sheila Jordan accompanied by Arlen someday (they were born 1928/1929 and both at the top of their game) and would sound fantastic together w/ Alan Broadbent and Cameron Brown (Arlen is all for it, when I told him)

Arlen Asher Quartet — John Bartlit (drums), John Blackburn (bass), Jim Ahrend (piano), Milton Arlen Asher (woodwinds) — March 4, 2o18 @ St Johns United Methodist Church, Albuquerque — photo by Mark Weber — They played “Willow Weep for Me”(flute), “Summertime”(soprano sax), “That’s a Plenty”(clarinet) and Arlen told story about his early love of Benny Goodman and BG’s arrangement on “That’s a Plenty,” that his very first gig was in a bar at age 13 in Missouri on December 6, 1941 “the day before the attack on Pearl Harbor.” “A Flower is a Lovesome Thing” (alto), “Mirage”(Jim Ahrend comp. w/Arlen on alto), “Memories of You” (clarinet), “But Beautiful” (alto flute), “I Love You” (alto), “Lost in a Memory” (JA –soprano), “Honeysuckle Rose/Scrapple from the Apple” (bass clarinet), “Lush Life” (soprano), and encore “Over the Rainbow” (alto) with vocal by Michael Herndon —–* My dream is to mount a concert with Sheila Jordan accompanied by Arlen someday (they were born 1928/1929 and both at the top of their game) and would sound fantastic together w/ Alan Broadbent and Cameron Brown (Arlen is all for it, when I told him)

Collection of Mark Weber

Collection of Mark Weber

12 Comments

  1. After Elvin Jones’ last set in the parking lot of the Parisian Room I ran into Buddy Collette. We were working in the pit for Sugar Babies at the Pantages Theater around then. Buddy was furious. He found his new Cadillac was missing all the hub caps.

  2. Mark, a great set of photos here and scintillating prose to go
    with it and the real feel of jazz and the men who make it even
    the opium gods sending inspiration to the artists…

  3. Mark — great photos here and scintillating prose to
    go with them the real feel of the men who make the
    jazz and blues even the opium gods sending down
    inspiration for artistic greatness

  4. More please.

  5. The reference to poet Corso, is to Gregory Corso’s great masterpiece poem “Marriage” from his collection THE HAPPY BIRTHDAY OF DEATH (New Directions, 1960) where he says: “Like hanging a picture of Rimbaud on the lawnmower” ————- one of the most hilarious poems in existence

  6. Baritone saxophonist Fostina Dixon was a good presence in 1980s SoCal jazz, Mark. She played in bands like Maiden Voyage, the Leslie Drayton Orchestra, and she led her own outfits. (I met her at KPFK when Breckow had her play and converse live on his show late one night, and was impressed with her professionalism.)

    The Drayton band was another local jazz asset. It had the leader’s swinging arrangements and lots of hot players–both veterans and new faces. An ongoing highlight was when alto saxophonist Curtis Peagler (late of the Basie band) was turned loose on a slow blues titled “A Greasy Brown Paper Sack.” Drayton often worked at hotel ballrooms on Sunday afternoons and a lot of his audience came directly from church. It was a tutorial to watch older black couples get up from their tables and dance to Peagler’s slow, nasty blues.

  7. Ah, Mark. In some fine, great book where the words “encyclopedic” and “knowledge” and “Jazz” come together, there is you.

  8. Mark Weber

    May 25, 2018 at 1:45 pm

    ——————————–playlist———————
    the back-engineer’d jazz radio show
    May 24, 2o18
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER
    1. Al Viola solo guitar “Only the Lonely” — 13aug79 cd MELLO’ AS A CELLO
    2. Abbey Lincoln “Hi Fly” w/ Clark Terry(trumpet), Jackie McLean(alto) — 1990 cd THE WORLD IS FALLING DOWN *played this to promote local tribute concert with singers for Abbey
    3. Art Farmer – Gigi Gryce Quintet “Stupendous-Lee” (I would think that Gigi wrote this as a salute and nod to Lee Konitz) — 26may55 w/ Horace Silver(piano), Percy Heath(bass), Kenny Clarke(drums), Gigi Gryce(alto), Art Farmer(trumpet) cd WHEN FARMER MET GRYCE (Prestige)
    4. Woody & Boomer (Michael Anthony & David Parlato) guitar & bass duet “Birk’s Works” –20feb2o18 Studio 725
    5. Al Viola Trio “You and the night and the music” –12aug79 L.A. w/ Frank DeLaRosa(bass), Frank Severino(drums), Al Viola(guitar) cd MELLO’ AS A CELLO
    6. Al Viola multiple over-dubs one man band “Angel Eyes” cd GUITARS — 1959
    7. Al Viola Trio “Nancy” — 12aug79
    8. Frank Zappa “Gum Joy” w/ guitars by Al Viola, Dennis Budimir, Tommy Tedesco –14march67 from the first recording of LUMPY GRAVY at Capitol — finally released in 2008
    9. Pete Rugolo TEN TRUMPETS AND TWO GUITARS — 1961 — “Two Guitars” (no saxes on this) w/ Howard Roberts & Al Viola, guitars; Shelly Manne(drums), Joe Mondragon(bass), Larry Bunker(vibes)
    10. Kay Starr “Limehouse Blues” — 1975 w/ Al Viola(guitar), Georgie Auld(tenor), Red Norvo(vibes), Jimmy Rowles(piano), Monty Budwig(bass), Stix Hooper(drums) Los Angeles
    11. Richard Simon 4 “Bass on Top”(Buddy Collette) w/ Al Viola(guitar), Richard Simon(bass), Johnny Kirkwood(drums), Art Hillary(piano) –May 1995 cd GROOVE THERAPY **In Richard’s bass solo — @ 4:10 in the track — he quotes the Leave It To Beaver TV Theme (1957-1963) which gave me a smile, as I used to watch that series — the theme also lays well on top of “Rhythm-A-Ning” so, probably it and Buddy’s tune are rhythm changes?
    12. Red Callendar Octet “Greenery” w/ William Green(alto solo), Buddy Collette(tenor), Bill Douglass(drums), Red(bass) –30nov55 L.A.
    13. Bob Magnusson Quartet w/ Bobby Shew(trumpet), Peter Sprague(guitar), Bob Magnusson(bass & composition), Billy Mintz(drums) — 21march84 cd SONG FOR JANET LEE (Discovery)
    14. Buell Neidlinger solo cello “Suite #1” (Bach) — 2012 cd CELLO CAFE
    15. Marty Krystall Trio “Blues for Buell” –2016 w/ Marty(tenor), Fritz Wise(drums), Mike Alvidrez(bass) cd MARTY’S MODE (K2B2 Records)
    16. Art Pepper & Lee Konitz finding all the dark places in: “The Shadow of Your Smile”(J. Mandell) w/ Mike Lang(piano), Bob Magnusson(bass), John Dentz(drums), Lee(alto), Art(clarinet) — 19jan82 L.A. cd ART STANDARDS

  9. ——————————-playlist———————————-
    May 31, 2o18
    KUNM Albuquerque
    out of nowhere jazz radio show
    Host MARK WEBER

    1. Lee Morgan 6 “The Procrastinator” w/ Wayne Shorter, Bobby Hutcherson, Billy Higgins, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter — 14july67 cd THE PROCRASTINATOR (Blue Note) *Earlier this week we watched the documentary I CALLED HIM MORGAN and this tune was used in the soundtrack and caught my ear in a big way
    2. soundtrack to TV series MIKE HAMMER “Bad Guys” –21sept59 w/ Skip Martin and hotshot L.A. session
    cats of those days — Frank Rosolino, Bob Cooper, Irv Cottler, Red Mitchell, Larry Bunker, Ted Nash, Barney Kessel, Jimmy Rowles, on & on —— this track featured 2 flutes: Paul Horn and Bud Shank, and a trumpet solo by either Conrad Gozzo or Don Fagerquist or Pete Candoli (cd Fresh Sound Records re-issue)
    3. Art Blakey Jazz Messengers “Dat Dere” wow there is footage of the Messengers playing this great tune of Bobby Timmons’ in concert and I had forgotten what a great arrangement they had on it —- Wayne Shorter, Lee Morgan, Jymie Merritt, Bobby Timmons, Blakey —-6march60 cd THE BIG BEAT (Blue Note) * 129 recorded versions of this song listed at Tom Lord Discography — the first in January 1960 by Bobby Timmons Trio; the 2nd by Cannonball in February; the 3rd in March by the Messengers, and the 4th by Oscar Brown Jr in June w/lyrics —- others are Jimmy Heath Big Band, Mel Torme, Mary Lou Williams(1975), Sheila Jordan on her first album and subsequently several times; Tubby Hayes for London television with him on vibes . . . . . . . .
    4. soundtrack to movie — July 19, 1956 —- CRIME IN THE STREETS, music by Franz Waxman “Nostalgia” — accordion unlisted but maybe? Ray Turner? who’s listed with Andre Previn as the pianist; Dorothy Remsen(harp), Georgie Auld(tenor), Joe Mondragon(bass), Barney Kessel(guitar) et. el. (Fresh Sound)
    5. Terence Blanchard soundtrack to CLOCKERS — 1995 — “Strike Packs Up” — sad melancholy noir genius
    6. Ornette w/ Howard Shore and London Philharmonic Orchestra — title track to movie NAKED LUNCH — 1992
    7. Carol Liebowitz & Birgitta Flick, piano & tenor duet “Portrait” from work-in-progress Nov. 2017
    8. Lee Morgan “Theme to Midnight Cowboy” released (1969) as a 45rpm w/ Toots Thielemans reprising his harmonica; Duke Pearson, arrangement
    9. Bobby Timmons Trio “Dat Dere” –Jan.1960 album THIS HERE IS BOBBY TIMMONS (Riverside) w/ Jimmy Cobb(drums), Sam Jones(bass), Timmons(piano)
    10. Gary Foster (clarinet) w/ Jazz at the Movies Band “Double Indemnity” w/ Bobby Tricarico solo on tenor — 1994 cd WHITE HEAT FILM NOIR
    11. Jerry Fielding soundtrack to Clint Eastwood movie THE GAUNTLET “The Pickup” featuring Art Pepper(alto) & Jon Faddis(trumpet) w/ Shelly Manne(drums), Mike Lang(piano) & studio orchestra — Sept.1977
    12. PETE KELLY’S BLUES Lp “What can I say (After I say I’m sorry)?” — 7june55 w/ Matty Matlock Jazz Band: Dick Cathcart(trpt), Moe Schneider(trombone), Matty(clarinet), Eddie Miller(tenor), Ray Sherman(piano), George Van Eps(guitar), Jud DeNaut(bass), Nick Fatool(drums)
    13. Mike Cuozzo 5 “An Evening at Papa Joe’s”(Frank Foster) cd MIGHTY MIKE CUOZZO (Fresh Sound) — 22nov55 w/ Ronnie Ball(piano), Kenny Clarke(drums) Vinnie Burke(bass), Eddie Costa(vibes), Mike Cuozzo(tenor)
    14. soundtrack to TV series M SQUAD “A Lady Sings the Blues” — March 1959 w/ music and orchestra conducted by Stanley Wilson w/ Joe Mondragon, John T. Williams, Frank Rosolino, Don Fagerquist, Dick Nash, Red Mitchell, Milt Bernhart, et. el,, featuring a fabulous BENNY CARTER lurid cliche alto solo

    **All dates refer to the recording session

  10. ——————————————playlist————————
    That’s Why They Call It the Blues jazz radio show
    June 7, 2o18
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host MARK WEBER
    1. Jackie McLean 6 “Long Drink of the Blues” –30aug57
    from his 10th album under his own leadership A LONG DRINK OF THE
    BLUES (Prestige) w/ Gil Coggins(p), Louis Hayes(drums), Paul Chambers(bass),
    Curtis Fuller(trombone), Webster Young(trumpet), Jackie(tenor & alto)
    **Jackie had had his cabaret card revoked so he spent the mid-50s doing a
    zillion recording sessions to make ends meet ———–His first appearance on record was Miles’
    DIG! (Prestige) in 1951 w/ Sonny Rollins———- After that, the flood: records with
    George Wallington, Mingus, Gene Ammons, Hank Mobley, Kenny Burrell, Donald
    Byrd, Jimmy Smith, and the soundtrack to THE CONNECTION w/ Freddie Redd —
    and that was all up to 1960 …… he continued till 2006
    2. Lee Morgan “I’ll Never Be The Same” — April 1967 album SONIC BOOM (Blue
    Note) w/ Fathead(tenor), Cedar Walton(piano), Ron Carter(bass), Billy Higgins(drums)
    3. Mike Cuozzo Quintet “Undersided” — 1955 w/Eddie Costa(vibes), Kenny Clarke(drums), Ronnie Ball(piano), Mike Cuozzo(tenor) cd MIGHTY MIKE CUOZZO (Fresh Sound)
    4. Connie Crothers – Lenny Popkin Quartet “Ontology” cd LOVE ENERGY (New Artists) — April 1988 w/ Carol Tristano(drums), Cameron Brown)bass
    5.Tubby Hayes 4 “Soho Soul” –3oct61 visiting from London w/ George Duvivier(bass), Dave Bailey(drums), Horace Parlan(piano), Tubby(tenor) cd NEW YORK SESSIONS (Columbia)
    6. David Murray & Friends “MX” –25sept92 w/ Bobby Bradford(cornet), Ravi Coltrane(tenor), Murray(tenor), John Hicks(piano), Fred Hopkins(bass), Victor Lewis(drums) cd MX Dedicated to the Memory of Malcolm X (Red Baron)
    7. Bob Badgley 5 “Confirmation” w/ Lanny Morgan cutting loose on alto; Bob Badgley(bass), Tom Ferguson(piano), Joe Lano(guitar), Frankie Capp(drums) — cd COVERING ALL THE BASS-ES (Sea Breeze Jazz)
    TWO SONGS BY BOBBY TIMMONS:
    8. Sheila Jordan “Dat Dere” (Bobby Timmons) — 19sept1962 *Sheila’s first album PORTRAIT OF SHEILA (Blue Note) w/ Steve Swallow(bass)
    9. Bobby Timmons 4 “So Tired” — Aug.1960 w/ Blue Mitchell(trumpet), Sam Jones(bass), Art Blakey(drums), Timmons(piano) cd SOUL TIME (Riverside)

    **After my show — at the beginning of the next show — called Afternoon FreeForm with Brandon Kennedy, he’s asked me to start his show with a poem and lately has asked me to find backing music —- Today I read the
    poem “Poem Beginning With a Line by Whitman” from my collection SE SAEGEN RAD DOGOR-GERIM (June 2017) with music bed by Philip Glass “Island” cd GLASSWORKS (1982) **** We’ve been doing this for several many months now, every other Thursday

  11. Mark Weber

    June 23, 2018 at 8:58 am

    ————————–playlist———————————
    the craft jazz radio show
    [we drove past a restaurant on the way to station that advertised in the window:
    Craft Tacos]
    June 21, 2o18
    KUNM Albuquerque
    Host Mark Weber
    Studio Orchestra: The Michael Vlatkovich Onetet
    1. Michael Vlatkovich trombone interludes throughout the show
    This first one was a tone row built on “Beverly” where I park my truck
    2. Kali Z Fasteau “Whalesong” — Kali (synth) in duet w/ Kidd Jordan(tenor) — undated session — cd MAKING WAVES (Flying Note Records)
    3. Gil Evans Orchestra “Thoroughbred”(Billy Harper) — 1973 album SVENGALI w/solos: Ted Dunbar(guitar); Howard Johnson(tuba); Herb Bushler(bass)
    4. Gil Evans as previous “Eleven” tone poem — w/ trumpet solo Richard Williams
    5. Michael Vlatkovich “Beverly” reprise
    6. M. Vlatkovich “Out of the wall into the night” cd MORTALITY — 2o14
    7. CHOBRATY “Blue Fragment” M. Vlatkovich & William Roper, trombone & tuba duet — 2004
    8. Phil Woods Sax Quartet “Presto from Three Improvisations for Sax Quartet” — 2o17
    9. as previous “Ballad”
    10. Gil Evans “Sister Sadie”(Horace Silver) –1960—- OUT OF THE COOL
    11. Rich Halley 4 “Radioactive” — May 2014 w/ Clyde Reed(bass), Rich(tenor), Carson Halley(drums), Vlatkovich(trombone) cd TWELVE (Pine Cone Records)
    12. Greg Abate Quintet “This I Dig of You”(Hank Mobley) w/ Claudio Roditi(trumpet), Greg Abate(alto) cd BOB LIVES!
    13. Carla Bley track 2 cd I HATE TO SING “The International Murder” –1984
    14. Steve Adams Trio “Upper and Lower Partials” w/ Ken Filiano(bass), Steve(bass flute), Scott Amendola(drums)—-cd SURFACE TENSION (Clean Feed)

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