Event at Connie’s loft | part 3

I had decided to take this night off and just hang out in my hotel room and watch the boob tube and read old books -- I had been at the Natural History Museum to see the exhibit on Pterosaurs (on 86th Street) and had walked over to one of my favorite restaurants Viand Cafe (75th & Broadway) but they were not accommodating to single diners on a Saturday night (well, I never) I caught the subway back down to Chelsea and found a deli with the improbable name Garden of Eden and was walking with my bag of food down 23rd Street to my room when I see this guy with a more antique camera than I even use! He is leaning against the ticket booth of The Chelsea cinema. I walk straight up to his smiling face and say incredulously: "Is that a Speed Graphic?" and he nods, and I say, "Is this 1930? Am I in a time warp?" These are the cameras newspaper men and ambulance chasers and Weegee used back way back a long time ago. Big flash bulbs, leave you half blind. I wound up hanging with Louis Mendes for an hour and we had a good ol' time talking about cameras and life. His was actually a variant on the Speed Graphic called the Crown Graphic, that he'd bought back in 1958 and he had it all tricked out with a polaroid back and digital lenses, but he could still shoot it in the old way if he needed. We took each others' photo (I had my Olympus 35RC with me -- small, it fits into your coat pocket) -- 6:30pm November 15, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber -- check out Louis Mendes on the internet, or do we call it the web?

I had decided to take this night off and just hang out in my hotel room and watch the boob tube and read old books — I had been at the Natural History Museum to see the exhibit on Pterosaurs (on 86th Street) and had walked over to one of my favorite restaurants Viand Cafe (75th & Broadway) but they were not accommodating to single diners on a Saturday night (well, I never) I caught the subway back down to Chelsea and found a deli with the improbable name Garden of Eden and was walking with my bag of food down 23rd Street to my room when I see this guy with a more antique camera than I even use! He is leaning against the ticket booth of The Chelsea cinema. I walk straight up to his smiling face and say incredulously: “Is that a Speed Graphic?” and he nods, and I say, “Is this 1930? Am I in a time warp?” These are the cameras newspaper men and ambulance chasers and Weegee used back way back a long time ago. Big flash bulbs, leave you half blind. I wound up hanging with Louis Mendes for an hour and we had a good ol’ time talking about cameras and life. His was actually a variant on the Speed Graphic called the Crown Graphic, that he’d bought back in 1958 and he had it all tricked out with a polaroid back and digital lenses, but he could still shoot it in the old way if he needed. We took each others’ photo (I had my Olympus 35RC with me — small, it fits into your coat pocket) — 6:30pm November 15, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber — check out Louis Mendes on the internet, or do we call it the web?

Why do I read such old books?
Because I don’t need to know what’s in modern
………….literature anymore, I’ve already read all that.
At this stage of my life I find comfort in reading the old texts,
even as they can be disturbing in their reality, even more
than reading about dystopian present world . . . . There is
…………….something in the rhythm of the
sentences that comforts me, especially Anglo-Saxon
with their verbs before the nouns way of saying things,
……..their eloquence, and the power invested in
each word, so that you must read slower, slow
down,
and
take in
each
word like it is a world unto itself

Words have power, if you can line them up in certain ways, things
can happen

After writing the caption for photo “Roger Mancuso on the move”
I got to wondering if
motion parallax could be used in poem writing?
And then I realized that, yes, of course,
it’s just another name for what I refer to as a poem
……………………….revolving like a Calder mobile, how
it turns around and tenses change
……….and the cases of the words do not matter . . . .

What is the most immediate?
What is the most there?

Quintus Horatius Flaccus is always best to turn to
with his advice that a poem (art) should have harmony,
proportion and an appropriate rhythm — Art Poetica

Connie Crothers and George McMullen -- November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber -- It has been long years ere a trombone has ventured into these realms, sayeth the ghost of Willie Dennis

Connie Crothers and George McMullen — November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber — It has been long years ere a trombone has ventured into these realms, sayeth the ghost of Willie Dennis.

Kazzrie Jaxen & Virg Dzurinko, four-handed piano -- November 16, 2o14 -- This photo is about the same quality as the one surviving picture of Lincoln at Gettysburg, and that's because (here comes the excuses) the camera I use with flash was out of film and the light was very gray at this very end of the evening -- photo by Mark Weber with Olympus RC-35 rangefinder

Kazzrie Jaxen & Virg Dzurinko, four-handed piano — November 16, 2o14 — This photo is about the same quality as the one surviving picture of Lincoln at Gettysburg, and that’s because (here comes the excuses) the camera I use with flash was out of film and the light was very gray at this very end of the evening — photo by Mark Weber with Olympus RC-35 rangefinder

Nick Lyons and Tom Thorndike (Tom has been studying with Connie about  2 years) amazing -- free improvisation -- November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

Nick Lyons and Tom Thorndike (Tom has been studying with Connie about 2 years) amazing — free improvisation — November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

Mara Rosenbloom (another pianist studying with Connie) and Nick Lyons, post-graduate work --  November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

Mara Rosenbloom (another pianist studying with Connie) and Nick Lyons, post-graduate work — November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

Bill Chattin with Kazzrie Jaxen Quartet -- November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

Bill Chattin with Kazzrie Jaxen Quartet — November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

Don Messina, Jimmy Halperin, Kazzrie Jaxen ------ November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber -- Jimmy  didn't bring his horn this day, when I saw him across the room I was already hankering to hear his  particular tenor logic, his duet cd PSALM with Sal Mosca is one of our favorites here at  725, as well his masterful trio cd CYCLE LOGICAL w/ Bill Chattin & Don Messina -- THAT was my  first question: "Jimmy, where's your saxophone?"

Don Messina, Jimmy Halperin, Kazzrie Jaxen —— November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber — Jimmy didn’t bring his horn this day, when I saw him across the room I was already hankering to hear his particular tenor logic, his duet cd PSALM with Sal Mosca is one of our favorites here at 725, as well his masterful trio cd CYCLE LOGICAL w/ Bill Chattin & Don Messina — THAT was my first question: “Jimmy, where’s your saxophone?”

The Connie Crothers Quartet  (Ken Filiano is not in the frame) one of the great bands of the 21st  Century having such far-ranging intensity of intentions of immediacy and Now-ness it is staggering --  this is the only shot I took of the band this day,  I had read my 5 poems and sat down stage right,  then snapped this one shot --  They opened up with "Melancholy Baby," then I did my poems, then  they played "Deep Friendship," and unsuspecting, Richard Tabnik called me back up, so I read a long  rambling poem about Richard Brautigan, or rather, a notion that is in the Brautigan vein . . . . .  Roger keeps  a Mapex set at Connie's studio, but has no special preference for brands, he has 4 sets total

The Connie Crothers Quartet (Ken Filiano is not in the frame) one of the great bands of the 21st Century having such far-ranging intensity of intentions of immediacy and Now-ness it is staggering — this is the only shot I took of the band this day, I had read my 5 poems and sat down stage right, then snapped this one shot — They opened up with “Melancholy Baby,” then I did my poems, then they played “Deep Friendship,” and unsuspecting, Richard Tabnik called me back up, so I read a long rambling poem about Richard Brautigan, or rather, a notion that is in the Brautigan vein . . . . . Roger keeps a Mapex set at Connie’s studio, but has no special preference for brands, he has 4 sets total

A swirl of smoke from a pipe

Something should happen — both while creating
and experiencing art

A central characteristic of humankind is that they are clever
Art is play: Rearranging materials into shapes and sounds

In many ways art is a summary statement. As time and place
………flow through you, as you
work your craft, as if history is progressive, or
more likely Fate lights the way (Gaed a wyrd swa hio scel!
……..–Line 455 Beowulf– Fate goeth ever as she must — Tolkien trans.)

So going, it is as with the tides and currents of the ocean,
as the autumn leaves fall . . .

We are but pilgrims:

The ineffable, indescribable
awe-struck ever-present
Lester Young in the room with us now

10:15am -- 8th Avenue & 23rd, Chelsea, Manhattan -- November 17, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

10:15am — 8th Avenue & 23rd, Chelsea, Manhattan — November 17, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

10:15am -- 23rd Street & Leo House where I was lodging (the building with flag) -- November 17, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

10:15am — 23rd Street & Leo House where I was lodging  (the building with U.S. flag) — November 17, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

Sunday on our way over to Connie's loft waiting for the bus outside Driggs Pizza  on Driggs Avenue (Bedford stop on the L Train) -- Roger Mancuso -- November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

Sunday on our way over to Connie’s loft waiting for the bus outside Driggs Pizza on Driggs Avenue (Bedford stop on the L Train) — Roger Mancuso — November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

Roger Mancuso on the move ---- I love these kind of shots, where the subject & camera & background  are all in movement -- this is what's called motion parallax, a term mostly used for movie making ----  makes for a dynamic frame ---- November 16, 2o14 -- photo by Mark Weber

Roger Mancuso on the move —- I love these kind of shots, where the subject & camera & background are all in movement — this is what’s called motion parallax, a term mostly used for movie making —- makes for a dynamic frame —- November 16, 2o14 — photo by Mark Weber

Have you ever wonder'd where Sheila Jordan lives in the city?  It's the one with  the awning ---- 18th Street near 8th Avenue in Chelsea -- photo by Mark Weber taken right  after bumping into Virg -- November 13, 2o14

Have you ever wonder’d where Sheila Jordan lives in the city? It’s the one with the awning —- 18th Street near 8th Avenue in Chelsea — photo by Mark Weber taken right after bumping into Virg — November 13, 2o14

BENEFIT CONCERT FOR BONNIE GARCIA

Four sets

  • Connie Crothers, Richard Tabnik, Roger Mancuso, Ken Filiano with poet Mark Weber
  • Carol Liebowitz / Adam Caine Duo
  • Virg Dzurinko
  • Kazzrie Jaxen Quartet

Open jam session to follow performances. Sunday November 16th, from 3:00 to 10:00. Connie’s loft, 475 Kent Avenue, #410 • Brooklyn NY | 718-302-4377 | Minimum donation $20

Painter and improvising musician Bonnie Garcia is the definition of life energy. Thirty years ago, while living in New York and studying piano with Connie Crothers, Bonnie was diagnosed with cancer and given three to six months to live. Rather than give in to despair, she decided to fight. And from that moment until today, Bonnie has had only one goal — to live every minute of her life as fully as possible and express that life through her art. Against all odds, and in addition to holding down all sorts of jobs to support herself, Bonnie has continued to paint and study music for the past three decades, all the while battling an increasingly devastating illness. And through it all, she has never once complained or asked for sympathy. She is an astonishing human being and an inspiration to all who know her.

In Bonnie’s own words:

The serious health challenges I have had forced me to live in the moment … This moment-to-moment living spills over into my painting and allows me to discover for myself, and help others discover, feelings we didn’t know we had, thereby opening ourselves up to a deeper understanding of life.

This concert, with a jam session to follow, is being held to raise money to help Bonnie with her medical expenses, which is why we are asking for a minimum donation of $20. And of course, anything above that amount will be greatly appreciated. (If you cannot attend the concert but wish to make a donation, you can send a check made out to Bonnie Garcia. Please mail checks to Connie Crothers, 475 Kent Avenue, #410, Brooklyn, New York 11249.)

There will also be a raffle, with tickets costing $5 each. The lucky winner will take home a basket filled with CDs, a good bottle of wine, and various other treats.

Performances will start roughly on the hour, beginning at 3:00 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Feel free to add to your donation by bringing along some food or beverages. To read more of Bonnie’s words and see examples of her paintings: http://edgeart.org/bgarcia

8 Comments

  1. Once again I must acknowledge the work of Klaus and Cal Haines on this Jazz For Mostly website —– Klaus takes the mass of content we send to him in a big jumble and he assembles it and lays it out —- and Cal doctors my photos, Note the shot of Virg & Kazzrie at the piano, that shot was a disaster before Cal took it for a spin

  2. excellent work all around…

  3. ALL modern literature! HA!
    (I guess you forgot that I read this stuff…)

  4. Wow – simply great poetry. The mail box looking for all that atmosphere like a horse/pony drawn carriage, trotting along in the mist.

  5. Great reportage, Mark, on a slice of the jazz world that somehow doesn’t get covered in the national jazz press (despite the efforts of some of us who labor in that military-industrial complex). I particularly like the Garry Winogrand vibe of your in-motion pic of Roger Mancuso on the street.

  6. 3 THINGS

    1) Quintus Horatius Flaccus was the Roman poet who published his ODES in 23BC that I keep bedside, more commonly known as Horace

    2) Is that a saxophone strap around Jimmy Halperin’s neck?

    3) Regrettably none of this day was recorded

  7. pix get better and better… so evocative and alive..
    almost hear the music… joan jobe voss

  8. 4) part of the set with Kazzrie’s Quartet was filmed and one tune can be seen on YouTube

    5) I was revisiting the actor Carroll O’Connor’s memoir last night (he was Archie Bunker, as well as the truck driver in one of my all-time favorite movies LONELY ARE THE BRAVE) and he is quite adamant that for a creative work to be called “art” it has to do with the “intention” and should “express insights into our brethren, our society, our condition of life, or that time, or that other time. Does the work invite us to understand ourselves? Which is a plain way of asking whether or not the work is intellectual, whether it is art.” He makes a distinction between “artistic” and “art.” pp.174-184

    I’m not sure my own work falls under that definition, but then, I don’t care what you call it. Art? Invention? Star gazing? At a certain point in your craft you don’t worry about what it’s called . . . .

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